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Sex Disparity in Food Allergy: Evidence from the PubMed Database.

Kelly C, Gangur V - J Allergy (Cairo) (2009)

Bottom Line: We performed a systematic search of the PubMed literature for IgE-mediated allergy to 11 allergenic foods of international regulatory importance.No date restriction was used and only articles in English were considered.Whereas among children with food allergies, 64.35% were males and 35.65% were females (male/female ratio, 1.80), among adults 34.82% were males and 65.18% were females (male/female ratio, 0.53).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Nutritional Immunology Program, Food Allergy and Immunology Laboratory, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA.

ABSTRACT
Food allergies are potentially fatal immune-mediated disorders that are growing globally. The relationship between sex and food allergy remains incompletely understood. Here we tested the hypothesis that, should sex influence the clinical response to food allergens, this would be reflected by a sex disparity in published studies of food allergy. We performed a systematic search of the PubMed literature for IgE-mediated allergy to 11 allergenic foods of international regulatory importance. No date restriction was used and only articles in English were considered. Of the 4744 articles retrieved, 591 met the inclusion criteria representing 17528 subjects with food allergies. Whereas among children with food allergies, 64.35% were males and 35.65% were females (male/female ratio, 1.80), among adults 34.82% were males and 65.18% were females (male/female ratio, 0.53). Consequently, these data argue that there is need for further investigation to define the role of sex in the pathogenesis of food allergy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Sex disparity in food allergy over the human life-span. These data show the percent males with food allergy over the human life-span. There is disproportionate representation of males during early life and females during middle age among humans in the food allergy literature accessed with the PubMed database. A notable cross-over in the sex ratio occurs during the teen years and the sex disparity is diminished in age categories after 50 years.
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fig2: Sex disparity in food allergy over the human life-span. These data show the percent males with food allergy over the human life-span. There is disproportionate representation of males during early life and females during middle age among humans in the food allergy literature accessed with the PubMed database. A notable cross-over in the sex ratio occurs during the teen years and the sex disparity is diminished in age categories after 50 years.

Mentions: Our search of the PubMed database returned 4744 articles. Of these, 591 met the inclusion criteria, representing 17,528 food-allergic individuals. Analysis by age and sex revealed a sex bias in food allergy reporting (Figure 1). Among the food allergic children (<18 years age) included in the analysis, 9159 (64.35%) were male and 5075 (35.65%) were female (male/female ratio of 1.80). Of the adults (≥18 years age) 1147 (34.82%) were male and 2147 (65.18%) were female (male/female ratio of 0.53). When information on specific ages was available, the data were further analyzed by classifying subjects into subgroups of age with five-year increments (Figure 2). This analysis once again revealed a sex disparity in food allergy reporting, in which males predominated at 0–4, 5–9, and 10–14 years age groups. No difference was apparent in the sex distribution in the 15–19 years age group. In older age groups most food allergy reporting was among females, until the age of 50–54 years, at which point the food allergy reporting was similar in both sexes (chi-squared for trend, P < .001). Age at onset of food allergy was used in the analysis when information was available. The reporting of childhood onset of food allergy was similar in males (5.84% among males) and females (5.12% among females).


Sex Disparity in Food Allergy: Evidence from the PubMed Database.

Kelly C, Gangur V - J Allergy (Cairo) (2009)

Sex disparity in food allergy over the human life-span. These data show the percent males with food allergy over the human life-span. There is disproportionate representation of males during early life and females during middle age among humans in the food allergy literature accessed with the PubMed database. A notable cross-over in the sex ratio occurs during the teen years and the sex disparity is diminished in age categories after 50 years.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2957586&req=5

fig2: Sex disparity in food allergy over the human life-span. These data show the percent males with food allergy over the human life-span. There is disproportionate representation of males during early life and females during middle age among humans in the food allergy literature accessed with the PubMed database. A notable cross-over in the sex ratio occurs during the teen years and the sex disparity is diminished in age categories after 50 years.
Mentions: Our search of the PubMed database returned 4744 articles. Of these, 591 met the inclusion criteria, representing 17,528 food-allergic individuals. Analysis by age and sex revealed a sex bias in food allergy reporting (Figure 1). Among the food allergic children (<18 years age) included in the analysis, 9159 (64.35%) were male and 5075 (35.65%) were female (male/female ratio of 1.80). Of the adults (≥18 years age) 1147 (34.82%) were male and 2147 (65.18%) were female (male/female ratio of 0.53). When information on specific ages was available, the data were further analyzed by classifying subjects into subgroups of age with five-year increments (Figure 2). This analysis once again revealed a sex disparity in food allergy reporting, in which males predominated at 0–4, 5–9, and 10–14 years age groups. No difference was apparent in the sex distribution in the 15–19 years age group. In older age groups most food allergy reporting was among females, until the age of 50–54 years, at which point the food allergy reporting was similar in both sexes (chi-squared for trend, P < .001). Age at onset of food allergy was used in the analysis when information was available. The reporting of childhood onset of food allergy was similar in males (5.84% among males) and females (5.12% among females).

Bottom Line: We performed a systematic search of the PubMed literature for IgE-mediated allergy to 11 allergenic foods of international regulatory importance.No date restriction was used and only articles in English were considered.Whereas among children with food allergies, 64.35% were males and 35.65% were females (male/female ratio, 1.80), among adults 34.82% were males and 65.18% were females (male/female ratio, 0.53).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Nutritional Immunology Program, Food Allergy and Immunology Laboratory, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA.

ABSTRACT
Food allergies are potentially fatal immune-mediated disorders that are growing globally. The relationship between sex and food allergy remains incompletely understood. Here we tested the hypothesis that, should sex influence the clinical response to food allergens, this would be reflected by a sex disparity in published studies of food allergy. We performed a systematic search of the PubMed literature for IgE-mediated allergy to 11 allergenic foods of international regulatory importance. No date restriction was used and only articles in English were considered. Of the 4744 articles retrieved, 591 met the inclusion criteria representing 17528 subjects with food allergies. Whereas among children with food allergies, 64.35% were males and 35.65% were females (male/female ratio, 1.80), among adults 34.82% were males and 65.18% were females (male/female ratio, 0.53). Consequently, these data argue that there is need for further investigation to define the role of sex in the pathogenesis of food allergy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus