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Positive feedback between mycorrhizal fungi and plants influences plant invasion success and resistance to invasion.

Zhang Q, Yang R, Tang J, Yang H, Hu S, Chen X - PLoS ONE (2010)

Bottom Line: We found that S. canadensis altered AMF spore composition by increasing one AMF species (Glomus geosporum) while reducing Glomus mosseae, which is the dominant species in the field.Our results demonstrate that the invasive S. canadensis alters soil AMF community composition because of fungal-host preference.This change in the composition of the AMF community generates positive feedback to the invasive S. canadensis itself and decreases AM associations with native K. striata, thereby making the native K. striata less dominant.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Life Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China.

ABSTRACT
Negative or positive feedback between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and host plants can contribute to plant species interactions, but how this feedback affects plant invasion or resistance to invasion is not well known. Here we tested how alterations in AMF community induced by an invasive plant species generate feedback to the invasive plant itself and affect subsequent interactions between the invasive species and its native neighbors. We first examined the effects of the invasive forb Solidago canadensis L. on AMF communities comprising five different AMF species. We then examined the effects of the altered AMF community on mutualisms formed with the native legume forb species Kummerowia striata (Thunb.) Schindl. and on the interaction between the invasive and native plants. The host preferences of the five AMF were also assessed to test whether the AMF form preferred mutualistic relations with the invasive and/or the native species. We found that S. canadensis altered AMF spore composition by increasing one AMF species (Glomus geosporum) while reducing Glomus mosseae, which is the dominant species in the field. The host preference test showed that S. canadensis had promoted the abundance of AMF species (G. geosporum) that most promoted its own growth. As a consequence, the altered AMF community enhanced the competitiveness of invasive S. canadensis at the expense of K. striata. Our results demonstrate that the invasive S. canadensis alters soil AMF community composition because of fungal-host preference. This change in the composition of the AMF community generates positive feedback to the invasive S. canadensis itself and decreases AM associations with native K. striata, thereby making the native K. striata less dominant.

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Numbers of AMF spores (total and by AMF species) in soil grown with invasive S. canadensis or native K. striata in two growing years in experiment 1.Bars represent total spore numbers of the five AMF. Inset pie charts represent spore composition of the AMF species. Values are means ± standard error. Means with different letters are significantly different at the 5% level.
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pone-0012380-g001: Numbers of AMF spores (total and by AMF species) in soil grown with invasive S. canadensis or native K. striata in two growing years in experiment 1.Bars represent total spore numbers of the five AMF. Inset pie charts represent spore composition of the AMF species. Values are means ± standard error. Means with different letters are significantly different at the 5% level.

Mentions: The spore composition of the AMF community differed under the two hosts (Fig. 1): after the two growing seasons in experiment 1, Glomus geosporum spores were dominant under the invasive host (F1,14 = 37.64, P = 0.000) while Glomus mosseae spores were dominant under the native host (F1,14 = 89.71, P = 0.000) (Fig. 1A). There was no significant change in spore numbers of Glomus versiforme (F1,14 = 1.61, P = 0.225), but significantly different spore numbers of Glomus diaphanum (F1,14 = 5.28, P = 0.038) and Glomus etunicatum (F1, 14 = 9.29, P = 0.009) were found under the two host plants after the two growing season (Fig. 1A). The total numbers of AMF spores (F1,14 = 4.04, P = 0.064, Fig. 1A) were not different, but AMF communities diverged (in terms of Bray-Curtis similarity decreased, F1,6 = 77.15, P = 0.000, Fig. 1B) between the two host plants after the two growing seasons.


Positive feedback between mycorrhizal fungi and plants influences plant invasion success and resistance to invasion.

Zhang Q, Yang R, Tang J, Yang H, Hu S, Chen X - PLoS ONE (2010)

Numbers of AMF spores (total and by AMF species) in soil grown with invasive S. canadensis or native K. striata in two growing years in experiment 1.Bars represent total spore numbers of the five AMF. Inset pie charts represent spore composition of the AMF species. Values are means ± standard error. Means with different letters are significantly different at the 5% level.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2927435&req=5

pone-0012380-g001: Numbers of AMF spores (total and by AMF species) in soil grown with invasive S. canadensis or native K. striata in two growing years in experiment 1.Bars represent total spore numbers of the five AMF. Inset pie charts represent spore composition of the AMF species. Values are means ± standard error. Means with different letters are significantly different at the 5% level.
Mentions: The spore composition of the AMF community differed under the two hosts (Fig. 1): after the two growing seasons in experiment 1, Glomus geosporum spores were dominant under the invasive host (F1,14 = 37.64, P = 0.000) while Glomus mosseae spores were dominant under the native host (F1,14 = 89.71, P = 0.000) (Fig. 1A). There was no significant change in spore numbers of Glomus versiforme (F1,14 = 1.61, P = 0.225), but significantly different spore numbers of Glomus diaphanum (F1,14 = 5.28, P = 0.038) and Glomus etunicatum (F1, 14 = 9.29, P = 0.009) were found under the two host plants after the two growing season (Fig. 1A). The total numbers of AMF spores (F1,14 = 4.04, P = 0.064, Fig. 1A) were not different, but AMF communities diverged (in terms of Bray-Curtis similarity decreased, F1,6 = 77.15, P = 0.000, Fig. 1B) between the two host plants after the two growing seasons.

Bottom Line: We found that S. canadensis altered AMF spore composition by increasing one AMF species (Glomus geosporum) while reducing Glomus mosseae, which is the dominant species in the field.Our results demonstrate that the invasive S. canadensis alters soil AMF community composition because of fungal-host preference.This change in the composition of the AMF community generates positive feedback to the invasive S. canadensis itself and decreases AM associations with native K. striata, thereby making the native K. striata less dominant.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Life Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China.

ABSTRACT
Negative or positive feedback between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and host plants can contribute to plant species interactions, but how this feedback affects plant invasion or resistance to invasion is not well known. Here we tested how alterations in AMF community induced by an invasive plant species generate feedback to the invasive plant itself and affect subsequent interactions between the invasive species and its native neighbors. We first examined the effects of the invasive forb Solidago canadensis L. on AMF communities comprising five different AMF species. We then examined the effects of the altered AMF community on mutualisms formed with the native legume forb species Kummerowia striata (Thunb.) Schindl. and on the interaction between the invasive and native plants. The host preferences of the five AMF were also assessed to test whether the AMF form preferred mutualistic relations with the invasive and/or the native species. We found that S. canadensis altered AMF spore composition by increasing one AMF species (Glomus geosporum) while reducing Glomus mosseae, which is the dominant species in the field. The host preference test showed that S. canadensis had promoted the abundance of AMF species (G. geosporum) that most promoted its own growth. As a consequence, the altered AMF community enhanced the competitiveness of invasive S. canadensis at the expense of K. striata. Our results demonstrate that the invasive S. canadensis alters soil AMF community composition because of fungal-host preference. This change in the composition of the AMF community generates positive feedback to the invasive S. canadensis itself and decreases AM associations with native K. striata, thereby making the native K. striata less dominant.

Show MeSH