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The psychosocial impact of self-reported morning allergy symptoms: findings from an Australian internet-based survey.

Sharp TJ, Seeto C - J Allergy (Cairo) (2010)

Bottom Line: Results.Discussion.Encouraging consumers with self-diagnosed AR to seek formal diagnosis and offering appropriate treatment strategies, such as those offering sustained effectiveness over 24-hours, may aid in negating the negative impact of morning symptoms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: RMIT School of Health Sciences, Melbourne, VIC 3083, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Background. Allergies can substantially impact health-related quality of life (HRQL). We investigated the psychosocial impact of morning symptoms amongst Australian adults with self-reported allergic rhinitis (AR). Method. An online survey comprising 24 questions was conducted in August 2008. Inclusion criteria were age (20-49 years) and self-reported moderate to severe symptoms of AR. Results. One thousand sixty respondents met the inclusion criteria. Amongst consumers with self-reported AR, symptoms were more severe in the morning in 597 (56%) and affected mood in 1025 (97%). Nine hundred seventy (91%) indicated that their symptoms had some impact on their day ahead and 868 (82%) reported a negative impact on relationships. Morning symptoms in particular had a substantial affect on mood for the day. HRQL impact was more pronounced in those who reported severe symptoms and in females. Discussion. Encouraging consumers with self-diagnosed AR to seek formal diagnosis and offering appropriate treatment strategies, such as those offering sustained effectiveness over 24-hours, may aid in negating the negative impact of morning symptoms.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Impact of morning allergy symptoms on the day ahead. Percentage of respondents who replied to the question “What impact do your allergies have on your day ahead?”
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig3: Impact of morning allergy symptoms on the day ahead. Percentage of respondents who replied to the question “What impact do your allergies have on your day ahead?”

Mentions: The impact of morning symptoms on mood was analysed by the time of day that the symptoms were most severe (Figure 2). Respondents who reported that their symptoms were most severe during the morning were more likely to report that their condition made them “grumpy,” “moody,” and “frustrated.” Conversely, people who suffered more at other times of the day (including the night time) were more likely to report feeling “irritable” and “tired and exhausted.” The negative impact of morning allergy symptoms also extended to how people behaved during the day (Figure 3), with a significant impact on usual morning behavioural patterns (“dreading public transport,” “feeling the need to explain that you are not sick”, and “being less affectionate with partner and children”).


The psychosocial impact of self-reported morning allergy symptoms: findings from an Australian internet-based survey.

Sharp TJ, Seeto C - J Allergy (Cairo) (2010)

Impact of morning allergy symptoms on the day ahead. Percentage of respondents who replied to the question “What impact do your allergies have on your day ahead?”
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2957588&req=5

fig3: Impact of morning allergy symptoms on the day ahead. Percentage of respondents who replied to the question “What impact do your allergies have on your day ahead?”
Mentions: The impact of morning symptoms on mood was analysed by the time of day that the symptoms were most severe (Figure 2). Respondents who reported that their symptoms were most severe during the morning were more likely to report that their condition made them “grumpy,” “moody,” and “frustrated.” Conversely, people who suffered more at other times of the day (including the night time) were more likely to report feeling “irritable” and “tired and exhausted.” The negative impact of morning allergy symptoms also extended to how people behaved during the day (Figure 3), with a significant impact on usual morning behavioural patterns (“dreading public transport,” “feeling the need to explain that you are not sick”, and “being less affectionate with partner and children”).

Bottom Line: Results.Discussion.Encouraging consumers with self-diagnosed AR to seek formal diagnosis and offering appropriate treatment strategies, such as those offering sustained effectiveness over 24-hours, may aid in negating the negative impact of morning symptoms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: RMIT School of Health Sciences, Melbourne, VIC 3083, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Background. Allergies can substantially impact health-related quality of life (HRQL). We investigated the psychosocial impact of morning symptoms amongst Australian adults with self-reported allergic rhinitis (AR). Method. An online survey comprising 24 questions was conducted in August 2008. Inclusion criteria were age (20-49 years) and self-reported moderate to severe symptoms of AR. Results. One thousand sixty respondents met the inclusion criteria. Amongst consumers with self-reported AR, symptoms were more severe in the morning in 597 (56%) and affected mood in 1025 (97%). Nine hundred seventy (91%) indicated that their symptoms had some impact on their day ahead and 868 (82%) reported a negative impact on relationships. Morning symptoms in particular had a substantial affect on mood for the day. HRQL impact was more pronounced in those who reported severe symptoms and in females. Discussion. Encouraging consumers with self-diagnosed AR to seek formal diagnosis and offering appropriate treatment strategies, such as those offering sustained effectiveness over 24-hours, may aid in negating the negative impact of morning symptoms.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus