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Fear of bioterrorism and implications for public health preparedness.

Dworkin MS, Ma X, Golash RG - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2003)

Bottom Line: After the human anthrax cases and exposures in 2001, the Illinois Department of Public Health received an increasing number of environmental and human samples (1,496 environmental submissions, all negative for Bacillus anthracis).These data demonstrate increased volume of submissions to a public health laboratory resulting from fear of bioterrorism.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Illinois Department of Public Health, Chicago, Illinois 60601, USA. mdworkin@idph.state.il.us

ABSTRACT
After the human anthrax cases and exposures in 2001, the Illinois Department of Public Health received an increasing number of environmental and human samples (1,496 environmental submissions, all negative for Bacillus anthracis). These data demonstrate increased volume of submissions to a public health laboratory resulting from fear of bioterrorism.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Number of environmental specimens submitted to the Illinois Department of Public Health Division of Laboratories for Bacillus anthracis testing each week from October 8 through December 30, 2001 and number of human cases occurring on the East Coast and reported each week in the news media.
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Figure 1: Number of environmental specimens submitted to the Illinois Department of Public Health Division of Laboratories for Bacillus anthracis testing each week from October 8 through December 30, 2001 and number of human cases occurring on the East Coast and reported each week in the news media.

Mentions: A total of 1,496 environmental specimens were processed: 1,193 (79.7%) in Chicago and 303 (20.3%) in Springfield. An additional 40 human specimens were processed, 28 (70%) in Chicago and 12 (30%) in Springfield. Chicago sample submissions rose steadily after the first week of October and peaked during the week of October 29 through November 4, with the largest number of submissions processed on November 7 (range 0–64 submissions per day) (Figure). An additional 17 submissions for which the date of submission was not clearly documented, and may have preceded October 8, also were processed. Powdery substances constituted 42.0% of submissions to the Chicago laboratory versus 33.7% of submissions to the Springfield laboratory. Nonpowdery substances (e.g., environmental swab samples, letters, envelopes, packages, and other materials) constituted 58.0% of submissions to the Chicago laboratory versus 66.3% of submissions to the Springfield laboratory. Eight additional environmental samples that did not go through the FBI were received by the Chicago laboratory from hospitals.


Fear of bioterrorism and implications for public health preparedness.

Dworkin MS, Ma X, Golash RG - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2003)

Number of environmental specimens submitted to the Illinois Department of Public Health Division of Laboratories for Bacillus anthracis testing each week from October 8 through December 30, 2001 and number of human cases occurring on the East Coast and reported each week in the news media.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2957975&req=5

Figure 1: Number of environmental specimens submitted to the Illinois Department of Public Health Division of Laboratories for Bacillus anthracis testing each week from October 8 through December 30, 2001 and number of human cases occurring on the East Coast and reported each week in the news media.
Mentions: A total of 1,496 environmental specimens were processed: 1,193 (79.7%) in Chicago and 303 (20.3%) in Springfield. An additional 40 human specimens were processed, 28 (70%) in Chicago and 12 (30%) in Springfield. Chicago sample submissions rose steadily after the first week of October and peaked during the week of October 29 through November 4, with the largest number of submissions processed on November 7 (range 0–64 submissions per day) (Figure). An additional 17 submissions for which the date of submission was not clearly documented, and may have preceded October 8, also were processed. Powdery substances constituted 42.0% of submissions to the Chicago laboratory versus 33.7% of submissions to the Springfield laboratory. Nonpowdery substances (e.g., environmental swab samples, letters, envelopes, packages, and other materials) constituted 58.0% of submissions to the Chicago laboratory versus 66.3% of submissions to the Springfield laboratory. Eight additional environmental samples that did not go through the FBI were received by the Chicago laboratory from hospitals.

Bottom Line: After the human anthrax cases and exposures in 2001, the Illinois Department of Public Health received an increasing number of environmental and human samples (1,496 environmental submissions, all negative for Bacillus anthracis).These data demonstrate increased volume of submissions to a public health laboratory resulting from fear of bioterrorism.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Illinois Department of Public Health, Chicago, Illinois 60601, USA. mdworkin@idph.state.il.us

ABSTRACT
After the human anthrax cases and exposures in 2001, the Illinois Department of Public Health received an increasing number of environmental and human samples (1,496 environmental submissions, all negative for Bacillus anthracis). These data demonstrate increased volume of submissions to a public health laboratory resulting from fear of bioterrorism.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus