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Plasma-Assisted Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes.

Lim SH, Luo Z, Shen Z, Lin J - Nanoscale Res Lett (2010)

Bottom Line: The application of plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) in the production and modification of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) will be reviewed.The challenges of PECVD methods to grow CNTs include low temperature synthesis, ion bombardment effects and directional growth of CNT within the plasma sheath.New strategies have been developed for low temperature synthesis of single-walled CNTs based the understanding of plasma chemistry and modelling.

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ABSTRACT
The application of plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) in the production and modification of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) will be reviewed. The challenges of PECVD methods to grow CNTs include low temperature synthesis, ion bombardment effects and directional growth of CNT within the plasma sheath. New strategies have been developed for low temperature synthesis of single-walled CNTs based the understanding of plasma chemistry and modelling. The modification of CNT surface properties and synthesis of CNT hybrid materials are possible with the utilization of plasma.

No MeSH data available.


A simplified diagram of a plasma-enhanced chemical vapour (PECVD) reactor
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Figure 2: A simplified diagram of a plasma-enhanced chemical vapour (PECVD) reactor

Mentions: Figure 2 showed a typical glow discharge encountered in a PECVD reactor. The plasma was generated by applying a direct current (DC) or radio frequency (<100–13.56 MHz) between two electrodes. The plasma is composed of electrons, charged ions and neutral molecules. The plasma remains electrically neutral as the ion density is balanced by the electron density. The electron density in the radio frequency generated plasma is typically ~108–109 cm−3 for a pressure range of 0.1–100 Torr. The electron temperatures are ~1–8 eV, while the ion temperatures are lower at ~50–100 meV. There is also a spontaneous but nonequilibrium conversion of neutral species into long-lived radicals. The plasma formed “sheaths”, dark regions of very low electron density, with the electrodes. Sheath voltages were formed across these dark regions with the electrodes and the plasma forming the two plates. The substrate in a plasma sheath was bombarded with flux of ions and neutral species, whose kinetic energy varies from a few tens to several hundreds of eV [35,36]. Electrons were confined within the plasma by the potential away from the sheath regions.


Plasma-Assisted Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes.

Lim SH, Luo Z, Shen Z, Lin J - Nanoscale Res Lett (2010)

A simplified diagram of a plasma-enhanced chemical vapour (PECVD) reactor
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2926880&req=5

Figure 2: A simplified diagram of a plasma-enhanced chemical vapour (PECVD) reactor
Mentions: Figure 2 showed a typical glow discharge encountered in a PECVD reactor. The plasma was generated by applying a direct current (DC) or radio frequency (<100–13.56 MHz) between two electrodes. The plasma is composed of electrons, charged ions and neutral molecules. The plasma remains electrically neutral as the ion density is balanced by the electron density. The electron density in the radio frequency generated plasma is typically ~108–109 cm−3 for a pressure range of 0.1–100 Torr. The electron temperatures are ~1–8 eV, while the ion temperatures are lower at ~50–100 meV. There is also a spontaneous but nonequilibrium conversion of neutral species into long-lived radicals. The plasma formed “sheaths”, dark regions of very low electron density, with the electrodes. Sheath voltages were formed across these dark regions with the electrodes and the plasma forming the two plates. The substrate in a plasma sheath was bombarded with flux of ions and neutral species, whose kinetic energy varies from a few tens to several hundreds of eV [35,36]. Electrons were confined within the plasma by the potential away from the sheath regions.

Bottom Line: The application of plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) in the production and modification of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) will be reviewed.The challenges of PECVD methods to grow CNTs include low temperature synthesis, ion bombardment effects and directional growth of CNT within the plasma sheath.New strategies have been developed for low temperature synthesis of single-walled CNTs based the understanding of plasma chemistry and modelling.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

ABSTRACT
The application of plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) in the production and modification of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) will be reviewed. The challenges of PECVD methods to grow CNTs include low temperature synthesis, ion bombardment effects and directional growth of CNT within the plasma sheath. New strategies have been developed for low temperature synthesis of single-walled CNTs based the understanding of plasma chemistry and modelling. The modification of CNT surface properties and synthesis of CNT hybrid materials are possible with the utilization of plasma.

No MeSH data available.