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Plasma-Assisted Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes.

Lim SH, Luo Z, Shen Z, Lin J - Nanoscale Res Lett (2010)

Bottom Line: The application of plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) in the production and modification of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) will be reviewed.The challenges of PECVD methods to grow CNTs include low temperature synthesis, ion bombardment effects and directional growth of CNT within the plasma sheath.New strategies have been developed for low temperature synthesis of single-walled CNTs based the understanding of plasma chemistry and modelling.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

ABSTRACT
The application of plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) in the production and modification of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) will be reviewed. The challenges of PECVD methods to grow CNTs include low temperature synthesis, ion bombardment effects and directional growth of CNT within the plasma sheath. New strategies have been developed for low temperature synthesis of single-walled CNTs based the understanding of plasma chemistry and modelling. The modification of CNT surface properties and synthesis of CNT hybrid materials are possible with the utilization of plasma.

No MeSH data available.


a Structure of a carbon nanotube (α = 0) and carbon nanofibre (α > 0) produced by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition. α is the angle between the central axis and the graphite basal planes. [Adapted from Ref [19]b Raman spectroscopy of MWNTs and CNFs. [Adapted from Ref [29]
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Figure 1: a Structure of a carbon nanotube (α = 0) and carbon nanofibre (α > 0) produced by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition. α is the angle between the central axis and the graphite basal planes. [Adapted from Ref [19]b Raman spectroscopy of MWNTs and CNFs. [Adapted from Ref [29]

Mentions: Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are unique one-dimensional carbon materials which exist mainly as single-walled (SWNTs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). CNTs exhibit extraordinary properties such as high tensile strength, excellent electrical and thermal conductivities [1,2]. A wide range of potential applications of CNTs have been envisioned in the field of computer logic and memory devices, interconnect via, nanosensors, field emitters, nanoactuators, polymer composites, catalyst supports and membranes [3-10]. Of particular interest is the electronic property of SWNTs, which are seamlessly rolled-up graphene sheets of carbon, behaving either as semiconductors or as metals depending on its diameters and chiralities [11]. Metallic SWNTs possess ballistic electron transport [12] and huge current carrying capacity while semiconducting SWNTs are interesting candidates for field-effect transistors [13]. The electronic properties of MWNTs depend on the features of each coaxial carbon shell, and electron conduction takes place within the basal planes (a-axis) of graphite [14]. As shown in Fig. 1a, the concentric graphite basal planes of MWNTs are parallel to the central axis (α = 0). In the case α > 0, the multi-walled carbon nanostructures are commonly called carbon nanofibres (CNFs) with their graphene layers arranged as stacked cones or plates, which exhibit a mixture of a-axis (basal plane) and c-axis (normal to basal plane) electron conduction [15-29]. Raman spectroscopy also distinguishes the structural differences between CNFs and MWNTs (see Fig. 1b). CNFs exhibit an additional shoulder at 1,612 cm−1 for the tangential graphitic G-band (typically located at ~1,589 cm−1), which is absent for ideal MWNTs [29]. The unique electronic conductions of one-dimensional carbon-based materials are useful for future microelectronics devices.


Plasma-Assisted Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes.

Lim SH, Luo Z, Shen Z, Lin J - Nanoscale Res Lett (2010)

a Structure of a carbon nanotube (α = 0) and carbon nanofibre (α > 0) produced by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition. α is the angle between the central axis and the graphite basal planes. [Adapted from Ref [19]b Raman spectroscopy of MWNTs and CNFs. [Adapted from Ref [29]
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2926880&req=5

Figure 1: a Structure of a carbon nanotube (α = 0) and carbon nanofibre (α > 0) produced by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition. α is the angle between the central axis and the graphite basal planes. [Adapted from Ref [19]b Raman spectroscopy of MWNTs and CNFs. [Adapted from Ref [29]
Mentions: Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are unique one-dimensional carbon materials which exist mainly as single-walled (SWNTs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). CNTs exhibit extraordinary properties such as high tensile strength, excellent electrical and thermal conductivities [1,2]. A wide range of potential applications of CNTs have been envisioned in the field of computer logic and memory devices, interconnect via, nanosensors, field emitters, nanoactuators, polymer composites, catalyst supports and membranes [3-10]. Of particular interest is the electronic property of SWNTs, which are seamlessly rolled-up graphene sheets of carbon, behaving either as semiconductors or as metals depending on its diameters and chiralities [11]. Metallic SWNTs possess ballistic electron transport [12] and huge current carrying capacity while semiconducting SWNTs are interesting candidates for field-effect transistors [13]. The electronic properties of MWNTs depend on the features of each coaxial carbon shell, and electron conduction takes place within the basal planes (a-axis) of graphite [14]. As shown in Fig. 1a, the concentric graphite basal planes of MWNTs are parallel to the central axis (α = 0). In the case α > 0, the multi-walled carbon nanostructures are commonly called carbon nanofibres (CNFs) with their graphene layers arranged as stacked cones or plates, which exhibit a mixture of a-axis (basal plane) and c-axis (normal to basal plane) electron conduction [15-29]. Raman spectroscopy also distinguishes the structural differences between CNFs and MWNTs (see Fig. 1b). CNFs exhibit an additional shoulder at 1,612 cm−1 for the tangential graphitic G-band (typically located at ~1,589 cm−1), which is absent for ideal MWNTs [29]. The unique electronic conductions of one-dimensional carbon-based materials are useful for future microelectronics devices.

Bottom Line: The application of plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) in the production and modification of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) will be reviewed.The challenges of PECVD methods to grow CNTs include low temperature synthesis, ion bombardment effects and directional growth of CNT within the plasma sheath.New strategies have been developed for low temperature synthesis of single-walled CNTs based the understanding of plasma chemistry and modelling.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

ABSTRACT
The application of plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) in the production and modification of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) will be reviewed. The challenges of PECVD methods to grow CNTs include low temperature synthesis, ion bombardment effects and directional growth of CNT within the plasma sheath. New strategies have been developed for low temperature synthesis of single-walled CNTs based the understanding of plasma chemistry and modelling. The modification of CNT surface properties and synthesis of CNT hybrid materials are possible with the utilization of plasma.

No MeSH data available.