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Effect of prenatal zinc supplementation on birthweight.

Saaka M, Oosthuizen J, Beatty S - J Health Popul Nutr (2009)

Bottom Line: Although iron and zinc deficiencies are known to occur together and also appear to be high in Ghana, a few supplementation studies addressed this concurrently in pregnancy.Overall, there was no detectable difference in the mean birthweight between the study groups, although the effect of iron-zinc supplementation on the mean birthweight was masked by a strong interaction between the type of supplement and the iron status of participants [F (1,179) = 5.614, p = 0.019].Prenatal iron-zinc supplementation was effective in increasing the mean birthweight among anaemic and iron-deficient women but not among women with elevated iron stores in early pregnancy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Exercise, Biomedical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, 100 Joondalup Drive, Joondalup, WA 6027, Australia. mahamasaaka@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT
Although iron and zinc deficiencies are known to occur together and also appear to be high in Ghana, a few supplementation studies addressed this concurrently in pregnancy. In a double-blind, randomized controlled trial, 600 pregnant women in Ghana were randomly assigned to receive either a combined supplement of 40 mg of zinc as zinc gluconate and 40 mg of iron as ferrous sulphate or 40 mg of elemental iron as ferrous sulphate. Overall, there was no detectable difference in the mean birthweight between the study groups, although the effect of iron-zinc supplementation on the mean birthweight was masked by a strong interaction between the type of supplement and the iron status of participants [F (1,179) = 5.614, p = 0.019]. Prenatal iron-zinc supplementation was effective in increasing the mean birthweight among anaemic and iron-deficient women but not among women with elevated iron stores in early pregnancy.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

A flow diagram showing the number of participants recruited, randomized, and lost-to-follow-up
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Figure 1: A flow diagram showing the number of participants recruited, randomized, and lost-to-follow-up

Mentions: The number of participants recruited, enrolled, and loss-to-follow-up is shown in the Figure.


Effect of prenatal zinc supplementation on birthweight.

Saaka M, Oosthuizen J, Beatty S - J Health Popul Nutr (2009)

A flow diagram showing the number of participants recruited, randomized, and lost-to-follow-up
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2928084&req=5

Figure 1: A flow diagram showing the number of participants recruited, randomized, and lost-to-follow-up
Mentions: The number of participants recruited, enrolled, and loss-to-follow-up is shown in the Figure.

Bottom Line: Although iron and zinc deficiencies are known to occur together and also appear to be high in Ghana, a few supplementation studies addressed this concurrently in pregnancy.Overall, there was no detectable difference in the mean birthweight between the study groups, although the effect of iron-zinc supplementation on the mean birthweight was masked by a strong interaction between the type of supplement and the iron status of participants [F (1,179) = 5.614, p = 0.019].Prenatal iron-zinc supplementation was effective in increasing the mean birthweight among anaemic and iron-deficient women but not among women with elevated iron stores in early pregnancy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Exercise, Biomedical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, 100 Joondalup Drive, Joondalup, WA 6027, Australia. mahamasaaka@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT
Although iron and zinc deficiencies are known to occur together and also appear to be high in Ghana, a few supplementation studies addressed this concurrently in pregnancy. In a double-blind, randomized controlled trial, 600 pregnant women in Ghana were randomly assigned to receive either a combined supplement of 40 mg of zinc as zinc gluconate and 40 mg of iron as ferrous sulphate or 40 mg of elemental iron as ferrous sulphate. Overall, there was no detectable difference in the mean birthweight between the study groups, although the effect of iron-zinc supplementation on the mean birthweight was masked by a strong interaction between the type of supplement and the iron status of participants [F (1,179) = 5.614, p = 0.019]. Prenatal iron-zinc supplementation was effective in increasing the mean birthweight among anaemic and iron-deficient women but not among women with elevated iron stores in early pregnancy.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus