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Population-based rates of revision of primary total hip arthroplasty: a systematic review.

Corbett KL, Losina E, Nti AA, Prokopetz JJ, Katz JN - PLoS ONE (2010)

Bottom Line: Estimates ranged from 72% to 86% in patients less than 60 years old and from 90 to 96% in older patients.Data reported from national registries suggest revision risks of 5 to 20% ten years following primary THA.Revision risks are lower in older THA recipients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Orthopedic and Arthritis Center for Outcomes Research, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.

ABSTRACT

Background: Most research on failure leading to revision total hip arthroplasty (THA) is reported from single centers. We searched PubMed between January 2000 and August 2010 to identify population- or community-based studies evaluating ten-year revision risks. We report ten-year revision risk using the Kaplan-Meier method, stratifying by age and fixation technique.

Results: Thirteen papers met the inclusion criteria. Cemented prostheses had Kaplan-Meier estimates of revision-free implant survival of ten years ranging from 88% to 95%; uncemented prostheses had Kaplan-Meier estimates from 80% to 85%. Estimates ranged from 72% to 86% in patients less than 60 years old and from 90 to 96% in older patients.

Conclusion: Data reported from national registries suggest revision risks of 5 to 20% ten years following primary THA. Revision risks are lower in older THA recipients. Uncemented implants may have higher ten-year rates of revision, regardless of age.

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Kaplan-Meier ten-year hip prosthesis survival by age group.Kaplan-Meier ten-year estimates are stratified by register and age group. Circle area is proportional to the sample size. Error bars represent 95% CIs. Estimates are inclusive of all prosthesis types. The endpoint was revision for any reason, except for the Swedish studies, where it was revision due to aseptic loosening only. 75% of the Swedish sample, 78% of the Finnish sample, and 100% of the Norwegian sample were operated on for osteoarthritis. Each study reference is denoted next to the circle, representing the corresponding manuscript from which the Kaplan-Meier estimates were derived.
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pone-0013520-g003: Kaplan-Meier ten-year hip prosthesis survival by age group.Kaplan-Meier ten-year estimates are stratified by register and age group. Circle area is proportional to the sample size. Error bars represent 95% CIs. Estimates are inclusive of all prosthesis types. The endpoint was revision for any reason, except for the Swedish studies, where it was revision due to aseptic loosening only. 75% of the Swedish sample, 78% of the Finnish sample, and 100% of the Norwegian sample were operated on for osteoarthritis. Each study reference is denoted next to the circle, representing the corresponding manuscript from which the Kaplan-Meier estimates were derived.

Mentions: The Kaplan-Meier ten-year revision-free survival estimates for younger patients ranged from 72% (95% CI: 67, 76) in Finland to 86% (95% CI: 84.5, 88.2) in Sweden (Figure 3). Revision risk was lower in older patients, with Kaplan-Meier ten-year revision-free survival estimates ranging from 90% (95% CI: 89, 91) in Finland to 97% (95% CI: 96.3, 97) in Sweden. The endpoint for these estimates was revision for any reason. These estimates were inclusive of all fixation methods (e.g. cemented, uncemented) and types of prostheses. The Norwegian reports excluded all diagnoses other than OA, while the Swedish sample was 75% OA and the Finnish sample was 78% OA.


Population-based rates of revision of primary total hip arthroplasty: a systematic review.

Corbett KL, Losina E, Nti AA, Prokopetz JJ, Katz JN - PLoS ONE (2010)

Kaplan-Meier ten-year hip prosthesis survival by age group.Kaplan-Meier ten-year estimates are stratified by register and age group. Circle area is proportional to the sample size. Error bars represent 95% CIs. Estimates are inclusive of all prosthesis types. The endpoint was revision for any reason, except for the Swedish studies, where it was revision due to aseptic loosening only. 75% of the Swedish sample, 78% of the Finnish sample, and 100% of the Norwegian sample were operated on for osteoarthritis. Each study reference is denoted next to the circle, representing the corresponding manuscript from which the Kaplan-Meier estimates were derived.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2958142&req=5

pone-0013520-g003: Kaplan-Meier ten-year hip prosthesis survival by age group.Kaplan-Meier ten-year estimates are stratified by register and age group. Circle area is proportional to the sample size. Error bars represent 95% CIs. Estimates are inclusive of all prosthesis types. The endpoint was revision for any reason, except for the Swedish studies, where it was revision due to aseptic loosening only. 75% of the Swedish sample, 78% of the Finnish sample, and 100% of the Norwegian sample were operated on for osteoarthritis. Each study reference is denoted next to the circle, representing the corresponding manuscript from which the Kaplan-Meier estimates were derived.
Mentions: The Kaplan-Meier ten-year revision-free survival estimates for younger patients ranged from 72% (95% CI: 67, 76) in Finland to 86% (95% CI: 84.5, 88.2) in Sweden (Figure 3). Revision risk was lower in older patients, with Kaplan-Meier ten-year revision-free survival estimates ranging from 90% (95% CI: 89, 91) in Finland to 97% (95% CI: 96.3, 97) in Sweden. The endpoint for these estimates was revision for any reason. These estimates were inclusive of all fixation methods (e.g. cemented, uncemented) and types of prostheses. The Norwegian reports excluded all diagnoses other than OA, while the Swedish sample was 75% OA and the Finnish sample was 78% OA.

Bottom Line: Estimates ranged from 72% to 86% in patients less than 60 years old and from 90 to 96% in older patients.Data reported from national registries suggest revision risks of 5 to 20% ten years following primary THA.Revision risks are lower in older THA recipients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Orthopedic and Arthritis Center for Outcomes Research, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.

ABSTRACT

Background: Most research on failure leading to revision total hip arthroplasty (THA) is reported from single centers. We searched PubMed between January 2000 and August 2010 to identify population- or community-based studies evaluating ten-year revision risks. We report ten-year revision risk using the Kaplan-Meier method, stratifying by age and fixation technique.

Results: Thirteen papers met the inclusion criteria. Cemented prostheses had Kaplan-Meier estimates of revision-free implant survival of ten years ranging from 88% to 95%; uncemented prostheses had Kaplan-Meier estimates from 80% to 85%. Estimates ranged from 72% to 86% in patients less than 60 years old and from 90 to 96% in older patients.

Conclusion: Data reported from national registries suggest revision risks of 5 to 20% ten years following primary THA. Revision risks are lower in older THA recipients. Uncemented implants may have higher ten-year rates of revision, regardless of age.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus