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Probing the natural scene by echolocation in bats.

Moss CF, Surlykke A - Front Behav Neurosci (2010)

Bottom Line: Bats echolocating in the natural environment face the formidable task of sorting signals from multiple auditory objects, echoes from obstacles, prey, and the calls of conspecifics.This article reviews field and laboratory studies that document adaptive sonar behaviors of echolocating bats, and point to the fundamental signal parameters they use to track and sort auditory objects in a dynamic environment.We suggest that adaptive sonar behavior provides a window to bats' perception of complex auditory scenes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology and Institute for Systems Research, Program in Neuroscience and Cognitive Science, University of Maryland College Park, MD, USA.

ABSTRACT
Bats echolocating in the natural environment face the formidable task of sorting signals from multiple auditory objects, echoes from obstacles, prey, and the calls of conspecifics. Successful orientation in a complex environment depends on auditory information processing, along with adaptive vocal-motor behaviors and flight path control, which draw upon 3-D spatial perception, attention, and memory. This article reviews field and laboratory studies that document adaptive sonar behaviors of echolocating bats, and point to the fundamental signal parameters they use to track and sort auditory objects in a dynamic environment. We suggest that adaptive sonar behavior provides a window to bats' perception of complex auditory scenes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic illustrating the active adjustments that bats make in call frequency (A), beam aim (B) and signal duration (C) that can aide in the segregation and streaming of acoustic information along the perceptual dimensions of pitch, direction, and distance.
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Figure 8: Schematic illustrating the active adjustments that bats make in call frequency (A), beam aim (B) and signal duration (C) that can aide in the segregation and streaming of acoustic information along the perceptual dimensions of pitch, direction, and distance.

Mentions: Research from field and laboratory studies demonstrate the bat's control over the frequency, timing, and direction of sonar calls, which leads us to propose that these parameters are used by the bat to segregate and track auditory objects in a dynamic environment. Figure 8 summarizes in schematic form the finding that bats echolocating in a complex environment adjust the frequency and/or direction of sonar vocalizations to stabilize these parameters in echo returns. By maintaining some constancy in sound frequency (Figure 8A) and direction (Figure 8B), the bat may be able to hear out auditory streams from selected objects in the midst of echoes from background targets and signals from other bats. As a bat flies towards a target, echo delay necessarily changes, and the bat must track coherent patterns of object distance changes over time. In the case of changing echo delay (Figure 8C), the bat may be able to hear out streams of echo delay that are shortening in a predictable temporal pattern, which depends on the angle between the bat's flight direction and the object.


Probing the natural scene by echolocation in bats.

Moss CF, Surlykke A - Front Behav Neurosci (2010)

Schematic illustrating the active adjustments that bats make in call frequency (A), beam aim (B) and signal duration (C) that can aide in the segregation and streaming of acoustic information along the perceptual dimensions of pitch, direction, and distance.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2927269&req=5

Figure 8: Schematic illustrating the active adjustments that bats make in call frequency (A), beam aim (B) and signal duration (C) that can aide in the segregation and streaming of acoustic information along the perceptual dimensions of pitch, direction, and distance.
Mentions: Research from field and laboratory studies demonstrate the bat's control over the frequency, timing, and direction of sonar calls, which leads us to propose that these parameters are used by the bat to segregate and track auditory objects in a dynamic environment. Figure 8 summarizes in schematic form the finding that bats echolocating in a complex environment adjust the frequency and/or direction of sonar vocalizations to stabilize these parameters in echo returns. By maintaining some constancy in sound frequency (Figure 8A) and direction (Figure 8B), the bat may be able to hear out auditory streams from selected objects in the midst of echoes from background targets and signals from other bats. As a bat flies towards a target, echo delay necessarily changes, and the bat must track coherent patterns of object distance changes over time. In the case of changing echo delay (Figure 8C), the bat may be able to hear out streams of echo delay that are shortening in a predictable temporal pattern, which depends on the angle between the bat's flight direction and the object.

Bottom Line: Bats echolocating in the natural environment face the formidable task of sorting signals from multiple auditory objects, echoes from obstacles, prey, and the calls of conspecifics.This article reviews field and laboratory studies that document adaptive sonar behaviors of echolocating bats, and point to the fundamental signal parameters they use to track and sort auditory objects in a dynamic environment.We suggest that adaptive sonar behavior provides a window to bats' perception of complex auditory scenes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology and Institute for Systems Research, Program in Neuroscience and Cognitive Science, University of Maryland College Park, MD, USA.

ABSTRACT
Bats echolocating in the natural environment face the formidable task of sorting signals from multiple auditory objects, echoes from obstacles, prey, and the calls of conspecifics. Successful orientation in a complex environment depends on auditory information processing, along with adaptive vocal-motor behaviors and flight path control, which draw upon 3-D spatial perception, attention, and memory. This article reviews field and laboratory studies that document adaptive sonar behaviors of echolocating bats, and point to the fundamental signal parameters they use to track and sort auditory objects in a dynamic environment. We suggest that adaptive sonar behavior provides a window to bats' perception of complex auditory scenes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus