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School-Based Screening: A Population-Based Approach to Inform and Monitor Children's Mental Health Needs.

Dowdy E, Ritchey K, Kamphaus RW - School Ment Health (2010)

Bottom Line: Efforts to move school psychological services from reactive and individual, to preventive and universal are ongoing.To further service delivery change, school-based mental health professionals can engage in systematic periodic mental health screening of all children.As continued changes to service delivery are imminent, information on how to utilize school-based screening data will be particularly valuable to mental health professionals working with or within schools.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
School-based mental health professionals often conduct assessments and provide interventions on an individual basis to students with significant needs. However, due to increasingly limited resources and continuing high levels of need, a shift in service delivery is warranted. Efforts to move school psychological services from reactive and individual, to preventive and universal are ongoing. To further service delivery change, school-based mental health professionals can engage in systematic periodic mental health screening of all children. This article will (a) discuss screening for risk of emotional and behavior problems from a population-based approach, (b) describe how screening data can identify and monitor the needs of students, schools, and communities, and (c) provide future directions for screening practices. As continued changes to service delivery are imminent, information on how to utilize school-based screening data will be particularly valuable to mental health professionals working with or within schools.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Example of longitudinal population-based monitoring. Percentage of students by grade level and survey cohort year who seriously considered suicide during the 12 months before the survey from Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey 1999–2005. Survey results from 1999 (Kann 2001), 2001 (Gruenbaum et al. 2002), 2003 (Gruenbaum et al. 2004), and 2005 (Eaton et al. 2006) Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Summaries
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Fig1: Example of longitudinal population-based monitoring. Percentage of students by grade level and survey cohort year who seriously considered suicide during the 12 months before the survey from Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey 1999–2005. Survey results from 1999 (Kann 2001), 2001 (Gruenbaum et al. 2002), 2003 (Gruenbaum et al. 2004), and 2005 (Eaton et al. 2006) Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Summaries

Mentions: Data from the YRBSS can also be analyzed across time points to provide some indication of overall and within-cohort trends. Since the YRBSS is given biannually, students that are initially surveyed in the 9th grade will be re-assessed in the 11th grade, and those assessed in 10th grade will be surveyed again during 12th grade (See Fig. 1). For example, from 2003 to 2005, the students who reported seriously considering suicide decreased among both cohorts sampled; students that advanced from 9th to 11th grade decreased from 20.8 to 16.8% and students that advanced from 10th to 12th decreased from 19.0.9 to 14.8%. This continuity of respondents can provide information regarding changes among cohorts across time, which may serve as an indicator of whether the population-based services being employed are effective.Fig. 1


School-Based Screening: A Population-Based Approach to Inform and Monitor Children's Mental Health Needs.

Dowdy E, Ritchey K, Kamphaus RW - School Ment Health (2010)

Example of longitudinal population-based monitoring. Percentage of students by grade level and survey cohort year who seriously considered suicide during the 12 months before the survey from Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey 1999–2005. Survey results from 1999 (Kann 2001), 2001 (Gruenbaum et al. 2002), 2003 (Gruenbaum et al. 2004), and 2005 (Eaton et al. 2006) Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Summaries
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2957575&req=5

Fig1: Example of longitudinal population-based monitoring. Percentage of students by grade level and survey cohort year who seriously considered suicide during the 12 months before the survey from Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey 1999–2005. Survey results from 1999 (Kann 2001), 2001 (Gruenbaum et al. 2002), 2003 (Gruenbaum et al. 2004), and 2005 (Eaton et al. 2006) Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Summaries
Mentions: Data from the YRBSS can also be analyzed across time points to provide some indication of overall and within-cohort trends. Since the YRBSS is given biannually, students that are initially surveyed in the 9th grade will be re-assessed in the 11th grade, and those assessed in 10th grade will be surveyed again during 12th grade (See Fig. 1). For example, from 2003 to 2005, the students who reported seriously considering suicide decreased among both cohorts sampled; students that advanced from 9th to 11th grade decreased from 20.8 to 16.8% and students that advanced from 10th to 12th decreased from 19.0.9 to 14.8%. This continuity of respondents can provide information regarding changes among cohorts across time, which may serve as an indicator of whether the population-based services being employed are effective.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Efforts to move school psychological services from reactive and individual, to preventive and universal are ongoing.To further service delivery change, school-based mental health professionals can engage in systematic periodic mental health screening of all children.As continued changes to service delivery are imminent, information on how to utilize school-based screening data will be particularly valuable to mental health professionals working with or within schools.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
School-based mental health professionals often conduct assessments and provide interventions on an individual basis to students with significant needs. However, due to increasingly limited resources and continuing high levels of need, a shift in service delivery is warranted. Efforts to move school psychological services from reactive and individual, to preventive and universal are ongoing. To further service delivery change, school-based mental health professionals can engage in systematic periodic mental health screening of all children. This article will (a) discuss screening for risk of emotional and behavior problems from a population-based approach, (b) describe how screening data can identify and monitor the needs of students, schools, and communities, and (c) provide future directions for screening practices. As continued changes to service delivery are imminent, information on how to utilize school-based screening data will be particularly valuable to mental health professionals working with or within schools.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus