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Improving motivation for academics in children with autism.

Koegel LK, Singh AK, Koegel RL - J Autism Dev Disord (2010)

Bottom Line: Using a multiple baseline across children and behaviors design with four pre- and elementary school children with autism, we assessed whether the above variables could be incorporated into academic tasks to improve performance and interest.Results indicated that the intervention decreased the children's latency to begin academic tasks, improved their rate of performance and interest, and decreased their disruptive behavior.Theoretical and applied implications are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Counseling/Clinical/School Psychology Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9490, USA. lynnk@education.ucsb.edu

ABSTRACT
Many children with autism show very little interest in academic assignments and exhibit disruptive behavior when assignments are presented. Research indicates that incorporating specific motivational variables such as choice, interspersal of maintenance tasks, and natural reinforcers during intervention leads to improvements in core symptoms of autism and may possibly be effective in academic areas. Using a multiple baseline across children and behaviors design with four pre- and elementary school children with autism, we assessed whether the above variables could be incorporated into academic tasks to improve performance and interest. Results indicated that the intervention decreased the children's latency to begin academic tasks, improved their rate of performance and interest, and decreased their disruptive behavior. Theoretical and applied implications are discussed.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

The percentage of 30 s intervals the participant engaged in disruptive behavior during writing (left panel) and math (right panel) on the ordinate
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Fig3: The percentage of 30 s intervals the participant engaged in disruptive behavior during writing (left panel) and math (right panel) on the ordinate

Mentions: Data for disruptive behavior are presented in the left panel of Fig. 3 for writing and the right panel of Fig. 3 for math. Each child was showing increasing amounts of disruptive behavior during all academic tasks in baseline. For all children, disruptive behavior decreased immediately following implementation of the intervention and remained low throughout the intervention and post-intervention phases.Fig. 3


Improving motivation for academics in children with autism.

Koegel LK, Singh AK, Koegel RL - J Autism Dev Disord (2010)

The percentage of 30 s intervals the participant engaged in disruptive behavior during writing (left panel) and math (right panel) on the ordinate
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2926912&req=5

Fig3: The percentage of 30 s intervals the participant engaged in disruptive behavior during writing (left panel) and math (right panel) on the ordinate
Mentions: Data for disruptive behavior are presented in the left panel of Fig. 3 for writing and the right panel of Fig. 3 for math. Each child was showing increasing amounts of disruptive behavior during all academic tasks in baseline. For all children, disruptive behavior decreased immediately following implementation of the intervention and remained low throughout the intervention and post-intervention phases.Fig. 3

Bottom Line: Using a multiple baseline across children and behaviors design with four pre- and elementary school children with autism, we assessed whether the above variables could be incorporated into academic tasks to improve performance and interest.Results indicated that the intervention decreased the children's latency to begin academic tasks, improved their rate of performance and interest, and decreased their disruptive behavior.Theoretical and applied implications are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Counseling/Clinical/School Psychology Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9490, USA. lynnk@education.ucsb.edu

ABSTRACT
Many children with autism show very little interest in academic assignments and exhibit disruptive behavior when assignments are presented. Research indicates that incorporating specific motivational variables such as choice, interspersal of maintenance tasks, and natural reinforcers during intervention leads to improvements in core symptoms of autism and may possibly be effective in academic areas. Using a multiple baseline across children and behaviors design with four pre- and elementary school children with autism, we assessed whether the above variables could be incorporated into academic tasks to improve performance and interest. Results indicated that the intervention decreased the children's latency to begin academic tasks, improved their rate of performance and interest, and decreased their disruptive behavior. Theoretical and applied implications are discussed.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus