Limits...
Keeping in touch with contact inhibition of locomotion.

Mayor R, Carmona-Fontaine C - Trends Cell Biol. (2010)

Bottom Line: Contact inhibition of locomotion (CIL) is the process by which cells in vitro change their direction of migration upon contact with another cell.Importantly, malignant cells exhibit a diminished CIL behaviour which allows them to invade healthy tissues.Finally, we propose possible cell surface proteins that could be involved in the initial contact that regulates Rho GTPases during CIL.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK. r.mayor@ucl.ac.uk

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Examples of collective cell migration. First column: schematic representation of different migratory types. The regions where cells are interacting are depicted as a red border. Second column: examples. (a) Intestinal epithelial cells. From Ref. [94], used with permission. (b) Zebrafish lateral line. Reprinted from: Haas et al. (2006) Chemokine signaling mediates self-organizing tissue migration in the zebrafish lateral line, Developmental Cell 10, 673–680, with permission from Elsevier. (c) Fibroblast-leaded squamous cell carcinoma invasion. Adapted by permission from Macmillan Publishers Ltd: Nature Cell Biology[32]. (d) Avian neural crest. Reprinted from: Rupp et al. (2007) A role for RhoA in the two-phase migratory pattern of post-otic neural crest cells, Developmental Biology 311, 159–171, with permission from Elsevier. Yellow arrowheads show localised protrusion formation. Third column: examples of these different types of migration in health (green background) and disease (red background). AVE: anterior visceral endoderm.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2927909&req=5

fig2: Examples of collective cell migration. First column: schematic representation of different migratory types. The regions where cells are interacting are depicted as a red border. Second column: examples. (a) Intestinal epithelial cells. From Ref. [94], used with permission. (b) Zebrafish lateral line. Reprinted from: Haas et al. (2006) Chemokine signaling mediates self-organizing tissue migration in the zebrafish lateral line, Developmental Cell 10, 673–680, with permission from Elsevier. (c) Fibroblast-leaded squamous cell carcinoma invasion. Adapted by permission from Macmillan Publishers Ltd: Nature Cell Biology[32]. (d) Avian neural crest. Reprinted from: Rupp et al. (2007) A role for RhoA in the two-phase migratory pattern of post-otic neural crest cells, Developmental Biology 311, 159–171, with permission from Elsevier. Yellow arrowheads show localised protrusion formation. Third column: examples of these different types of migration in health (green background) and disease (red background). AVE: anterior visceral endoderm.

Mentions: In multicellular organisms, cells often move in groups rather than as singular cells. Cell migration in loosely or closely associated groups has been called collective cell migration (reviewed in Refs [12,13,26]). Collective cell migration is now a widely recognized mode of migration during embryogenesis and cancer. Both collective cell migrations and CIL are defined by the ability of cells to interact with their neighbours during migration and it is probable that these two processes are linked. There is a wide variety of collective cell migration, from sheets of migrating cells found in carcinomas and in head mesoderm of amphibian embryos (Figure 2a, [6,27,28]), to closely associated clusters of cells such as the migration of the lateral line in zebrafish, border cells in Drosophila embryos or melanomas (Figure 2b, [29,30]). Other cells are organized in chains such as Drosophila myoblasts or squamous cell carcinoma (Figure 2c, [31,32]). Another example of this is the migration of endothelial cells during sprouting in angiogenesis, in which inhibition of cell protrusion between the cells and presence of large lamellipodia and filopodia in the leader cells has been compared to CIL [33]. Another mode of collective cell migration has been called streaming (Figure 2d), and has been found in the migration of neural crest cells, mammalian endoderm and possibly in some breast carcinomas [9,15,34,35]. In this type of migration, the cells move as a loose cluster in which individual cells can be identified but are constantly interacting with each other. Interestingly, it has been shown that during neural crest migration, an example of cell streaming, cells make local and transient contacts which are required for CIL [9,15].


Keeping in touch with contact inhibition of locomotion.

Mayor R, Carmona-Fontaine C - Trends Cell Biol. (2010)

Examples of collective cell migration. First column: schematic representation of different migratory types. The regions where cells are interacting are depicted as a red border. Second column: examples. (a) Intestinal epithelial cells. From Ref. [94], used with permission. (b) Zebrafish lateral line. Reprinted from: Haas et al. (2006) Chemokine signaling mediates self-organizing tissue migration in the zebrafish lateral line, Developmental Cell 10, 673–680, with permission from Elsevier. (c) Fibroblast-leaded squamous cell carcinoma invasion. Adapted by permission from Macmillan Publishers Ltd: Nature Cell Biology[32]. (d) Avian neural crest. Reprinted from: Rupp et al. (2007) A role for RhoA in the two-phase migratory pattern of post-otic neural crest cells, Developmental Biology 311, 159–171, with permission from Elsevier. Yellow arrowheads show localised protrusion formation. Third column: examples of these different types of migration in health (green background) and disease (red background). AVE: anterior visceral endoderm.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2927909&req=5

fig2: Examples of collective cell migration. First column: schematic representation of different migratory types. The regions where cells are interacting are depicted as a red border. Second column: examples. (a) Intestinal epithelial cells. From Ref. [94], used with permission. (b) Zebrafish lateral line. Reprinted from: Haas et al. (2006) Chemokine signaling mediates self-organizing tissue migration in the zebrafish lateral line, Developmental Cell 10, 673–680, with permission from Elsevier. (c) Fibroblast-leaded squamous cell carcinoma invasion. Adapted by permission from Macmillan Publishers Ltd: Nature Cell Biology[32]. (d) Avian neural crest. Reprinted from: Rupp et al. (2007) A role for RhoA in the two-phase migratory pattern of post-otic neural crest cells, Developmental Biology 311, 159–171, with permission from Elsevier. Yellow arrowheads show localised protrusion formation. Third column: examples of these different types of migration in health (green background) and disease (red background). AVE: anterior visceral endoderm.
Mentions: In multicellular organisms, cells often move in groups rather than as singular cells. Cell migration in loosely or closely associated groups has been called collective cell migration (reviewed in Refs [12,13,26]). Collective cell migration is now a widely recognized mode of migration during embryogenesis and cancer. Both collective cell migrations and CIL are defined by the ability of cells to interact with their neighbours during migration and it is probable that these two processes are linked. There is a wide variety of collective cell migration, from sheets of migrating cells found in carcinomas and in head mesoderm of amphibian embryos (Figure 2a, [6,27,28]), to closely associated clusters of cells such as the migration of the lateral line in zebrafish, border cells in Drosophila embryos or melanomas (Figure 2b, [29,30]). Other cells are organized in chains such as Drosophila myoblasts or squamous cell carcinoma (Figure 2c, [31,32]). Another example of this is the migration of endothelial cells during sprouting in angiogenesis, in which inhibition of cell protrusion between the cells and presence of large lamellipodia and filopodia in the leader cells has been compared to CIL [33]. Another mode of collective cell migration has been called streaming (Figure 2d), and has been found in the migration of neural crest cells, mammalian endoderm and possibly in some breast carcinomas [9,15,34,35]. In this type of migration, the cells move as a loose cluster in which individual cells can be identified but are constantly interacting with each other. Interestingly, it has been shown that during neural crest migration, an example of cell streaming, cells make local and transient contacts which are required for CIL [9,15].

Bottom Line: Contact inhibition of locomotion (CIL) is the process by which cells in vitro change their direction of migration upon contact with another cell.Importantly, malignant cells exhibit a diminished CIL behaviour which allows them to invade healthy tissues.Finally, we propose possible cell surface proteins that could be involved in the initial contact that regulates Rho GTPases during CIL.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK. r.mayor@ucl.ac.uk

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus