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Plasma-Assisted Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes.

Lim SH, Luo Z, Shen Z, Lin J - Nanoscale Res Lett (2010)

Bottom Line: The application of plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) in the production and modification of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) will be reviewed.The challenges of PECVD methods to grow CNTs include low temperature synthesis, ion bombardment effects and directional growth of CNT within the plasma sheath.New strategies have been developed for low temperature synthesis of single-walled CNTs based the understanding of plasma chemistry and modelling.

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ABSTRACT
The application of plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) in the production and modification of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) will be reviewed. The challenges of PECVD methods to grow CNTs include low temperature synthesis, ion bombardment effects and directional growth of CNT within the plasma sheath. New strategies have been developed for low temperature synthesis of single-walled CNTs based the understanding of plasma chemistry and modelling. The modification of CNT surface properties and synthesis of CNT hybrid materials are possible with the utilization of plasma.

No MeSH data available.


OOPIC PRO simulation showing (a) difference in surface potential between the substrate and the isolated electrode in a plasma, (b) equipotential lines due to charging encountered by the geometry, and (c) electric field vectors in the vicinity of the gap between the electrode pair in b. d Horizontally directed growth of MWNTs from the short/float electrode pair. [Adapted from ref [64]
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Figure 11: OOPIC PRO simulation showing (a) difference in surface potential between the substrate and the isolated electrode in a plasma, (b) equipotential lines due to charging encountered by the geometry, and (c) electric field vectors in the vicinity of the gap between the electrode pair in b. d Horizontally directed growth of MWNTs from the short/float electrode pair. [Adapted from ref [64]

Mentions: Law et al. [64] made use of this plasma-induced surface charging phenomenon to redirect electric field of the plasma sheath to be horizontally across two adjacent electrodes and achieve horizontal growth of CNTs. As shown in Fig. 11a “floating” electrode, which was separated from the substrate by an insulator, developed a floating potential Vfe with respect to the plasma potential. The potential of substrate (Vfsub) was the plasma potential at the wafer edges. Consequently, an electric field was developed across the insulator due to the potential difference of Vfe and Vfsub (see Fig. 11). Chai et al. [65] had also applied the same principle and achieved horizontal growth of CNTs in a modified plasma sheath.


Plasma-Assisted Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes.

Lim SH, Luo Z, Shen Z, Lin J - Nanoscale Res Lett (2010)

OOPIC PRO simulation showing (a) difference in surface potential between the substrate and the isolated electrode in a plasma, (b) equipotential lines due to charging encountered by the geometry, and (c) electric field vectors in the vicinity of the gap between the electrode pair in b. d Horizontally directed growth of MWNTs from the short/float electrode pair. [Adapted from ref [64]
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2926880&req=5

Figure 11: OOPIC PRO simulation showing (a) difference in surface potential between the substrate and the isolated electrode in a plasma, (b) equipotential lines due to charging encountered by the geometry, and (c) electric field vectors in the vicinity of the gap between the electrode pair in b. d Horizontally directed growth of MWNTs from the short/float electrode pair. [Adapted from ref [64]
Mentions: Law et al. [64] made use of this plasma-induced surface charging phenomenon to redirect electric field of the plasma sheath to be horizontally across two adjacent electrodes and achieve horizontal growth of CNTs. As shown in Fig. 11a “floating” electrode, which was separated from the substrate by an insulator, developed a floating potential Vfe with respect to the plasma potential. The potential of substrate (Vfsub) was the plasma potential at the wafer edges. Consequently, an electric field was developed across the insulator due to the potential difference of Vfe and Vfsub (see Fig. 11). Chai et al. [65] had also applied the same principle and achieved horizontal growth of CNTs in a modified plasma sheath.

Bottom Line: The application of plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) in the production and modification of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) will be reviewed.The challenges of PECVD methods to grow CNTs include low temperature synthesis, ion bombardment effects and directional growth of CNT within the plasma sheath.New strategies have been developed for low temperature synthesis of single-walled CNTs based the understanding of plasma chemistry and modelling.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

ABSTRACT
The application of plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) in the production and modification of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) will be reviewed. The challenges of PECVD methods to grow CNTs include low temperature synthesis, ion bombardment effects and directional growth of CNT within the plasma sheath. New strategies have been developed for low temperature synthesis of single-walled CNTs based the understanding of plasma chemistry and modelling. The modification of CNT surface properties and synthesis of CNT hybrid materials are possible with the utilization of plasma.

No MeSH data available.