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Does kin recognition and sib-mating avoidance limit the risk of genetic incompatibility in a parasitic wasp?

Metzger M, Bernstein C, Hoffmeister TS, Desouhant E - PLoS ONE (2010)

Bottom Line: In contrast, in choice tests in small test arenas, no kin discrimination effect was observed.Our results are compatible with the genetic incompatibility hypothesis.They suggest that the female wasps recognize sibs on the basis of a chemical signature carried or emitted by males possibly using a "self-referent phenotype matching" mechanism.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratoire de Biométrie et Biologie Evolutive, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS, UMR 5558, Villeurbanne, France.

ABSTRACT

Background: When some combinations of maternal and paternal alleles have a detrimental effect on offspring fitness, females should be able to choose mates on the basis of their genetic compatibility. In numerous Hymenoptera, the sex of an individual depends of the allelic combination at a specific locus (single-locus Complementary Sex Determination), and in most of these species individuals that are homozygous at this sexual locus develop into diploid males with zero fitness.

Methods and findings: In this paper, we tested the hypothesis of genetic incompatibility avoidance by investigating sib-mating avoidance in the solitary wasp parasitoid, Venturia canescens. In the context of mate choice we show, for the first time in a non-social hymenopteran species, that females can avoid mating with their brothers through kin recognition. In "no-choice" tests, the probability a female will mate with an unrelated male is twice as high as the chance of her mating with her brothers. In contrast, in choice tests in small test arenas, no kin discrimination effect was observed. Further experiments with male extracts demonstrate that chemical cues emanating from related males influence the acceptance rate of unrelated males.

Conclusions: Our results are compatible with the genetic incompatibility hypothesis. They suggest that the female wasps recognize sibs on the basis of a chemical signature carried or emitted by males possibly using a "self-referent phenotype matching" mechanism.

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Percentage of females accepting to mate with a non-sib male according to their relatedness with the male extract (N = 32/treatment; experiment 3).* : p<0.05.
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pone-0013505-g002: Percentage of females accepting to mate with a non-sib male according to their relatedness with the male extract (N = 32/treatment; experiment 3).* : p<0.05.

Mentions: Matings with the non-sib male were less frequent when the pair perceived the chemical extract of a sib male than in the presence of a non-sib male extract (Treatment factor: χ2 = 6.09, df = 2, p = 0.048, “non sib” vs. “sib”: Z = 2.332, p = 0.0197, Figure 2). Being exposed to an extract of non-sib males had no effect on the proportion of females accepting to mate with the non sib male (“control” vs. “non sib” extracts, Z = 0.758, p = 0.44).


Does kin recognition and sib-mating avoidance limit the risk of genetic incompatibility in a parasitic wasp?

Metzger M, Bernstein C, Hoffmeister TS, Desouhant E - PLoS ONE (2010)

Percentage of females accepting to mate with a non-sib male according to their relatedness with the male extract (N = 32/treatment; experiment 3).* : p<0.05.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2957437&req=5

pone-0013505-g002: Percentage of females accepting to mate with a non-sib male according to their relatedness with the male extract (N = 32/treatment; experiment 3).* : p<0.05.
Mentions: Matings with the non-sib male were less frequent when the pair perceived the chemical extract of a sib male than in the presence of a non-sib male extract (Treatment factor: χ2 = 6.09, df = 2, p = 0.048, “non sib” vs. “sib”: Z = 2.332, p = 0.0197, Figure 2). Being exposed to an extract of non-sib males had no effect on the proportion of females accepting to mate with the non sib male (“control” vs. “non sib” extracts, Z = 0.758, p = 0.44).

Bottom Line: In contrast, in choice tests in small test arenas, no kin discrimination effect was observed.Our results are compatible with the genetic incompatibility hypothesis.They suggest that the female wasps recognize sibs on the basis of a chemical signature carried or emitted by males possibly using a "self-referent phenotype matching" mechanism.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratoire de Biométrie et Biologie Evolutive, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS, UMR 5558, Villeurbanne, France.

ABSTRACT

Background: When some combinations of maternal and paternal alleles have a detrimental effect on offspring fitness, females should be able to choose mates on the basis of their genetic compatibility. In numerous Hymenoptera, the sex of an individual depends of the allelic combination at a specific locus (single-locus Complementary Sex Determination), and in most of these species individuals that are homozygous at this sexual locus develop into diploid males with zero fitness.

Methods and findings: In this paper, we tested the hypothesis of genetic incompatibility avoidance by investigating sib-mating avoidance in the solitary wasp parasitoid, Venturia canescens. In the context of mate choice we show, for the first time in a non-social hymenopteran species, that females can avoid mating with their brothers through kin recognition. In "no-choice" tests, the probability a female will mate with an unrelated male is twice as high as the chance of her mating with her brothers. In contrast, in choice tests in small test arenas, no kin discrimination effect was observed. Further experiments with male extracts demonstrate that chemical cues emanating from related males influence the acceptance rate of unrelated males.

Conclusions: Our results are compatible with the genetic incompatibility hypothesis. They suggest that the female wasps recognize sibs on the basis of a chemical signature carried or emitted by males possibly using a "self-referent phenotype matching" mechanism.

Show MeSH