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Investigating an airborne tularemia outbreak, Germany.

Hauri AM, Hofstetter I, Seibold E, Kaysser P, Eckert J, Neubauer H, Splettstoesser WD - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2010)

Bottom Line: In November 2005, an outbreak of tularemia occurred among 39 participants in a hare hunt in Hesse, Germany.Previously reported tularemia outbreaks in Germany dated back to the 1950s.Eleven of 14 hare parts showed low-level concentrations of F. tularensis, compatible with cross-contamination.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Hesse State Health Office, Dillenburg, Germany. anja.hauri@hlpug.hessen.de

ABSTRACT
In November 2005, an outbreak of tularemia occurred among 39 participants in a hare hunt in Hesse, Germany. Previously reported tularemia outbreaks in Germany dated back to the 1950s. We conducted a retrospective cohort study among participants and investigated the environment to identify risk factors for infection. Ten participants had serologic evidence of acute Francisella tularensis infection; 1 other participant died before laboratory confirmation was obtained. Presence within 5 meters of the place where disemboweled hares were rinsed with a water hose was the risk factor most strongly associated with infection (risk ratio 22.1; 95% confidence interval 13.2-154.3). Swabs taken at the game chamber and water samples were PCR negative for F. tularensis. Eleven of 14 hare parts showed low-level concentrations of F. tularensis, compatible with cross-contamination. More than half of case-patients may have acquired infection through inhalation of aerosolized droplets containing F. tularensis generated during rinsing of infected hares.

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Sampling at the game chamber, Hesse, Germany, December 2005.
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Figure 1: Sampling at the game chamber, Hesse, Germany, December 2005.

Mentions: Starting in early December 2005, we visited the outbreak area 3 times. We obtained data on elevation, regional mean annual air temperature, precipitation, and sunshine hours (1961–2004) from the Federal Meteorological Service (Offenbach am Main, Germany). Water samples were obtained from a small creek near the hunting lodge and from the water hose used to rinse disemboweled hares. Additionally, 28 samples were taken at the game chamber (Table 1; Figure 1). All samples were stored at 4°C.


Investigating an airborne tularemia outbreak, Germany.

Hauri AM, Hofstetter I, Seibold E, Kaysser P, Eckert J, Neubauer H, Splettstoesser WD - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2010)

Sampling at the game chamber, Hesse, Germany, December 2005.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2957990&req=5

Figure 1: Sampling at the game chamber, Hesse, Germany, December 2005.
Mentions: Starting in early December 2005, we visited the outbreak area 3 times. We obtained data on elevation, regional mean annual air temperature, precipitation, and sunshine hours (1961–2004) from the Federal Meteorological Service (Offenbach am Main, Germany). Water samples were obtained from a small creek near the hunting lodge and from the water hose used to rinse disemboweled hares. Additionally, 28 samples were taken at the game chamber (Table 1; Figure 1). All samples were stored at 4°C.

Bottom Line: In November 2005, an outbreak of tularemia occurred among 39 participants in a hare hunt in Hesse, Germany.Previously reported tularemia outbreaks in Germany dated back to the 1950s.Eleven of 14 hare parts showed low-level concentrations of F. tularensis, compatible with cross-contamination.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Hesse State Health Office, Dillenburg, Germany. anja.hauri@hlpug.hessen.de

ABSTRACT
In November 2005, an outbreak of tularemia occurred among 39 participants in a hare hunt in Hesse, Germany. Previously reported tularemia outbreaks in Germany dated back to the 1950s. We conducted a retrospective cohort study among participants and investigated the environment to identify risk factors for infection. Ten participants had serologic evidence of acute Francisella tularensis infection; 1 other participant died before laboratory confirmation was obtained. Presence within 5 meters of the place where disemboweled hares were rinsed with a water hose was the risk factor most strongly associated with infection (risk ratio 22.1; 95% confidence interval 13.2-154.3). Swabs taken at the game chamber and water samples were PCR negative for F. tularensis. Eleven of 14 hare parts showed low-level concentrations of F. tularensis, compatible with cross-contamination. More than half of case-patients may have acquired infection through inhalation of aerosolized droplets containing F. tularensis generated during rinsing of infected hares.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus