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Depression as a predictor of work resumption following myocardial infarction (MI): a review of recent research evidence.

O'Neil A, Sanderson K, Oldenburg B - Health Qual Life Outcomes (2010)

Bottom Line: Results from included articles were then evaluated for quality and analysed by comparing effect size.Other common significant predictors of RTW were age and patient perceptions of their illness and work performance.As work is a major component of Quality of Life (QOL), this finding has clinical, social, public health and economic implications in the modern era.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, 89 Commercial Road, Melbourne, Victoria 3004, Australia. adrienne.o'neil@med.monash.edu.au

ABSTRACT

Background: Depression often coexists with myocardial infarction (MI) and has been found to impede recovery through reduced functioning in key areas of life such as work. In an era of improved survival rates and extended working lives, we review whether depression remains a predictor of poorer work outcomes following MI by systematically reviewing literature from the past 15 years.

Methods: Articles were identified using medical, health, occupational and social science databases, including PubMed, OVID, Medline, Proquest, CINAHL plus, CCOHS, SCOPUS, Web of Knowledge, and the following pre-determined criteria were applied: (i) collection of depression measures (as distinct from 'psychological distress') and work status at baseline, (ii) examination and statistical analysis of predictors of work outcomes, (iii) inclusion of cohorts with patients exhibiting symptoms consistent with Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS), (iv) follow-up of work-specific and depression specific outcomes at minimum 6 months, (v) published in English over the past 15 years. Results from included articles were then evaluated for quality and analysed by comparing effect size.

Results: Of the 12 articles meeting criteria, depression significantly predicted reduced likelihood of return to work (RTW) in the majority of studies (n = 7). Further, there was a trend suggesting that increased depression severity was associated with poorer RTW outcomes 6 to 12 months after a cardiac event. Other common significant predictors of RTW were age and patient perceptions of their illness and work performance.

Conclusion: Depression is a predictor of work resumption post-MI. As work is a major component of Quality of Life (QOL), this finding has clinical, social, public health and economic implications in the modern era. Targeted depression interventions could facilitate RTW post-MI.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Flowchart of search strategy results.
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Figure 1: Flowchart of search strategy results.

Mentions: Initial searches were conducted independently by AO and CR, yielding 1231 results; 309 of these articles were considered for inclusion from an initial review, and their abstracts obtained. After screening using the inclusion criteria, the full text of 31 articles were obtained and details of those appearing to meet criteria were recorded in extraction tables. The first author and reviewer convened to compare the results of their respective searches. After excluding 19 of the 31 studies initially considered to meet criteria, 12 articles were finally agreed upon by the two assessors for inclusion (initial assessor consensus was 93%; where consensus was not reached, the second author was consulted). Reasons for exclusion were: duplicate articles of the same study (n = 8), follow up period not long enough (n = 2), did not record depression using appropriate assessment techniques (n = 2), and did not analyse/present data on predictors of work outcomes (n = 7). Figure 1 displays the results of the search strategy, in alignment with PRISMA guidelines. Papers included in the review were those published in English between 1994 and July 2009. Each article for final inclusion in the review was subject to assessment using a quality assessment inventory (Additional file 1). Quality assessment ratings are displayed in Table 2, where each article was graded using these criteria. Seven of the 12 articles were considered high quality, four moderate quality and one low quality. Collectively, the most common features of the articles were: well defined inclusion criteria, measurement selection and baseline data collection point, and use of multivariate techniques for data analysis. The least common feature of the articles was the reporting of a representative sample (four articles reported recruiting samples with males only). While measurements used for data collection were clearly documented, in most instances a justification for selection was not given.


Depression as a predictor of work resumption following myocardial infarction (MI): a review of recent research evidence.

O'Neil A, Sanderson K, Oldenburg B - Health Qual Life Outcomes (2010)

Flowchart of search strategy results.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2944344&req=5

Figure 1: Flowchart of search strategy results.
Mentions: Initial searches were conducted independently by AO and CR, yielding 1231 results; 309 of these articles were considered for inclusion from an initial review, and their abstracts obtained. After screening using the inclusion criteria, the full text of 31 articles were obtained and details of those appearing to meet criteria were recorded in extraction tables. The first author and reviewer convened to compare the results of their respective searches. After excluding 19 of the 31 studies initially considered to meet criteria, 12 articles were finally agreed upon by the two assessors for inclusion (initial assessor consensus was 93%; where consensus was not reached, the second author was consulted). Reasons for exclusion were: duplicate articles of the same study (n = 8), follow up period not long enough (n = 2), did not record depression using appropriate assessment techniques (n = 2), and did not analyse/present data on predictors of work outcomes (n = 7). Figure 1 displays the results of the search strategy, in alignment with PRISMA guidelines. Papers included in the review were those published in English between 1994 and July 2009. Each article for final inclusion in the review was subject to assessment using a quality assessment inventory (Additional file 1). Quality assessment ratings are displayed in Table 2, where each article was graded using these criteria. Seven of the 12 articles were considered high quality, four moderate quality and one low quality. Collectively, the most common features of the articles were: well defined inclusion criteria, measurement selection and baseline data collection point, and use of multivariate techniques for data analysis. The least common feature of the articles was the reporting of a representative sample (four articles reported recruiting samples with males only). While measurements used for data collection were clearly documented, in most instances a justification for selection was not given.

Bottom Line: Results from included articles were then evaluated for quality and analysed by comparing effect size.Other common significant predictors of RTW were age and patient perceptions of their illness and work performance.As work is a major component of Quality of Life (QOL), this finding has clinical, social, public health and economic implications in the modern era.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, 89 Commercial Road, Melbourne, Victoria 3004, Australia. adrienne.o'neil@med.monash.edu.au

ABSTRACT

Background: Depression often coexists with myocardial infarction (MI) and has been found to impede recovery through reduced functioning in key areas of life such as work. In an era of improved survival rates and extended working lives, we review whether depression remains a predictor of poorer work outcomes following MI by systematically reviewing literature from the past 15 years.

Methods: Articles were identified using medical, health, occupational and social science databases, including PubMed, OVID, Medline, Proquest, CINAHL plus, CCOHS, SCOPUS, Web of Knowledge, and the following pre-determined criteria were applied: (i) collection of depression measures (as distinct from 'psychological distress') and work status at baseline, (ii) examination and statistical analysis of predictors of work outcomes, (iii) inclusion of cohorts with patients exhibiting symptoms consistent with Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS), (iv) follow-up of work-specific and depression specific outcomes at minimum 6 months, (v) published in English over the past 15 years. Results from included articles were then evaluated for quality and analysed by comparing effect size.

Results: Of the 12 articles meeting criteria, depression significantly predicted reduced likelihood of return to work (RTW) in the majority of studies (n = 7). Further, there was a trend suggesting that increased depression severity was associated with poorer RTW outcomes 6 to 12 months after a cardiac event. Other common significant predictors of RTW were age and patient perceptions of their illness and work performance.

Conclusion: Depression is a predictor of work resumption post-MI. As work is a major component of Quality of Life (QOL), this finding has clinical, social, public health and economic implications in the modern era. Targeted depression interventions could facilitate RTW post-MI.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus