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Conjunctivitis and Total IgE in Lacrimal Fluid: Lacrytest Screening.

Monzón S, Arrondo E, Bartra J, Torres F, Basagaña M, Del Mar San Miguel M, Alonso R, Cisteró-Bahima A - J Allergy (Cairo) (2009)

Bottom Line: This was a cross-sectional study.Lacrytest(®) was later performed in all groups.Global statistically-significant differences were found among the three groups (P = .003).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Allergy Department, Dexeus Institute, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB), 08028 Barcelona, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Total tear IgE has been considered to play an important role in allergic conjunctivitis, and measurement has been considered useful for diagnosis. The aim of this study was to ascertain whether Lacrytest(®), a new commercialised method to detect IgE levels in lacrimal fluid, could constitute a screening test for the diagnosis of allergic conjunctivitis. This was a cross-sectional study. Patients with seasonal and perennial allergic conjunctivitis, vernal keratoconjunctivitis and a control group were included. Clinical history, ophthalmic examination, skin prick test and conjunctival provocation test were obtained. Lacrytest(®) was later performed in all groups. Fifty-four patients were enrolled: thirty with IgE-mediated conjunctivitis and, nine with vernal keratoconjunctivitis and fifteen controls. Lacrytest(®) was negative in all controls, positive in 20% of the IgE-mediated conjunctivitis group and in 88.9% of the vernal keratoconjunctivitis group. Global statistically-significant differences were found among the three groups (P = .003). Sensitivity of the test in the IgE-mediated conjunctivitis group was 20%, specificity 100%, positive predictive value 100%, and negative predictive value 38.46%, while in VKC sensitivity was 88.88%, specificity 100%, positive predictive value 100%, and negative predictive value 93.75%. Our data confirm that this test is not useful for screening allergic conjunctivitis. Lacrytest(®), while not providing any useful information to an allergist, could be helpful for ophthalmologists to confirm an IgE-mediated or VKC conjunctivitis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Lacrytest global results. Number of subjects is shown on the top of each column.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: Lacrytest global results. Number of subjects is shown on the top of each column.

Mentions: TheLacrytest was positive in only 6 patients with IgE-mediated conjunctivitis(20%) and 8 patients with vernal keratoconjunctivitis (88.9%) and was negative inall controls (100%). Differences were significant when the three groups werecompared (P = .003); pair-wise comparisons of VKC versus the other groups werestatistically significant (P < .001 for both comparisons), but not betweenIgE-mediated conjunctivitis and control groups (P = .157). (Figure 1).


Conjunctivitis and Total IgE in Lacrimal Fluid: Lacrytest Screening.

Monzón S, Arrondo E, Bartra J, Torres F, Basagaña M, Del Mar San Miguel M, Alonso R, Cisteró-Bahima A - J Allergy (Cairo) (2009)

Lacrytest global results. Number of subjects is shown on the top of each column.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2957614&req=5

fig1: Lacrytest global results. Number of subjects is shown on the top of each column.
Mentions: TheLacrytest was positive in only 6 patients with IgE-mediated conjunctivitis(20%) and 8 patients with vernal keratoconjunctivitis (88.9%) and was negative inall controls (100%). Differences were significant when the three groups werecompared (P = .003); pair-wise comparisons of VKC versus the other groups werestatistically significant (P < .001 for both comparisons), but not betweenIgE-mediated conjunctivitis and control groups (P = .157). (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: This was a cross-sectional study.Lacrytest(®) was later performed in all groups.Global statistically-significant differences were found among the three groups (P = .003).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Allergy Department, Dexeus Institute, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB), 08028 Barcelona, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Total tear IgE has been considered to play an important role in allergic conjunctivitis, and measurement has been considered useful for diagnosis. The aim of this study was to ascertain whether Lacrytest(®), a new commercialised method to detect IgE levels in lacrimal fluid, could constitute a screening test for the diagnosis of allergic conjunctivitis. This was a cross-sectional study. Patients with seasonal and perennial allergic conjunctivitis, vernal keratoconjunctivitis and a control group were included. Clinical history, ophthalmic examination, skin prick test and conjunctival provocation test were obtained. Lacrytest(®) was later performed in all groups. Fifty-four patients were enrolled: thirty with IgE-mediated conjunctivitis and, nine with vernal keratoconjunctivitis and fifteen controls. Lacrytest(®) was negative in all controls, positive in 20% of the IgE-mediated conjunctivitis group and in 88.9% of the vernal keratoconjunctivitis group. Global statistically-significant differences were found among the three groups (P = .003). Sensitivity of the test in the IgE-mediated conjunctivitis group was 20%, specificity 100%, positive predictive value 100%, and negative predictive value 38.46%, while in VKC sensitivity was 88.88%, specificity 100%, positive predictive value 100%, and negative predictive value 93.75%. Our data confirm that this test is not useful for screening allergic conjunctivitis. Lacrytest(®), while not providing any useful information to an allergist, could be helpful for ophthalmologists to confirm an IgE-mediated or VKC conjunctivitis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus