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Effects of moderate-volume, high-load lower-body resistance training on strength and function in persons with Parkinson's disease: a pilot study.

Schilling BK, Pfeiffer RF, Ledoux MS, Karlage RE, Bloomer RJ, Falvo MJ - Parkinsons Dis (2010)

Bottom Line: There was a significant group-by-time effect for maximum leg press strength relative to body mass, with the training group significantly increasing their maximum relative strength (P < .05).Conclusions.Moderate volume, high-load weight training is effective for increasing lower-body strength in persons with PD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Exercise Neuromechanics Laboratory, The University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152, USA.

ABSTRACT
Background. Resistance training research has demonstrated positive effects for persons with Parkinson's disease (PD), but the number of acute training variables that can be manipulated makes it difficult to determine the optimal resistance training program. Objective. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of an 8-week resistance training intervention on strength and function in persons with PD. Methods. Eighteen men and women were randomized to training or standard care for the 8-week intervention. The training group performed 3 sets of 5-8 repetitions of the leg press, leg curl, and calf press twice weekly. Tests included leg press strength relative to body mass, timed up-and-go, six-minute walk, and Activities-specific Balance Confidence questionnaire. Results. There was a significant group-by-time effect for maximum leg press strength relative to body mass, with the training group significantly increasing their maximum relative strength (P < .05). No other significant interactions were noted (P > .05). Conclusions. Moderate volume, high-load weight training is effective for increasing lower-body strength in persons with PD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

TUG (s) for TRN (Pre = 5.8 ± 0.50, Post 5.7 ± 0.80) and CNTL (Pre = 7.5 ± 1.18, Post 6.75 ± 1.21). No significant interaction (P = .223) or time effect (P = .069) was noted.
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fig2: TUG (s) for TRN (Pre = 5.8 ± 0.50, Post 5.7 ± 0.80) and CNTL (Pre = 7.5 ± 1.18, Post 6.75 ± 1.21). No significant interaction (P = .223) or time effect (P = .069) was noted.

Mentions: Fifteen subjects completed the intervention. One individual from the training group and two in the control group opted not to complete the study for personal/physical reasons unrelated to the study itself. Subject descriptive data are shown in Table 1. No significant differences between groups were noted at baseline. There was a significant group-by-time interaction for relative (P = .001) and absolute (P = .001) leg press strength. Training resulted in a significant increase in relative leg press (kg/kg) 1-RM (Pre = 2.1 ± 0.6, Post = 2.7 ± 0.7), P < .001, ES = 0.9, Figure 1). Absolute strength also increased significantly in the training group (Pre = 161.0 ± 66.9 kg, Post = 199.9 ± 67.8 kg, P < .001, ES = 0.6). In contrast, no changes were noted in relative strength for the control group (Pre = 2.0 ± 0.7, Post = 2.0 ± 0.7. Data from the control group indicate that strength appears stable over the short term (8 weeks) in persons with PD. No significant interaction (P = .223) or time effect (P = .07) was noted for TUG (TRN: Pre = 5.8 ±  0.50, Post = 5.7 ± 0.80, ES = 0.2, CNTL: Pre = 7.5 ± 1.2, Post = 6.8 ± 1.2, ES = 0.6, Figure 2). No significant interaction was noted (P = .296), but a significant time effect was noted (P = .005) for six minute walk distance (Pre = 503.3 ± 85.7, Post 540.4 ± 57.7, ES = 0.5 Figure 3). No significant interaction (P = .381) or time effect (P = .664) was noted for ABC scores (TRN; Pre = 86.2 ± 7.5, Post 89.5 ± 9.0, ES = 0.4, CNTL; Pre = 83.9 ± 13.4, Post 82.8 ± 17.5, ES = 0.1, Figure 4).


Effects of moderate-volume, high-load lower-body resistance training on strength and function in persons with Parkinson's disease: a pilot study.

Schilling BK, Pfeiffer RF, Ledoux MS, Karlage RE, Bloomer RJ, Falvo MJ - Parkinsons Dis (2010)

TUG (s) for TRN (Pre = 5.8 ± 0.50, Post 5.7 ± 0.80) and CNTL (Pre = 7.5 ± 1.18, Post 6.75 ± 1.21). No significant interaction (P = .223) or time effect (P = .069) was noted.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2957327&req=5

fig2: TUG (s) for TRN (Pre = 5.8 ± 0.50, Post 5.7 ± 0.80) and CNTL (Pre = 7.5 ± 1.18, Post 6.75 ± 1.21). No significant interaction (P = .223) or time effect (P = .069) was noted.
Mentions: Fifteen subjects completed the intervention. One individual from the training group and two in the control group opted not to complete the study for personal/physical reasons unrelated to the study itself. Subject descriptive data are shown in Table 1. No significant differences between groups were noted at baseline. There was a significant group-by-time interaction for relative (P = .001) and absolute (P = .001) leg press strength. Training resulted in a significant increase in relative leg press (kg/kg) 1-RM (Pre = 2.1 ± 0.6, Post = 2.7 ± 0.7), P < .001, ES = 0.9, Figure 1). Absolute strength also increased significantly in the training group (Pre = 161.0 ± 66.9 kg, Post = 199.9 ± 67.8 kg, P < .001, ES = 0.6). In contrast, no changes were noted in relative strength for the control group (Pre = 2.0 ± 0.7, Post = 2.0 ± 0.7. Data from the control group indicate that strength appears stable over the short term (8 weeks) in persons with PD. No significant interaction (P = .223) or time effect (P = .07) was noted for TUG (TRN: Pre = 5.8 ±  0.50, Post = 5.7 ± 0.80, ES = 0.2, CNTL: Pre = 7.5 ± 1.2, Post = 6.8 ± 1.2, ES = 0.6, Figure 2). No significant interaction was noted (P = .296), but a significant time effect was noted (P = .005) for six minute walk distance (Pre = 503.3 ± 85.7, Post 540.4 ± 57.7, ES = 0.5 Figure 3). No significant interaction (P = .381) or time effect (P = .664) was noted for ABC scores (TRN; Pre = 86.2 ± 7.5, Post 89.5 ± 9.0, ES = 0.4, CNTL; Pre = 83.9 ± 13.4, Post 82.8 ± 17.5, ES = 0.1, Figure 4).

Bottom Line: There was a significant group-by-time effect for maximum leg press strength relative to body mass, with the training group significantly increasing their maximum relative strength (P < .05).Conclusions.Moderate volume, high-load weight training is effective for increasing lower-body strength in persons with PD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Exercise Neuromechanics Laboratory, The University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152, USA.

ABSTRACT
Background. Resistance training research has demonstrated positive effects for persons with Parkinson's disease (PD), but the number of acute training variables that can be manipulated makes it difficult to determine the optimal resistance training program. Objective. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of an 8-week resistance training intervention on strength and function in persons with PD. Methods. Eighteen men and women were randomized to training or standard care for the 8-week intervention. The training group performed 3 sets of 5-8 repetitions of the leg press, leg curl, and calf press twice weekly. Tests included leg press strength relative to body mass, timed up-and-go, six-minute walk, and Activities-specific Balance Confidence questionnaire. Results. There was a significant group-by-time effect for maximum leg press strength relative to body mass, with the training group significantly increasing their maximum relative strength (P < .05). No other significant interactions were noted (P > .05). Conclusions. Moderate volume, high-load weight training is effective for increasing lower-body strength in persons with PD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus