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A gap analysis methodology for collecting crop genepools: a case study with phaseolus beans.

Ramírez-Villegas J, Khoury C, Jarvis A, Debouck DG, Guarino L - PLoS ONE (2010)

Bottom Line: The methodology prioritizes among taxa based on a combination of sampling, geographic, and environmental gaps.We apply the gap analysis methodology to wild taxa of the Phaseolus genepool.Results of the gap analysis method mostly align very well with expert opinion of gaps in ex situ collections, with only a few exceptions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Decision and Policy Analysis Program, International Center for Tropical Agriculture, Cali, Colombia. j.r.villegas@cgiar.org

ABSTRACT

Background: The wild relatives of crops represent a major source of valuable traits for crop improvement. These resources are threatened by habitat destruction, land use changes, and other factors, requiring their urgent collection and long-term availability for research and breeding from ex situ collections. We propose a method to identify gaps in ex situ collections (i.e. gap analysis) of crop wild relatives as a means to guide efficient and effective collecting activities.

Methodology/principal findings: The methodology prioritizes among taxa based on a combination of sampling, geographic, and environmental gaps. We apply the gap analysis methodology to wild taxa of the Phaseolus genepool. Of 85 taxa, 48 (56.5%) are assigned high priority for collecting due to lack of, or under-representation, in genebanks, 17 taxa are given medium priority for collecting, 15 low priority, and 5 species are assessed as adequately represented in ex situ collections. Gap "hotspots", representing priority target areas for collecting, are concentrated in central Mexico, although the narrow endemic nature of a suite of priority species adds a number of specific additional regions to spatial collecting priorities.

Conclusions/significance: Results of the gap analysis method mostly align very well with expert opinion of gaps in ex situ collections, with only a few exceptions. A more detailed prioritization of taxa and geographic areas for collection can be achieved by including in the analysis predictive threat factors, such as climate change or habitat destruction, or by adding additional prioritization filters, such as the degree of relatedness to cultivated species (i.e. ease of use in crop breeding). Furthermore, results for multiple crop genepools may be overlaid, which would allow a global analysis of gaps in ex situ collections of the world's plant genetic resources.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Prioritization results.(A) Zones where gaps in ex situ collections for multiple taxa overlap (collecting gap richness) for high priority species, (B) modeling uncertainties as standard deviations among high priority modeled taxa, (C) collecting uncertainties as maximum geographic distance to nearest known population.
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pone-0013497-g006: Prioritization results.(A) Zones where gaps in ex situ collections for multiple taxa overlap (collecting gap richness) for high priority species, (B) modeling uncertainties as standard deviations among high priority modeled taxa, (C) collecting uncertainties as maximum geographic distance to nearest known population.

Mentions: 36 priority taxa (i.e. those flagged as high priority and with sufficient location data) were mapped together, along with standard deviations on predicted Maxent probabilities (aggregated for all the taxa using the maximum value) and distances to the nearest population (also aggregated) (Figure 6). Potential collection sites have a richness of up to 7 taxa per grid (Figure 6a). Zones where gaps in ex situ collections for many Phaseolus taxa overlap are concentrated in central-western Mexico, with an extension along the Sierra Madre Occidental north to Sonora.


A gap analysis methodology for collecting crop genepools: a case study with phaseolus beans.

Ramírez-Villegas J, Khoury C, Jarvis A, Debouck DG, Guarino L - PLoS ONE (2010)

Prioritization results.(A) Zones where gaps in ex situ collections for multiple taxa overlap (collecting gap richness) for high priority species, (B) modeling uncertainties as standard deviations among high priority modeled taxa, (C) collecting uncertainties as maximum geographic distance to nearest known population.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2958131&req=5

pone-0013497-g006: Prioritization results.(A) Zones where gaps in ex situ collections for multiple taxa overlap (collecting gap richness) for high priority species, (B) modeling uncertainties as standard deviations among high priority modeled taxa, (C) collecting uncertainties as maximum geographic distance to nearest known population.
Mentions: 36 priority taxa (i.e. those flagged as high priority and with sufficient location data) were mapped together, along with standard deviations on predicted Maxent probabilities (aggregated for all the taxa using the maximum value) and distances to the nearest population (also aggregated) (Figure 6). Potential collection sites have a richness of up to 7 taxa per grid (Figure 6a). Zones where gaps in ex situ collections for many Phaseolus taxa overlap are concentrated in central-western Mexico, with an extension along the Sierra Madre Occidental north to Sonora.

Bottom Line: The methodology prioritizes among taxa based on a combination of sampling, geographic, and environmental gaps.We apply the gap analysis methodology to wild taxa of the Phaseolus genepool.Results of the gap analysis method mostly align very well with expert opinion of gaps in ex situ collections, with only a few exceptions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Decision and Policy Analysis Program, International Center for Tropical Agriculture, Cali, Colombia. j.r.villegas@cgiar.org

ABSTRACT

Background: The wild relatives of crops represent a major source of valuable traits for crop improvement. These resources are threatened by habitat destruction, land use changes, and other factors, requiring their urgent collection and long-term availability for research and breeding from ex situ collections. We propose a method to identify gaps in ex situ collections (i.e. gap analysis) of crop wild relatives as a means to guide efficient and effective collecting activities.

Methodology/principal findings: The methodology prioritizes among taxa based on a combination of sampling, geographic, and environmental gaps. We apply the gap analysis methodology to wild taxa of the Phaseolus genepool. Of 85 taxa, 48 (56.5%) are assigned high priority for collecting due to lack of, or under-representation, in genebanks, 17 taxa are given medium priority for collecting, 15 low priority, and 5 species are assessed as adequately represented in ex situ collections. Gap "hotspots", representing priority target areas for collecting, are concentrated in central Mexico, although the narrow endemic nature of a suite of priority species adds a number of specific additional regions to spatial collecting priorities.

Conclusions/significance: Results of the gap analysis method mostly align very well with expert opinion of gaps in ex situ collections, with only a few exceptions. A more detailed prioritization of taxa and geographic areas for collection can be achieved by including in the analysis predictive threat factors, such as climate change or habitat destruction, or by adding additional prioritization filters, such as the degree of relatedness to cultivated species (i.e. ease of use in crop breeding). Furthermore, results for multiple crop genepools may be overlaid, which would allow a global analysis of gaps in ex situ collections of the world's plant genetic resources.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus