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The Role of Lipids in Retrovirus Replication.

Waheed AA, Freed EO - Viruses (2010)

Bottom Line: Retroviruses undergo several critical steps to complete a replication cycle.These include the complex processes of virus entry, assembly, and budding that often take place at the plasma membrane of the host cell.In this review, we outline the current understanding of the role of lipids and membrane microdomains in retroviral replication.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Virus-Cell Interaction Section, HIV Drug Resistance Program, National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD 21702, USA.

ABSTRACT
Retroviruses undergo several critical steps to complete a replication cycle. These include the complex processes of virus entry, assembly, and budding that often take place at the plasma membrane of the host cell. Both virus entry and release involve membrane fusion/fission reactions between the viral envelopes and host cell membranes. Accumulating evidence indicates important roles for lipids and lipid microdomains in virus entry and egress. In this review, we outline the current understanding of the role of lipids and membrane microdomains in retroviral replication.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Copatching of HIV-1 Gag proteins with the raft marker GM1. Before fixation, Jurkat cells expressing HIV-1 Gag were treated with cholera toxin B subunit to stain GM1. Cells were then fixed, permeabilized, and Gag proteins were detected with an anti-p17 MA antibody. Gag and GM1 show colocalization, as shown in yellow in the merged image. Reprinted with permission from Ono and Freed [1]. Copyright 2005, Elsevier Inc.
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f5-viruses-02-01146: Copatching of HIV-1 Gag proteins with the raft marker GM1. Before fixation, Jurkat cells expressing HIV-1 Gag were treated with cholera toxin B subunit to stain GM1. Cells were then fixed, permeabilized, and Gag proteins were detected with an anti-p17 MA antibody. Gag and GM1 show colocalization, as shown in yellow in the merged image. Reprinted with permission from Ono and Freed [1]. Copyright 2005, Elsevier Inc.

Mentions: Retroviral assembly is a multistep process that takes place late in the replication cycle when the viral components come together to form a new generation of virus particles (reviewed in [104–106]). Replication-competent retroviruses typically encode two membrane-associated structural proteins, the Env glycoprotein and the Gag polyprotein precursor. Expression of the Gag precursor alone is sufficient to drive the formation of immature virus-like particles (VLPs), whereas for the production of infectious particles the Env glycoproteins and pol-coded enzymes PR, RT and IN are also required. Assembly takes place in a series of discrete steps and are generally promoted by three functional domains within the Gag precursor: the membrane binding (M), Gag-Gag interaction (I), and late (L) domains. As mentioned above, abundant evidence supports the idea that retroviral assembly and release take place in lipid rafts, consistent with the observation that HIV-1 Gag copatches with the raft component GM1 (Figure 5).


The Role of Lipids in Retrovirus Replication.

Waheed AA, Freed EO - Viruses (2010)

Copatching of HIV-1 Gag proteins with the raft marker GM1. Before fixation, Jurkat cells expressing HIV-1 Gag were treated with cholera toxin B subunit to stain GM1. Cells were then fixed, permeabilized, and Gag proteins were detected with an anti-p17 MA antibody. Gag and GM1 show colocalization, as shown in yellow in the merged image. Reprinted with permission from Ono and Freed [1]. Copyright 2005, Elsevier Inc.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2927015&req=5

f5-viruses-02-01146: Copatching of HIV-1 Gag proteins with the raft marker GM1. Before fixation, Jurkat cells expressing HIV-1 Gag were treated with cholera toxin B subunit to stain GM1. Cells were then fixed, permeabilized, and Gag proteins were detected with an anti-p17 MA antibody. Gag and GM1 show colocalization, as shown in yellow in the merged image. Reprinted with permission from Ono and Freed [1]. Copyright 2005, Elsevier Inc.
Mentions: Retroviral assembly is a multistep process that takes place late in the replication cycle when the viral components come together to form a new generation of virus particles (reviewed in [104–106]). Replication-competent retroviruses typically encode two membrane-associated structural proteins, the Env glycoprotein and the Gag polyprotein precursor. Expression of the Gag precursor alone is sufficient to drive the formation of immature virus-like particles (VLPs), whereas for the production of infectious particles the Env glycoproteins and pol-coded enzymes PR, RT and IN are also required. Assembly takes place in a series of discrete steps and are generally promoted by three functional domains within the Gag precursor: the membrane binding (M), Gag-Gag interaction (I), and late (L) domains. As mentioned above, abundant evidence supports the idea that retroviral assembly and release take place in lipid rafts, consistent with the observation that HIV-1 Gag copatches with the raft component GM1 (Figure 5).

Bottom Line: Retroviruses undergo several critical steps to complete a replication cycle.These include the complex processes of virus entry, assembly, and budding that often take place at the plasma membrane of the host cell.In this review, we outline the current understanding of the role of lipids and membrane microdomains in retroviral replication.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Virus-Cell Interaction Section, HIV Drug Resistance Program, National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD 21702, USA.

ABSTRACT
Retroviruses undergo several critical steps to complete a replication cycle. These include the complex processes of virus entry, assembly, and budding that often take place at the plasma membrane of the host cell. Both virus entry and release involve membrane fusion/fission reactions between the viral envelopes and host cell membranes. Accumulating evidence indicates important roles for lipids and lipid microdomains in virus entry and egress. In this review, we outline the current understanding of the role of lipids and membrane microdomains in retroviral replication.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus