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Oral sucrose as an analgesic drug for procedural pain in newborn infants: a randomised controlled trial.

Slater R, Cornelissen L, Fabrizi L, Patten D, Yoxen J, Worley A, Boyd S, Meek J, Fitzgerald M - Lancet (2010)

Bottom Line: Nociceptive brain activity after the noxious heel lance did not differ significantly between infants who received sucrose and those who received sterile water (sucrose: mean 0·10, 95% CI 0·04-0·16; sterile water: mean 0·08, 0·04-0·12; p=0·46).Our data suggest that oral sucrose does not significantly affect activity in neonatal brain or spinal cord nociceptive circuits, and therefore might not be an effective analgesic drug.The ability of sucrose to reduce clinical observational scores after noxious events in newborn infants should not be interpreted as pain relief.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Nuffield Department of Anaesthetics, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. r.slater@ucl.ac.uk

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Trial profileEEG=electroencephalography. PIPP=premature infant pain profile. EMG=electromyography.
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f20: Trial profileEEG=electroencephalography. PIPP=premature infant pain profile. EMG=electromyography.

Mentions: Figure 2 shows the trial profile. There were no deviations from the inclusion and exclusion criteria. 59 infants were included in our initial sample, of whom 44 were included in the final analysis. Table 1 shows the characteristics of the final population of infants. After sucrose or sterile water administration the mean heart rate, oxygen saturation, and behavioural scores in the 15 s before the heel lance did not differ significantly between infants who were given sucrose and those given sterile water (table 2).


Oral sucrose as an analgesic drug for procedural pain in newborn infants: a randomised controlled trial.

Slater R, Cornelissen L, Fabrizi L, Patten D, Yoxen J, Worley A, Boyd S, Meek J, Fitzgerald M - Lancet (2010)

Trial profileEEG=electroencephalography. PIPP=premature infant pain profile. EMG=electromyography.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2958259&req=5

f20: Trial profileEEG=electroencephalography. PIPP=premature infant pain profile. EMG=electromyography.
Mentions: Figure 2 shows the trial profile. There were no deviations from the inclusion and exclusion criteria. 59 infants were included in our initial sample, of whom 44 were included in the final analysis. Table 1 shows the characteristics of the final population of infants. After sucrose or sterile water administration the mean heart rate, oxygen saturation, and behavioural scores in the 15 s before the heel lance did not differ significantly between infants who were given sucrose and those given sterile water (table 2).

Bottom Line: Nociceptive brain activity after the noxious heel lance did not differ significantly between infants who received sucrose and those who received sterile water (sucrose: mean 0·10, 95% CI 0·04-0·16; sterile water: mean 0·08, 0·04-0·12; p=0·46).Our data suggest that oral sucrose does not significantly affect activity in neonatal brain or spinal cord nociceptive circuits, and therefore might not be an effective analgesic drug.The ability of sucrose to reduce clinical observational scores after noxious events in newborn infants should not be interpreted as pain relief.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Nuffield Department of Anaesthetics, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. r.slater@ucl.ac.uk

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus