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Measuring cost efficiency in the Nordic hospitals--a cross-sectional comparison of public hospitals in 2002.

Linna M, Häkkinen U, Peltola M, Magnussen J, Anthun KS, Kittelsen S, Roed A, Olsen K, Medin E, Rehnberg C - Health Care Manag Sci (2010)

Bottom Line: In 2002, average efficiency was markedly higher in Finland compared to Norway and Sweden.This study found differences in cost efficiency that cannot be explained by input prices or differences in coding practices.More analysis is needed to reveal the causes of large efficiency disparities between Nordic hospitals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: THL, Center for Health and Social Economics, Helsinki, Finland. mika.linna@thl.fi

ABSTRACT
The aim of this study was to compare the performance of hospital care in four Nordic countries: Norway, Finland, Sweden and Denmark. Using national discharge registries and cost data from hospitals, cost efficiency in the production of somatic hospital care was calculated for public hospitals. Data were collected using harmonized definitions of inputs and outputs for 184 hospitals and data envelopment analysis was used to calculate Farrell efficiency estimates for the year 2002. Results suggest that there were marked differences in the average hospital efficiency between Nordic countries. In 2002, average efficiency was markedly higher in Finland compared to Norway and Sweden. This study found differences in cost efficiency that cannot be explained by input prices or differences in coding practices. More analysis is needed to reveal the causes of large efficiency disparities between Nordic hospitals.

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Bias-corrected efficiency scores for Model5
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Fig1: Bias-corrected efficiency scores for Model5

Mentions: In Fig. 1 the bias-corrected efficiency scores and the bootstrapped 95% likelihood intervals are displayed for each of the hospitals for Model5. According to preliminary results there was more variation in cost efficiency among Swedish and Finnish hospitals, whereas the variance of efficiency scores was smallest in Norwegian hospitals (Fig. 1). Likelihood intervals seemed to be somewhat wider in the Finnish hospitals (Appendix 1).Fig. 1


Measuring cost efficiency in the Nordic hospitals--a cross-sectional comparison of public hospitals in 2002.

Linna M, Häkkinen U, Peltola M, Magnussen J, Anthun KS, Kittelsen S, Roed A, Olsen K, Medin E, Rehnberg C - Health Care Manag Sci (2010)

Bias-corrected efficiency scores for Model5
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2958261&req=5

Fig1: Bias-corrected efficiency scores for Model5
Mentions: In Fig. 1 the bias-corrected efficiency scores and the bootstrapped 95% likelihood intervals are displayed for each of the hospitals for Model5. According to preliminary results there was more variation in cost efficiency among Swedish and Finnish hospitals, whereas the variance of efficiency scores was smallest in Norwegian hospitals (Fig. 1). Likelihood intervals seemed to be somewhat wider in the Finnish hospitals (Appendix 1).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: In 2002, average efficiency was markedly higher in Finland compared to Norway and Sweden.This study found differences in cost efficiency that cannot be explained by input prices or differences in coding practices.More analysis is needed to reveal the causes of large efficiency disparities between Nordic hospitals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: THL, Center for Health and Social Economics, Helsinki, Finland. mika.linna@thl.fi

ABSTRACT
The aim of this study was to compare the performance of hospital care in four Nordic countries: Norway, Finland, Sweden and Denmark. Using national discharge registries and cost data from hospitals, cost efficiency in the production of somatic hospital care was calculated for public hospitals. Data were collected using harmonized definitions of inputs and outputs for 184 hospitals and data envelopment analysis was used to calculate Farrell efficiency estimates for the year 2002. Results suggest that there were marked differences in the average hospital efficiency between Nordic countries. In 2002, average efficiency was markedly higher in Finland compared to Norway and Sweden. This study found differences in cost efficiency that cannot be explained by input prices or differences in coding practices. More analysis is needed to reveal the causes of large efficiency disparities between Nordic hospitals.

Show MeSH