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Miss to the right: the effect of attentional asymmetries on goal-kicking.

Nicholls ME, Loetscher T, Rademacher M - PLoS ONE (2010)

Bottom Line: The data showed more rightward deviations for kicks at goal.Combined, the studies suggest that the rightward deviation for lines placed in far space extends to the kicking of a football in laboratory and real-life settings.This asymmetry in kicking builds on a body of research showing that attentional asymmetries impact everyday activities.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, Flinders University, Bedford Park, South Australia, Australia. mike.nicholls@flinders.edu.au

ABSTRACT
Cerebral asymmetries for spatial attention generate a bias of attention--causing lines to be bisected to the left or right in near (within reach) and far (outside reach) space, respectively. This study explored whether the rightward deviation for bisecting lines in far space extends to tasks where a ball is aimed between two goal-posts. Kicking was assessed in a laboratory and a real-life setting. In the laboratory setting, 212 participants carried out three conditions: (a) kick a soccer ball at a single goal post, (b) kick a soccer ball between two goal posts and (c) use a stick to indicate the middle between two goal posts. The goals were placed at a distance of 4.0 m. There was no deviation in the one-goal kicking condition--demonstrating that no asymmetries exist in the perceptual motor system when aiming at a single point. When kicking or pointing at the middle between two goal posts, rightward deviations were observed. In the real-world setting, the number of misses to the left or right of goal (behinds) in the Australian Rules football for the 2005-2009 seasons was assessed. The data showed more rightward deviations for kicks at goal. Combined, the studies suggest that the rightward deviation for lines placed in far space extends to the kicking of a football in laboratory and real-life settings. This asymmetry in kicking builds on a body of research showing that attentional asymmetries impact everyday activities.

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Illustration of the set-up for the: (a) One-goal kicking, (b) two-goal kicking and (c) pointing conditions.
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pone-0012363-g002: Illustration of the set-up for the: (a) One-goal kicking, (b) two-goal kicking and (c) pointing conditions.

Mentions: In the pointing condition, participants held a 4.0 m length of plastic tube with both hands. The far end of the pointer lay on top of the sensor array. The left/right starting position of the pointer was varied between trials. Participants were asked to slide the pointer along the top of the sensor array until it lay between the two goal posts. The positioning of the goal posts was the same as the two-goal kicking condition. When the participant indicated that they were satisfied with their bisection, the experimenter moved to the back of the array and read the accuracy of the bisection from the ruler. See figure 2 for an illustration of the three conditions.


Miss to the right: the effect of attentional asymmetries on goal-kicking.

Nicholls ME, Loetscher T, Rademacher M - PLoS ONE (2010)

Illustration of the set-up for the: (a) One-goal kicking, (b) two-goal kicking and (c) pointing conditions.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2927441&req=5

pone-0012363-g002: Illustration of the set-up for the: (a) One-goal kicking, (b) two-goal kicking and (c) pointing conditions.
Mentions: In the pointing condition, participants held a 4.0 m length of plastic tube with both hands. The far end of the pointer lay on top of the sensor array. The left/right starting position of the pointer was varied between trials. Participants were asked to slide the pointer along the top of the sensor array until it lay between the two goal posts. The positioning of the goal posts was the same as the two-goal kicking condition. When the participant indicated that they were satisfied with their bisection, the experimenter moved to the back of the array and read the accuracy of the bisection from the ruler. See figure 2 for an illustration of the three conditions.

Bottom Line: The data showed more rightward deviations for kicks at goal.Combined, the studies suggest that the rightward deviation for lines placed in far space extends to the kicking of a football in laboratory and real-life settings.This asymmetry in kicking builds on a body of research showing that attentional asymmetries impact everyday activities.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, Flinders University, Bedford Park, South Australia, Australia. mike.nicholls@flinders.edu.au

ABSTRACT
Cerebral asymmetries for spatial attention generate a bias of attention--causing lines to be bisected to the left or right in near (within reach) and far (outside reach) space, respectively. This study explored whether the rightward deviation for bisecting lines in far space extends to tasks where a ball is aimed between two goal-posts. Kicking was assessed in a laboratory and a real-life setting. In the laboratory setting, 212 participants carried out three conditions: (a) kick a soccer ball at a single goal post, (b) kick a soccer ball between two goal posts and (c) use a stick to indicate the middle between two goal posts. The goals were placed at a distance of 4.0 m. There was no deviation in the one-goal kicking condition--demonstrating that no asymmetries exist in the perceptual motor system when aiming at a single point. When kicking or pointing at the middle between two goal posts, rightward deviations were observed. In the real-world setting, the number of misses to the left or right of goal (behinds) in the Australian Rules football for the 2005-2009 seasons was assessed. The data showed more rightward deviations for kicks at goal. Combined, the studies suggest that the rightward deviation for lines placed in far space extends to the kicking of a football in laboratory and real-life settings. This asymmetry in kicking builds on a body of research showing that attentional asymmetries impact everyday activities.

Show MeSH