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Atomic layer deposition-based functionalization of materials for medical and environmental health applications.

Narayan RJ, Adiga SP, Pellin MJ, Curtiss LA, Hryn AJ, Stafslien S, Chisholm B, Shih CC, Shih CM, Lin SJ, Su YY, Jin C, Zhang J, Monteiro-Riviere NA, Elam JW - Philos Trans A Math Phys Eng Sci (2010)

Bottom Line: In addition, films deposited by means of atomic layer deposition may impart improved biological functionality to nanoporous alumina membranes.PEGylated nanoporous alumina membranes were prepared by self-assembly of 1-mercaptoundec-11-yl hexa(ethylene glycol) on platinum-coated nanoporous alumina membranes.The results of this work indicate that nanoporous alumina membranes may be modified using atomic layer deposition for use in a variety of medical and environmental health applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina and North Carolina State University, 2147 Burlington Engineering Labs, Raleigh, NC 27695-7115, USA. roger_narayan@msn.com

ABSTRACT
Nanoporous alumina membranes exhibit high pore densities, well-controlled and uniform pore sizes, as well as straight pores. Owing to these unusual properties, nanoporous alumina membranes are currently being considered for use in implantable sensor membranes and water purification membranes. Atomic layer deposition is a thin-film growth process that may be used to modify the pore size in a nanoporous alumina membrane while retaining a narrow pore distribution. In addition, films deposited by means of atomic layer deposition may impart improved biological functionality to nanoporous alumina membranes. In this study, zinc oxide coatings and platinum coatings were deposited on nanoporous alumina membranes by means of atomic layer deposition. PEGylated nanoporous alumina membranes were prepared by self-assembly of 1-mercaptoundec-11-yl hexa(ethylene glycol) on platinum-coated nanoporous alumina membranes. The pores of the PEGylated nanoporous alumina membranes remained free of fouling after exposure to human platelet-rich plasma; protein adsorption, fibrin networks and platelet aggregation were not observed on the coated membrane surface. Zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes demonstrated activity against two waterborne pathogens, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The results of this work indicate that nanoporous alumina membranes may be modified using atomic layer deposition for use in a variety of medical and environmental health applications.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

The 24 h MTT viability assay data for the uncoated 100 nm pore size nanoporous alumina membrane and the zinc oxide-coated (coating=5 nm) 100 nm pore size nanoporous alumina membrane. Data were standardized by the uncoated membrane control. The zinc oxide-coated membranes demonstrated higher viability than the uncoated membrane.
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RSTA20100011F14: The 24 h MTT viability assay data for the uncoated 100 nm pore size nanoporous alumina membrane and the zinc oxide-coated (coating=5 nm) 100 nm pore size nanoporous alumina membrane. Data were standardized by the uncoated membrane control. The zinc oxide-coated membranes demonstrated higher viability than the uncoated membrane.

Mentions: The 24 h MTT viability assay data for the uncoated 100 nm pore size nanoporous alumina membrane and the zinc oxide-coated (coating=5 nm) 100 nm pore size nanoporous alumina membrane are shown in figure 14. The data for the coated membrane were standardized by the data for the uncoated membrane. The zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes were shown to support higher cell viability than the uncoated nanoporous alumina membranes. It should be noted that Naji & Harmand (1991) previously used in vitro assays to confirm the cytocompatibility of amorphous alumina. The increase in cell proliferation may be attributed to cell interactions with released zinc ions. MacDonald (2000) indicated that Zn2+ activates mitogen-activated protein kinase, which is involved with cell proliferation. Chen et al. (1999) showed that zinc directly promotes DNA synthesis; zinc was shown to increase cell DNA content. Hershfinkel et al. (2001) demonstrated that human epidermal keratinocytes possess a functional extracellular zinc-sensing receptor; their work suggests that the detection of extracellular zinc results in activation of numerous signal transduction pathways and enhanced keratinocyte proliferation. Work by MacDonald (2000), McNeil et al. (1998) and Oda et al. (2000) also suggested that keratinocyte proliferation may be enhanced by zinc.


Atomic layer deposition-based functionalization of materials for medical and environmental health applications.

Narayan RJ, Adiga SP, Pellin MJ, Curtiss LA, Hryn AJ, Stafslien S, Chisholm B, Shih CC, Shih CM, Lin SJ, Su YY, Jin C, Zhang J, Monteiro-Riviere NA, Elam JW - Philos Trans A Math Phys Eng Sci (2010)

The 24 h MTT viability assay data for the uncoated 100 nm pore size nanoporous alumina membrane and the zinc oxide-coated (coating=5 nm) 100 nm pore size nanoporous alumina membrane. Data were standardized by the uncoated membrane control. The zinc oxide-coated membranes demonstrated higher viability than the uncoated membrane.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2944392&req=5

RSTA20100011F14: The 24 h MTT viability assay data for the uncoated 100 nm pore size nanoporous alumina membrane and the zinc oxide-coated (coating=5 nm) 100 nm pore size nanoporous alumina membrane. Data were standardized by the uncoated membrane control. The zinc oxide-coated membranes demonstrated higher viability than the uncoated membrane.
Mentions: The 24 h MTT viability assay data for the uncoated 100 nm pore size nanoporous alumina membrane and the zinc oxide-coated (coating=5 nm) 100 nm pore size nanoporous alumina membrane are shown in figure 14. The data for the coated membrane were standardized by the data for the uncoated membrane. The zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes were shown to support higher cell viability than the uncoated nanoporous alumina membranes. It should be noted that Naji & Harmand (1991) previously used in vitro assays to confirm the cytocompatibility of amorphous alumina. The increase in cell proliferation may be attributed to cell interactions with released zinc ions. MacDonald (2000) indicated that Zn2+ activates mitogen-activated protein kinase, which is involved with cell proliferation. Chen et al. (1999) showed that zinc directly promotes DNA synthesis; zinc was shown to increase cell DNA content. Hershfinkel et al. (2001) demonstrated that human epidermal keratinocytes possess a functional extracellular zinc-sensing receptor; their work suggests that the detection of extracellular zinc results in activation of numerous signal transduction pathways and enhanced keratinocyte proliferation. Work by MacDonald (2000), McNeil et al. (1998) and Oda et al. (2000) also suggested that keratinocyte proliferation may be enhanced by zinc.

Bottom Line: In addition, films deposited by means of atomic layer deposition may impart improved biological functionality to nanoporous alumina membranes.PEGylated nanoporous alumina membranes were prepared by self-assembly of 1-mercaptoundec-11-yl hexa(ethylene glycol) on platinum-coated nanoporous alumina membranes.The results of this work indicate that nanoporous alumina membranes may be modified using atomic layer deposition for use in a variety of medical and environmental health applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina and North Carolina State University, 2147 Burlington Engineering Labs, Raleigh, NC 27695-7115, USA. roger_narayan@msn.com

ABSTRACT
Nanoporous alumina membranes exhibit high pore densities, well-controlled and uniform pore sizes, as well as straight pores. Owing to these unusual properties, nanoporous alumina membranes are currently being considered for use in implantable sensor membranes and water purification membranes. Atomic layer deposition is a thin-film growth process that may be used to modify the pore size in a nanoporous alumina membrane while retaining a narrow pore distribution. In addition, films deposited by means of atomic layer deposition may impart improved biological functionality to nanoporous alumina membranes. In this study, zinc oxide coatings and platinum coatings were deposited on nanoporous alumina membranes by means of atomic layer deposition. PEGylated nanoporous alumina membranes were prepared by self-assembly of 1-mercaptoundec-11-yl hexa(ethylene glycol) on platinum-coated nanoporous alumina membranes. The pores of the PEGylated nanoporous alumina membranes remained free of fouling after exposure to human platelet-rich plasma; protein adsorption, fibrin networks and platelet aggregation were not observed on the coated membrane surface. Zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes demonstrated activity against two waterborne pathogens, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The results of this work indicate that nanoporous alumina membranes may be modified using atomic layer deposition for use in a variety of medical and environmental health applications.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus