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Nutriomes and nutrient arrays - the key to personalised nutrition for DNA damage prevention and cancer growth control.

Fenech MF - Genome Integr (2010)

Bottom Line: DNA damage at the base-sequence, epigenome and chromosome level is a fundamental cause of developmental and degenerative diseases.The challenge is to identify for each individual the combination of micronutrients and their doses (i.e. the nutriome) that optimises genome stability and DNA repair.In this paper I describe and propose the use of high-throughput nutrient array systems with high content analysis diagnostics of DNA damage, cell death and cell growth for defining, on an individual basis, the optimal nutriome for DNA damage prevention and cancer growth control.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: CSIRO Food and Nutritional Sciences, PO Box 10041 Adelaide BC, SA, 5000, Australia. michael.fenech@csiro.au.

ABSTRACT
DNA damage at the base-sequence, epigenome and chromosome level is a fundamental cause of developmental and degenerative diseases. Multiple micronutrients and their interactions with the inherited and/or acquired genome determine DNA damage and genomic instability rates. The challenge is to identify for each individual the combination of micronutrients and their doses (i.e. the nutriome) that optimises genome stability and DNA repair. In this paper I describe and propose the use of high-throughput nutrient array systems with high content analysis diagnostics of DNA damage, cell death and cell growth for defining, on an individual basis, the optimal nutriome for DNA damage prevention and cancer growth control.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Nutrient arrays - The Rosetta Stone for unlocking personalised nutrition for genome maintenance. Theoretical example of a simple Nutrient Array microculture system. NUT = single nutrient or multiple nutrient combination; A-E = different types of nutrients or nutrient combinations; 1-3 = increasing dose levels. The different grey level colouring is simply an indication of the potential variability in cell growth, viability and genome stability that may be observed depending on the combinations used. The challenge is to identify the best combination or combinations for each individual.
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Figure 1: Nutrient arrays - The Rosetta Stone for unlocking personalised nutrition for genome maintenance. Theoretical example of a simple Nutrient Array microculture system. NUT = single nutrient or multiple nutrient combination; A-E = different types of nutrients or nutrient combinations; 1-3 = increasing dose levels. The different grey level colouring is simply an indication of the potential variability in cell growth, viability and genome stability that may be observed depending on the combinations used. The challenge is to identify the best combination or combinations for each individual.

Mentions: The biggest challenge in nutritional genomics is to make the quantum leap from a reductionist single nutrient-single gene interaction approach to studying the interaction of the complete nutrient combination (i.e. the nutriome) with the whole genome on an individual by individual basis. The ultimate goal is effectively to find for each individual the nutriome that best matches their genome so that cellular function and genome and epigenome maintenance is optimised. The "Rosetta Stone" (mechanism or code) to unravel this puzzle lies in developing nutrient arrays in microculture systems such that multiple nutriomes can be simultaneously tested whilst taking into consideration impact of dosage in the assessment (figure 1). The microwell that produces cells than can proliferate adequately and viably whilst maintaining optimal genome and epigenome stability is likely to represent the best nutriome match for that individual's cells. The development of high content automated analyses of DNA damage has already become feasible using quantitative image cytometry [37-40] such that multiple measures can be captured simultaneously in interphase cells including the number of cells and their nuclear DNA content, multiple measures of genome stability such as telomere length and aneuploidy by FISH, oxidised guanine and DNA methylation by immunohistochemistry, chromosome damage and telomere end fusions by micronucleus cytome assays in cytokinesis-blocked binuncleated cells and so on.


Nutriomes and nutrient arrays - the key to personalised nutrition for DNA damage prevention and cancer growth control.

Fenech MF - Genome Integr (2010)

Nutrient arrays - The Rosetta Stone for unlocking personalised nutrition for genome maintenance. Theoretical example of a simple Nutrient Array microculture system. NUT = single nutrient or multiple nutrient combination; A-E = different types of nutrients or nutrient combinations; 1-3 = increasing dose levels. The different grey level colouring is simply an indication of the potential variability in cell growth, viability and genome stability that may be observed depending on the combinations used. The challenge is to identify the best combination or combinations for each individual.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2927499&req=5

Figure 1: Nutrient arrays - The Rosetta Stone for unlocking personalised nutrition for genome maintenance. Theoretical example of a simple Nutrient Array microculture system. NUT = single nutrient or multiple nutrient combination; A-E = different types of nutrients or nutrient combinations; 1-3 = increasing dose levels. The different grey level colouring is simply an indication of the potential variability in cell growth, viability and genome stability that may be observed depending on the combinations used. The challenge is to identify the best combination or combinations for each individual.
Mentions: The biggest challenge in nutritional genomics is to make the quantum leap from a reductionist single nutrient-single gene interaction approach to studying the interaction of the complete nutrient combination (i.e. the nutriome) with the whole genome on an individual by individual basis. The ultimate goal is effectively to find for each individual the nutriome that best matches their genome so that cellular function and genome and epigenome maintenance is optimised. The "Rosetta Stone" (mechanism or code) to unravel this puzzle lies in developing nutrient arrays in microculture systems such that multiple nutriomes can be simultaneously tested whilst taking into consideration impact of dosage in the assessment (figure 1). The microwell that produces cells than can proliferate adequately and viably whilst maintaining optimal genome and epigenome stability is likely to represent the best nutriome match for that individual's cells. The development of high content automated analyses of DNA damage has already become feasible using quantitative image cytometry [37-40] such that multiple measures can be captured simultaneously in interphase cells including the number of cells and their nuclear DNA content, multiple measures of genome stability such as telomere length and aneuploidy by FISH, oxidised guanine and DNA methylation by immunohistochemistry, chromosome damage and telomere end fusions by micronucleus cytome assays in cytokinesis-blocked binuncleated cells and so on.

Bottom Line: DNA damage at the base-sequence, epigenome and chromosome level is a fundamental cause of developmental and degenerative diseases.The challenge is to identify for each individual the combination of micronutrients and their doses (i.e. the nutriome) that optimises genome stability and DNA repair.In this paper I describe and propose the use of high-throughput nutrient array systems with high content analysis diagnostics of DNA damage, cell death and cell growth for defining, on an individual basis, the optimal nutriome for DNA damage prevention and cancer growth control.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: CSIRO Food and Nutritional Sciences, PO Box 10041 Adelaide BC, SA, 5000, Australia. michael.fenech@csiro.au.

ABSTRACT
DNA damage at the base-sequence, epigenome and chromosome level is a fundamental cause of developmental and degenerative diseases. Multiple micronutrients and their interactions with the inherited and/or acquired genome determine DNA damage and genomic instability rates. The challenge is to identify for each individual the combination of micronutrients and their doses (i.e. the nutriome) that optimises genome stability and DNA repair. In this paper I describe and propose the use of high-throughput nutrient array systems with high content analysis diagnostics of DNA damage, cell death and cell growth for defining, on an individual basis, the optimal nutriome for DNA damage prevention and cancer growth control.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus