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Dermoscopy of rippled pattern sebaceoma.

Nomura M, Tanaka M, Nunomura M, Izumi M, Oryu F - Dermatol Res Pract (2010)

Bottom Line: No association with Muir-Torre syndrome was found.We presented a case of rippled-pattern sebaceoma and described its dermoscopic features.This was the first report referring to the dermoscopic features of sebaceoma.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Dermatology, Tokyo Woman's Medical University Medical Center East, 2-1-10 Nishi-Ogu, Arakawa-ku, Tokyo 116-8567, Japan.

ABSTRACT
A 77-year-old Japanese woman presented a dome-shaped pinkish nodule on the scalp. Dermoscopy demonstrated yellowish homogeneous ovoid areas with translucent whitish veil and arborizing vessels. No association with Muir-Torre syndrome was found. Histopathology revealed a smooth-bordered neoplasm in the dermis with partial connection to the epidermis. The tumor was composed mainly of germinative cells. The tumor focally showed a typical "rippled pattern". There were only a few vacuolated cells suggesting sebaceous differentiation. These cells were highlighted with adipophilin antibody. No nuclear atypia or mitotic figures were observed. We regarded the neoplasm as sebaceoma. Dermoscopy demonstrated clearly visualized yellowish homogeneous ovoid areas. This feature usually corresponds to dermal conglomerations of the cells with sebaceous differentiation. However, this case histopathologically showed only limited area with sebaceous differentiation. We presented a case of rippled-pattern sebaceoma and described its dermoscopic features. This was the first report referring to the dermoscopic features of sebaceoma.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Sebocytes seen at the periphery of the tumor nests are positive with adipophilin.
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fig7: Sebocytes seen at the periphery of the tumor nests are positive with adipophilin.

Mentions: A 77-year-old Japanese woman presented with a tumor on the parietal region of the scalp, which had gradually enlarged over the previous several years. Physical examination revealed a dome-shaped faintly pinkish nodule, 10 × 8 mm in size. The surface of the tumor was covered with yellow papules (Figure 1). Dermoscopic examination demonstrated yellowish homogeneous ovoid areas covered with translucent whitish veil and arborizing vessels at the peripheral peach-colored area of the nodule (Figure 2). The patient had no significant family or past history. No association with Muir-Torre syndrome was found. The lesion was suspected as being a sebaceous neoplasm and totally excised. Histopathological examination of the excised nodule revealed a well-circumscribed and smooth-bordered neoplasm in the entire dermis with partial connection to the epidermis (Figure 3). The tumor was multinodular, and the most part of the nodule was composed of germinative cells. In addition, the tumor focally showed a typical “rippled pattern” (Figure 4). The cells were arranged in linear rows parallel to one another, simulating Verocay bodies, which were positive for AE1/AE3 (Figure 5) but negative for S-100 protein. There were only a few vacuolated cells with foamy and bubbly cytoplasm, suggesting sebaceous differentiation especially at the superficial area of the region (Figure 6). These cells possess lipid vacuoles which were highlighted with adipophilin antibody (Figure 7). No nuclear atypia or mitotic figures were observed in the constituents of neoplastic cells. There were no features suggesting the existence of nevus sebaceus, such as sebaceous hyperplasia or ectopic apocrine glands around the tumor.


Dermoscopy of rippled pattern sebaceoma.

Nomura M, Tanaka M, Nunomura M, Izumi M, Oryu F - Dermatol Res Pract (2010)

Sebocytes seen at the periphery of the tumor nests are positive with adipophilin.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2926582&req=5

fig7: Sebocytes seen at the periphery of the tumor nests are positive with adipophilin.
Mentions: A 77-year-old Japanese woman presented with a tumor on the parietal region of the scalp, which had gradually enlarged over the previous several years. Physical examination revealed a dome-shaped faintly pinkish nodule, 10 × 8 mm in size. The surface of the tumor was covered with yellow papules (Figure 1). Dermoscopic examination demonstrated yellowish homogeneous ovoid areas covered with translucent whitish veil and arborizing vessels at the peripheral peach-colored area of the nodule (Figure 2). The patient had no significant family or past history. No association with Muir-Torre syndrome was found. The lesion was suspected as being a sebaceous neoplasm and totally excised. Histopathological examination of the excised nodule revealed a well-circumscribed and smooth-bordered neoplasm in the entire dermis with partial connection to the epidermis (Figure 3). The tumor was multinodular, and the most part of the nodule was composed of germinative cells. In addition, the tumor focally showed a typical “rippled pattern” (Figure 4). The cells were arranged in linear rows parallel to one another, simulating Verocay bodies, which were positive for AE1/AE3 (Figure 5) but negative for S-100 protein. There were only a few vacuolated cells with foamy and bubbly cytoplasm, suggesting sebaceous differentiation especially at the superficial area of the region (Figure 6). These cells possess lipid vacuoles which were highlighted with adipophilin antibody (Figure 7). No nuclear atypia or mitotic figures were observed in the constituents of neoplastic cells. There were no features suggesting the existence of nevus sebaceus, such as sebaceous hyperplasia or ectopic apocrine glands around the tumor.

Bottom Line: No association with Muir-Torre syndrome was found.We presented a case of rippled-pattern sebaceoma and described its dermoscopic features.This was the first report referring to the dermoscopic features of sebaceoma.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Dermatology, Tokyo Woman's Medical University Medical Center East, 2-1-10 Nishi-Ogu, Arakawa-ku, Tokyo 116-8567, Japan.

ABSTRACT
A 77-year-old Japanese woman presented a dome-shaped pinkish nodule on the scalp. Dermoscopy demonstrated yellowish homogeneous ovoid areas with translucent whitish veil and arborizing vessels. No association with Muir-Torre syndrome was found. Histopathology revealed a smooth-bordered neoplasm in the dermis with partial connection to the epidermis. The tumor was composed mainly of germinative cells. The tumor focally showed a typical "rippled pattern". There were only a few vacuolated cells suggesting sebaceous differentiation. These cells were highlighted with adipophilin antibody. No nuclear atypia or mitotic figures were observed. We regarded the neoplasm as sebaceoma. Dermoscopy demonstrated clearly visualized yellowish homogeneous ovoid areas. This feature usually corresponds to dermal conglomerations of the cells with sebaceous differentiation. However, this case histopathologically showed only limited area with sebaceous differentiation. We presented a case of rippled-pattern sebaceoma and described its dermoscopic features. This was the first report referring to the dermoscopic features of sebaceoma.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus