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The redox enzyme p66Shc contributes to diabetes and ischemia-induced delay in cutaneous wound healing.

Fadini GP, Albiero M, Menegazzo L, Boscaro E, Pagnin E, Iori E, Cosma C, Lapolla A, Pengo V, Stendardo M, Agostini C, Pelicci PG, Giorgio M, Avogaro A - Diabetes (2010)

Bottom Line: Genetic deletion of p66Shc prolongs life span and protects against oxidative stress.Migration of p66Shc(-/-) dermal fibroblasts in vitro was significantly faster than WT fibroblasts under both high glucose and hypoxia. p66Shc is involved in the delayed wound-healing process in the setting of diabetes and ischemia.Thus, p66Shc may represent a potential therapeutic target against this disabling diabetes complication.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Padova Medical School, Padova, Italy. gianpaolofadini@hotmail.com

ABSTRACT

Objective: The redox enzyme p66Shc produces hydrogen peroxide and triggers proapoptotic signals. Genetic deletion of p66Shc prolongs life span and protects against oxidative stress. In the present study, we evaluated the role of p66Shc in an animal model of diabetic wound healing.

Research design and methods: Skin wounds were created in wild-type (WT) and p66Shc(-/-) control and streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice with or without hind limb ischemia. Wounds were assessed for collagen content, thickness and vascularity of granulation tissue, apoptosis, reepithelialization, and expression of c-myc and beta-catenin. Response to hind limb ischemia was also evaluated.

Results: Diabetes delayed wound healing in WT mice with reduced granulation tissue thickness and vascularity, increased apoptosis, epithelial expression of c-myc, and nuclear localization of beta-catenin. These nonhealing features were worsened by hind limb ischemia. Diabetes induced p66Shc expression and activation; wound healing was significantly faster in p66Shc(-/-) than in WT diabetic mice, with or without hind limb ischemia, at 1 and 3 months of diabetes duration and in both SV129 and C57BL/6 genetic backgrounds. Deletion of p66Shc reversed nonhealing features, with increased collagen content and granulation tissue thickness, and reduced apoptosis and expression of c-myc and beta-catenin. p66Shc deletion improved response to hind limb ischemia in diabetic mice in terms of tissue damage, capillary density, and perfusion. Migration of p66Shc(-/-) dermal fibroblasts in vitro was significantly faster than WT fibroblasts under both high glucose and hypoxia.

Conclusions: p66Shc is involved in the delayed wound-healing process in the setting of diabetes and ischemia. Thus, p66Shc may represent a potential therapeutic target against this disabling diabetes complication.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Biomarkers of glyco-oxidation. Blood A1C and skin concentration of nitrotyrosines (a marker of tissue oxidative stress) and pentosidine (a marker of advanced glycation) were determined by high-performance chromatography in wild-type (WT) and p66Shc knockout (KO) diabetic (DM) and nondiabetic (ND) mice. n = 3 mice for each group. *P < 0.05 in DM vs. ND; †P < 0.05 in KO vs. WT.
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Figure 4: Biomarkers of glyco-oxidation. Blood A1C and skin concentration of nitrotyrosines (a marker of tissue oxidative stress) and pentosidine (a marker of advanced glycation) were determined by high-performance chromatography in wild-type (WT) and p66Shc knockout (KO) diabetic (DM) and nondiabetic (ND) mice. n = 3 mice for each group. *P < 0.05 in DM vs. ND; †P < 0.05 in KO vs. WT.

Mentions: Fasting glucose levels were not significantly different between WT and p66Shc−/− diabetic mice (mean ± SEM 388 ± 28 vs. 401 ± 34 mg/dl; P = 0.77). Consistently, glycated hemoglobin was equally increased in WT and KO diabetic animals compared with nondiabetic animals (13.8 ± 1.4% vs. 6.6 ± 0.7% and 13.5 ± 1.2% vs. 6.5 ± 0.6%). The skin concentration of nitrotyrosines, a marker of tissue oxidative stress, was significantly increased by 2.5-fold in WT diabetic versus nondiabetic mice, while it was not significantly different in diabetic versus nondiabetic p66Shc−/− mice. Similarly, skin pentosidine concentration, an indicator of advanced glycation, was significantly increased by about 75% in WT diabetic versus nondiabetic mice, while it was not significantly different in diabetic versus nondiabetic p66Shc−/− mice (Fig. 4).


The redox enzyme p66Shc contributes to diabetes and ischemia-induced delay in cutaneous wound healing.

Fadini GP, Albiero M, Menegazzo L, Boscaro E, Pagnin E, Iori E, Cosma C, Lapolla A, Pengo V, Stendardo M, Agostini C, Pelicci PG, Giorgio M, Avogaro A - Diabetes (2010)

Biomarkers of glyco-oxidation. Blood A1C and skin concentration of nitrotyrosines (a marker of tissue oxidative stress) and pentosidine (a marker of advanced glycation) were determined by high-performance chromatography in wild-type (WT) and p66Shc knockout (KO) diabetic (DM) and nondiabetic (ND) mice. n = 3 mice for each group. *P < 0.05 in DM vs. ND; †P < 0.05 in KO vs. WT.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2927954&req=5

Figure 4: Biomarkers of glyco-oxidation. Blood A1C and skin concentration of nitrotyrosines (a marker of tissue oxidative stress) and pentosidine (a marker of advanced glycation) were determined by high-performance chromatography in wild-type (WT) and p66Shc knockout (KO) diabetic (DM) and nondiabetic (ND) mice. n = 3 mice for each group. *P < 0.05 in DM vs. ND; †P < 0.05 in KO vs. WT.
Mentions: Fasting glucose levels were not significantly different between WT and p66Shc−/− diabetic mice (mean ± SEM 388 ± 28 vs. 401 ± 34 mg/dl; P = 0.77). Consistently, glycated hemoglobin was equally increased in WT and KO diabetic animals compared with nondiabetic animals (13.8 ± 1.4% vs. 6.6 ± 0.7% and 13.5 ± 1.2% vs. 6.5 ± 0.6%). The skin concentration of nitrotyrosines, a marker of tissue oxidative stress, was significantly increased by 2.5-fold in WT diabetic versus nondiabetic mice, while it was not significantly different in diabetic versus nondiabetic p66Shc−/− mice. Similarly, skin pentosidine concentration, an indicator of advanced glycation, was significantly increased by about 75% in WT diabetic versus nondiabetic mice, while it was not significantly different in diabetic versus nondiabetic p66Shc−/− mice (Fig. 4).

Bottom Line: Genetic deletion of p66Shc prolongs life span and protects against oxidative stress.Migration of p66Shc(-/-) dermal fibroblasts in vitro was significantly faster than WT fibroblasts under both high glucose and hypoxia. p66Shc is involved in the delayed wound-healing process in the setting of diabetes and ischemia.Thus, p66Shc may represent a potential therapeutic target against this disabling diabetes complication.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Padova Medical School, Padova, Italy. gianpaolofadini@hotmail.com

ABSTRACT

Objective: The redox enzyme p66Shc produces hydrogen peroxide and triggers proapoptotic signals. Genetic deletion of p66Shc prolongs life span and protects against oxidative stress. In the present study, we evaluated the role of p66Shc in an animal model of diabetic wound healing.

Research design and methods: Skin wounds were created in wild-type (WT) and p66Shc(-/-) control and streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice with or without hind limb ischemia. Wounds were assessed for collagen content, thickness and vascularity of granulation tissue, apoptosis, reepithelialization, and expression of c-myc and beta-catenin. Response to hind limb ischemia was also evaluated.

Results: Diabetes delayed wound healing in WT mice with reduced granulation tissue thickness and vascularity, increased apoptosis, epithelial expression of c-myc, and nuclear localization of beta-catenin. These nonhealing features were worsened by hind limb ischemia. Diabetes induced p66Shc expression and activation; wound healing was significantly faster in p66Shc(-/-) than in WT diabetic mice, with or without hind limb ischemia, at 1 and 3 months of diabetes duration and in both SV129 and C57BL/6 genetic backgrounds. Deletion of p66Shc reversed nonhealing features, with increased collagen content and granulation tissue thickness, and reduced apoptosis and expression of c-myc and beta-catenin. p66Shc deletion improved response to hind limb ischemia in diabetic mice in terms of tissue damage, capillary density, and perfusion. Migration of p66Shc(-/-) dermal fibroblasts in vitro was significantly faster than WT fibroblasts under both high glucose and hypoxia.

Conclusions: p66Shc is involved in the delayed wound-healing process in the setting of diabetes and ischemia. Thus, p66Shc may represent a potential therapeutic target against this disabling diabetes complication.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus