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Biodegradation of the metallic carcinogen hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) by an indigenously isolated bacterial strain.

Das AP, Mishra S - J Carcinog (2010)

Bottom Line: At about 50 mg/L initial Cr(VI) concentrations, uptake of the selected potential strain exceeded 98% within 12 h of incubation.The bacterial isolate was identified by 16S rRNA sequencing as Brevebacterium casei.Results indicated promising approach for microbial remediation of effluents containing elevated levels of Cr(VI).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre of Biotechnology, Siksha 'O' Anusandhan University, Bhubaneswar, India.

ABSTRACT

Background: Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], a potential mutagen and carcinogen, is regularly introduced into the environment through diverse anthropogenic activities, including electroplating, leather tanning, and pigment manufacturing. Human exposure to this toxic metal ion not only causes potential human health hazards but also affects other life forms. The World Health Organization, the International Agency for Research on Cancer, and the Environmental Protection Agency have determined that Cr(VI) compounds are known human carcinogens. The Sukinda valley in Jajpur District, Orissa, is known for its deposit of chromite ore, producing nearly 98% of the chromite ore in India and one of the prime open cast chromite ore mines in the world (CES, Orissa Newsletter).

Materials and methods: Our investigation involved microbial remediation of Cr(VI) without producing any byproduct. Bacterial cultures tolerating high concentrations of Cr were isolated from the soil sample collected from the chromite-contaminated sites of Sukinda, and their bioaccumulation properties were investigated. Strains capable of growing at 250 mg/L Cr(VI) were considered as Cr resistant.

Results: The experimental investigation showed the maximum specific Cr uptake at pH 7 and temperature 30°C. At about 50 mg/L initial Cr(VI) concentrations, uptake of the selected potential strain exceeded 98% within 12 h of incubation. The bacterial isolate was identified by 16S rRNA sequencing as Brevebacterium casei.

Conclusion: Results indicated promising approach for microbial remediation of effluents containing elevated levels of Cr(VI).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis of the soil sample
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Figure 0002: Energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis of the soil sample

Mentions: The SEM analysis of soil samples determines its morphologic characteristics. The micrograph illustrates the shape of the soil particles [Figure 1]. Chemical composition was determined by using an EDX spectrometer. Analyses of these soil particles, with EDX, indicate that Cr is present in the soil sample along with other heavy metals, such as Fe, Al, and Si, and is shown in Figure 2. Similar reports of morphologic characteristics and elemental chemical analyses of the soil performed with SEM-EDX collected from the facilities of the Química Central Chromate Factory, which is located at Leon-San Francisco del Rincon.[12]


Biodegradation of the metallic carcinogen hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) by an indigenously isolated bacterial strain.

Das AP, Mishra S - J Carcinog (2010)

Energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis of the soil sample
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2957624&req=5

Figure 0002: Energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis of the soil sample
Mentions: The SEM analysis of soil samples determines its morphologic characteristics. The micrograph illustrates the shape of the soil particles [Figure 1]. Chemical composition was determined by using an EDX spectrometer. Analyses of these soil particles, with EDX, indicate that Cr is present in the soil sample along with other heavy metals, such as Fe, Al, and Si, and is shown in Figure 2. Similar reports of morphologic characteristics and elemental chemical analyses of the soil performed with SEM-EDX collected from the facilities of the Química Central Chromate Factory, which is located at Leon-San Francisco del Rincon.[12]

Bottom Line: At about 50 mg/L initial Cr(VI) concentrations, uptake of the selected potential strain exceeded 98% within 12 h of incubation.The bacterial isolate was identified by 16S rRNA sequencing as Brevebacterium casei.Results indicated promising approach for microbial remediation of effluents containing elevated levels of Cr(VI).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre of Biotechnology, Siksha 'O' Anusandhan University, Bhubaneswar, India.

ABSTRACT

Background: Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], a potential mutagen and carcinogen, is regularly introduced into the environment through diverse anthropogenic activities, including electroplating, leather tanning, and pigment manufacturing. Human exposure to this toxic metal ion not only causes potential human health hazards but also affects other life forms. The World Health Organization, the International Agency for Research on Cancer, and the Environmental Protection Agency have determined that Cr(VI) compounds are known human carcinogens. The Sukinda valley in Jajpur District, Orissa, is known for its deposit of chromite ore, producing nearly 98% of the chromite ore in India and one of the prime open cast chromite ore mines in the world (CES, Orissa Newsletter).

Materials and methods: Our investigation involved microbial remediation of Cr(VI) without producing any byproduct. Bacterial cultures tolerating high concentrations of Cr were isolated from the soil sample collected from the chromite-contaminated sites of Sukinda, and their bioaccumulation properties were investigated. Strains capable of growing at 250 mg/L Cr(VI) were considered as Cr resistant.

Results: The experimental investigation showed the maximum specific Cr uptake at pH 7 and temperature 30°C. At about 50 mg/L initial Cr(VI) concentrations, uptake of the selected potential strain exceeded 98% within 12 h of incubation. The bacterial isolate was identified by 16S rRNA sequencing as Brevebacterium casei.

Conclusion: Results indicated promising approach for microbial remediation of effluents containing elevated levels of Cr(VI).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus