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Integration of IEEE 1451 and HL7 exchanging information for patients' sensor data.

Kim W, Lim S, Ahn J, Nah J, Kim N - J Med Syst (2009)

Bottom Line: However, the HL7 standard does not support effective methods for treating data from various medical sensors, especially from mobile sensors.As ubiquitous systems are growing, HL7 must communicate with various medical transducers.After we present a method to integrate them and show the preliminary results of this approach.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Information and Communication Engineering, Sejong University, Seoul, South Korea. wskim@sejong.ac.kr

ABSTRACT
HL7 (Health Level 7) is a standard developed for exchanging incompatible healthcare information generated from programs or devices among heterogenous medical information systems. At present, HL7 is growing as a global standard. However, the HL7 standard does not support effective methods for treating data from various medical sensors, especially from mobile sensors. As ubiquitous systems are growing, HL7 must communicate with various medical transducers. In the area of sensor fields, IEEE 1451 is a group of standards for controlling transducers and for communicating data from/to various transducers. In this paper, we present the possibility of interoperability between the two standards, i.e., HL7 and IEEE 1451. After we present a method to integrate them and show the preliminary results of this approach.

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IEEE 1451 family of standards
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Fig2: IEEE 1451 family of standards

Mentions: IEEE 1451 is composed of several standards. The relationship among these standards is shown in Fig. 2. Among the standards that compose the IEEE family of standards, 1451.0 is the most important. This standard provides a common framework or all the standards in the IEEE 1451 family to be interoperable. It defines the functions that are performed by a smart transducer interface module (STIM) and the common characteristics for all devices that implement the STIM. It also specifies the formats for Transducer Electronic Data Sheets (TEDS) and defines various commands to facilitate the setup and control of the STIM as well as reading and writing of the data used by the system and the STIMs. Application programming interfaces (APIs) are defined to facilitate communications with the STIM and with other applications. IEEE 1451.1 defines a common object model and programming paradigm for smart transducer systems. IEEE 1451.2 characterizes a transducers-to-NCAP interface and TEDS for a point-to-point configuration [1]. IEEE 1451.3 defines a transducer-to-NCAP interface and TEDS for multi-drop transducers using the Home PNA (Home Phoneline Networking Alliance) communication protocol. IEEE 1451.4 defines a mixed-mode interface for analog transducers with analog and digital operating modes. IEEE 1451.5 has recently been approved and defines a transducer-to-NCAP interface and TEDS for wireless transducers. Wireless standards such as 802.11 (WiFi), 802.15.1 (Bluetooth), 802.15.4 (ZigBee), and 6LowPAN are being considered as physical interfaces [1, 4]. The IEEE P1451.6 defines a transducer-to-NCAP interface and TEDS using the high-speed CANopen network interface [1]. In addition to these, the IEEE P1451.7 defines an interface and communication protocol between transducers and RFID systems.Fig. 2


Integration of IEEE 1451 and HL7 exchanging information for patients' sensor data.

Kim W, Lim S, Ahn J, Nah J, Kim N - J Med Syst (2009)

IEEE 1451 family of standards
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2957570&req=5

Fig2: IEEE 1451 family of standards
Mentions: IEEE 1451 is composed of several standards. The relationship among these standards is shown in Fig. 2. Among the standards that compose the IEEE family of standards, 1451.0 is the most important. This standard provides a common framework or all the standards in the IEEE 1451 family to be interoperable. It defines the functions that are performed by a smart transducer interface module (STIM) and the common characteristics for all devices that implement the STIM. It also specifies the formats for Transducer Electronic Data Sheets (TEDS) and defines various commands to facilitate the setup and control of the STIM as well as reading and writing of the data used by the system and the STIMs. Application programming interfaces (APIs) are defined to facilitate communications with the STIM and with other applications. IEEE 1451.1 defines a common object model and programming paradigm for smart transducer systems. IEEE 1451.2 characterizes a transducers-to-NCAP interface and TEDS for a point-to-point configuration [1]. IEEE 1451.3 defines a transducer-to-NCAP interface and TEDS for multi-drop transducers using the Home PNA (Home Phoneline Networking Alliance) communication protocol. IEEE 1451.4 defines a mixed-mode interface for analog transducers with analog and digital operating modes. IEEE 1451.5 has recently been approved and defines a transducer-to-NCAP interface and TEDS for wireless transducers. Wireless standards such as 802.11 (WiFi), 802.15.1 (Bluetooth), 802.15.4 (ZigBee), and 6LowPAN are being considered as physical interfaces [1, 4]. The IEEE P1451.6 defines a transducer-to-NCAP interface and TEDS using the high-speed CANopen network interface [1]. In addition to these, the IEEE P1451.7 defines an interface and communication protocol between transducers and RFID systems.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: However, the HL7 standard does not support effective methods for treating data from various medical sensors, especially from mobile sensors.As ubiquitous systems are growing, HL7 must communicate with various medical transducers.After we present a method to integrate them and show the preliminary results of this approach.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Information and Communication Engineering, Sejong University, Seoul, South Korea. wskim@sejong.ac.kr

ABSTRACT
HL7 (Health Level 7) is a standard developed for exchanging incompatible healthcare information generated from programs or devices among heterogenous medical information systems. At present, HL7 is growing as a global standard. However, the HL7 standard does not support effective methods for treating data from various medical sensors, especially from mobile sensors. As ubiquitous systems are growing, HL7 must communicate with various medical transducers. In the area of sensor fields, IEEE 1451 is a group of standards for controlling transducers and for communicating data from/to various transducers. In this paper, we present the possibility of interoperability between the two standards, i.e., HL7 and IEEE 1451. After we present a method to integrate them and show the preliminary results of this approach.

Show MeSH