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Death in 12-24-Year-Old Youth in Nova Scotia: High Risk of Preventable Deaths for Males, Socially Deprived and Rural Populations-A Report from the NSYOUTHS Program.

Dummer TJ, Bellemare S, Macdonald N, Parker L - Int J Pediatr (2010)

Bottom Line: Youth most at risk of death were males, the more socially deprived, and those living in rural areas.Initiatives and prevention policies should be targeted towards specific at-risk groups, particularly males living in rural areas.Published vital statistics hide these important trends and thus provide only limited evidence with which to base-prevention initiatives.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Population Cancer Research Program, Dalhousie University, 1494 Carlton Street, Halifax, NS, Canada B3H 3B7.

ABSTRACT
Deaths from avoidable causes represent the largest component of deaths in young people in Canada and have a considerable social cost in relation to years of potential life lost. We evaluated social and demographic determinants of deaths in youth aged 12-24 years in Nova Scotia for the period 1995-2004. Youth most at risk of death were males, the more socially deprived, and those living in rural areas. There was a five-fold increase in suicides and a three-fold increase in injury deaths in males compared to females and a substantial component of these deaths were amongst males living in rural areas. Initiatives and prevention policies should be targeted towards specific at-risk groups, particularly males living in rural areas. Published vital statistics hide these important trends and thus provide only limited evidence with which to base-prevention initiatives.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Death rates by age per 100,000 youth, overall and by male and female.
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fig2: Death rates by age per 100,000 youth, overall and by male and female.

Mentions: Death rates, overall and stratified by gender, are presented in Table 2. During the study period, there was no significant change in death rates over time. There was a two-fold increase in male compared to female death rates; male rate 58 (95% CI: 53–63) per 100,000 youth, female rate 27 (95% CI: 24–31) per 100,000 youth, adjusted IRR 2.1 (95% CI 1.8–2.5). Death rates were markedly higher in rural compared to urban areas; rural death rate 51 (95% CI: 46–56) per 100,000, urban death rate 38 (95% CI: 34–41) per 100,000, adjusted IRR 1.3 (95% CI: 1.1–1.5) in rural compared to urban areas. There was a trend for higher death rates in the lower socioeconomic groups, adjusted IRR was 1.6 (95% CI: 1.3–2.0) comparing 1st (lowest) to 4th (highest) SES quartile. Death rates by age increased steadily from the lowest rate at age 12 years, peaking at age 20 years before declining at age 21, although the rate at age 24 was very similar to the rate at ages 22 and 23 years (see Table 2 and Figure 2). The male death rate was consistently higher than the female rate and although the overall trend by age was similar the gap between male and female rates widened with older age.


Death in 12-24-Year-Old Youth in Nova Scotia: High Risk of Preventable Deaths for Males, Socially Deprived and Rural Populations-A Report from the NSYOUTHS Program.

Dummer TJ, Bellemare S, Macdonald N, Parker L - Int J Pediatr (2010)

Death rates by age per 100,000 youth, overall and by male and female.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2926586&req=5

fig2: Death rates by age per 100,000 youth, overall and by male and female.
Mentions: Death rates, overall and stratified by gender, are presented in Table 2. During the study period, there was no significant change in death rates over time. There was a two-fold increase in male compared to female death rates; male rate 58 (95% CI: 53–63) per 100,000 youth, female rate 27 (95% CI: 24–31) per 100,000 youth, adjusted IRR 2.1 (95% CI 1.8–2.5). Death rates were markedly higher in rural compared to urban areas; rural death rate 51 (95% CI: 46–56) per 100,000, urban death rate 38 (95% CI: 34–41) per 100,000, adjusted IRR 1.3 (95% CI: 1.1–1.5) in rural compared to urban areas. There was a trend for higher death rates in the lower socioeconomic groups, adjusted IRR was 1.6 (95% CI: 1.3–2.0) comparing 1st (lowest) to 4th (highest) SES quartile. Death rates by age increased steadily from the lowest rate at age 12 years, peaking at age 20 years before declining at age 21, although the rate at age 24 was very similar to the rate at ages 22 and 23 years (see Table 2 and Figure 2). The male death rate was consistently higher than the female rate and although the overall trend by age was similar the gap between male and female rates widened with older age.

Bottom Line: Youth most at risk of death were males, the more socially deprived, and those living in rural areas.Initiatives and prevention policies should be targeted towards specific at-risk groups, particularly males living in rural areas.Published vital statistics hide these important trends and thus provide only limited evidence with which to base-prevention initiatives.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Population Cancer Research Program, Dalhousie University, 1494 Carlton Street, Halifax, NS, Canada B3H 3B7.

ABSTRACT
Deaths from avoidable causes represent the largest component of deaths in young people in Canada and have a considerable social cost in relation to years of potential life lost. We evaluated social and demographic determinants of deaths in youth aged 12-24 years in Nova Scotia for the period 1995-2004. Youth most at risk of death were males, the more socially deprived, and those living in rural areas. There was a five-fold increase in suicides and a three-fold increase in injury deaths in males compared to females and a substantial component of these deaths were amongst males living in rural areas. Initiatives and prevention policies should be targeted towards specific at-risk groups, particularly males living in rural areas. Published vital statistics hide these important trends and thus provide only limited evidence with which to base-prevention initiatives.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus