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Early-season avian deaths from West Nile virus as warnings of human infection.

Guptill SC, Julian KG, Campbell GL, Price SD, Marfin AA - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2003)

Bottom Line: An analysis of 2001 and 2002 West Nile virus (WNV) surveillance data shows that counties that report WNV-infected dead birds early in the transmission season are more likely to report subsequent WNV disease cases in humans than are counties that do not report early WNV-infected dead birds.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia 20192, USA. sguptill@usgs.gov

ABSTRACT
An analysis of 2001 and 2002 West Nile virus (WNV) surveillance data shows that counties that report WNV-infected dead birds early in the transmission season are more likely to report subsequent WNV disease cases in humans than are counties that do not report early WNV-infected dead birds.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Counties reporting avian deaths and human meningitis/encephalitis caused by West Nile virus (WNV), January 1–November 30, 2002. Counties reporting human illness are outlined in red. The color within the county indicates the date when the first avian death from WNV was reported in that county. Counties that report dead birds early in the year are more likely to report subsequent disease cases in humans
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Figure 2: Counties reporting avian deaths and human meningitis/encephalitis caused by West Nile virus (WNV), January 1–November 30, 2002. Counties reporting human illness are outlined in red. The color within the county indicates the date when the first avian death from WNV was reported in that county. Counties that report dead birds early in the year are more likely to report subsequent disease cases in humans

Mentions: Recently, provisional totals for the 2002 WNV surveillance data have become available through ArboNET. Given the great increase in the geographic extent and the 50-fold increase in the number of human cases of WNV, we repeated this analysis by using the provisional data for 2002 to see if similar results would be obtained. A great deal of variation in the reporting of WNV fever cases has occurred between states. For this reason, only WNV meningitis and encephalitis cases were included in this analysis. In the provisional figures for 2002, a total of 504 counties reported human cases of WNV meningoencephalitis, and 1,719 counties reported WNV-infected birds. Of 632 counties that reported at least one WNV-infected bird before August 4, a total of 284 (45%) subsequently reported a human WNV disease in 2002 compared to 220 (19%) of 1,162 counties that did not report an infected bird (RR 2.37, 95% CI 2.05 to 2.75). Thus in 2002, counties that reported a WNV-infected dead bird before August 4 were more than two times more likely than other counties to report a human case of WNV disease (Figure 2).


Early-season avian deaths from West Nile virus as warnings of human infection.

Guptill SC, Julian KG, Campbell GL, Price SD, Marfin AA - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2003)

Counties reporting avian deaths and human meningitis/encephalitis caused by West Nile virus (WNV), January 1–November 30, 2002. Counties reporting human illness are outlined in red. The color within the county indicates the date when the first avian death from WNV was reported in that county. Counties that report dead birds early in the year are more likely to report subsequent disease cases in humans
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2957970&req=5

Figure 2: Counties reporting avian deaths and human meningitis/encephalitis caused by West Nile virus (WNV), January 1–November 30, 2002. Counties reporting human illness are outlined in red. The color within the county indicates the date when the first avian death from WNV was reported in that county. Counties that report dead birds early in the year are more likely to report subsequent disease cases in humans
Mentions: Recently, provisional totals for the 2002 WNV surveillance data have become available through ArboNET. Given the great increase in the geographic extent and the 50-fold increase in the number of human cases of WNV, we repeated this analysis by using the provisional data for 2002 to see if similar results would be obtained. A great deal of variation in the reporting of WNV fever cases has occurred between states. For this reason, only WNV meningitis and encephalitis cases were included in this analysis. In the provisional figures for 2002, a total of 504 counties reported human cases of WNV meningoencephalitis, and 1,719 counties reported WNV-infected birds. Of 632 counties that reported at least one WNV-infected bird before August 4, a total of 284 (45%) subsequently reported a human WNV disease in 2002 compared to 220 (19%) of 1,162 counties that did not report an infected bird (RR 2.37, 95% CI 2.05 to 2.75). Thus in 2002, counties that reported a WNV-infected dead bird before August 4 were more than two times more likely than other counties to report a human case of WNV disease (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: An analysis of 2001 and 2002 West Nile virus (WNV) surveillance data shows that counties that report WNV-infected dead birds early in the transmission season are more likely to report subsequent WNV disease cases in humans than are counties that do not report early WNV-infected dead birds.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia 20192, USA. sguptill@usgs.gov

ABSTRACT
An analysis of 2001 and 2002 West Nile virus (WNV) surveillance data shows that counties that report WNV-infected dead birds early in the transmission season are more likely to report subsequent WNV disease cases in humans than are counties that do not report early WNV-infected dead birds.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus