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Nanofibers offer alternative ways to the treatment of skin infections.

Heunis TD, Dicks LM - J. Biomed. Biotechnol. (2010)

Bottom Line: Many pathogens are resistant to antibiotics, rendering conventional treatment less effective.Electrospinning as a technique to prepare nanofibers is discussed.The possibility of using these structures as drug delivery systems is investigated.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Microbiology, University of Stellenbosch, Matieland, Stellenbosch 7602, South Africa.

ABSTRACT
Injury to the skin causes a breach in the protective layer surrounding the body. Many pathogens are resistant to antibiotics, rendering conventional treatment less effective. This led to the use of alternative antimicrobial compounds, such as silver ions, in skin treatment. In this review nanofibers, and the incorporation of natural antimicrobial compounds in these scaffolds, are discussed as an alternative way to control skin infections. Electrospinning as a technique to prepare nanofibers is discussed. The possibility of using these structures as drug delivery systems is investigated.

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Schematic representation of the electospinning process.
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fig2: Schematic representation of the electospinning process.

Mentions: Several methods are used to produce ultra fine fibers, for example, self assembly of polymers, template synthesis, phase separation, and electrospinning [49, 62–66]. Electrospinning, schematically presented in Figure 2, is the most cost effective and easiest way to produce large volumes of nanofibers. One electrode is placed in a polymer solution and the other electrode is linked to a collector, which is usually a stationary or rotating metal screen, plate, or wheel. The electrically charged polymer forms a Taylor cone at the tip of the needle and is ejected at a specific charge. As the polymer solution accelerates, the solvent evaporates and nanofibers are formed. Fibers are aligned by using a rotating collector, an auxiliary electrical field, or a rotating collector with a sharp edge and a rapidly oscillating frame [67–71]. Coaxial electrospinning (Figure 3(a)) is used to produce nanofibers with a core-shell structure (Figure 4(a)), which is ideal for encapsulating hydrophilic molecules. Coaxial spun fibers have a high loading efficiency [56, 72]. Emulsion electrospinning is also used to produce core-shell-structured nanofibers (Figures 3(b) and 4(b)). An emulsion is prepared by emulsifying an aqueous phase, which contains a hydrophilic polymer or molecule to be encapsulated, into an organic phase containing a polymer that forms the shell [42, 61]. The emulsion is then electrospun into core-shell-structured nanofibers (Figure 4(b)).


Nanofibers offer alternative ways to the treatment of skin infections.

Heunis TD, Dicks LM - J. Biomed. Biotechnol. (2010)

Schematic representation of the electospinning process.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2926677&req=5

fig2: Schematic representation of the electospinning process.
Mentions: Several methods are used to produce ultra fine fibers, for example, self assembly of polymers, template synthesis, phase separation, and electrospinning [49, 62–66]. Electrospinning, schematically presented in Figure 2, is the most cost effective and easiest way to produce large volumes of nanofibers. One electrode is placed in a polymer solution and the other electrode is linked to a collector, which is usually a stationary or rotating metal screen, plate, or wheel. The electrically charged polymer forms a Taylor cone at the tip of the needle and is ejected at a specific charge. As the polymer solution accelerates, the solvent evaporates and nanofibers are formed. Fibers are aligned by using a rotating collector, an auxiliary electrical field, or a rotating collector with a sharp edge and a rapidly oscillating frame [67–71]. Coaxial electrospinning (Figure 3(a)) is used to produce nanofibers with a core-shell structure (Figure 4(a)), which is ideal for encapsulating hydrophilic molecules. Coaxial spun fibers have a high loading efficiency [56, 72]. Emulsion electrospinning is also used to produce core-shell-structured nanofibers (Figures 3(b) and 4(b)). An emulsion is prepared by emulsifying an aqueous phase, which contains a hydrophilic polymer or molecule to be encapsulated, into an organic phase containing a polymer that forms the shell [42, 61]. The emulsion is then electrospun into core-shell-structured nanofibers (Figure 4(b)).

Bottom Line: Many pathogens are resistant to antibiotics, rendering conventional treatment less effective.Electrospinning as a technique to prepare nanofibers is discussed.The possibility of using these structures as drug delivery systems is investigated.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Microbiology, University of Stellenbosch, Matieland, Stellenbosch 7602, South Africa.

ABSTRACT
Injury to the skin causes a breach in the protective layer surrounding the body. Many pathogens are resistant to antibiotics, rendering conventional treatment less effective. This led to the use of alternative antimicrobial compounds, such as silver ions, in skin treatment. In this review nanofibers, and the incorporation of natural antimicrobial compounds in these scaffolds, are discussed as an alternative way to control skin infections. Electrospinning as a technique to prepare nanofibers is discussed. The possibility of using these structures as drug delivery systems is investigated.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus