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The attrition rate of licensed chiropractors in California: an exploratory ecological investigation of time-trend data.

Foreman SM, Stahl MJ - Chiropr Osteopat (2010)

Bottom Line: The 10-year attrition rate rose from 10% for those graduates licensed in 1970 to a peak of 27.8% in 1991.The 10-year attrition rate has since remained between 20-25% for the doctors licensed between 1992-1998.Available evidence supports the hypothesis that the attrition rate for licensed chiropractors in the first 10 years of practice has risen in the past several decades.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Private practice of chiropractic, West Hills, California, USA. smfdoc@sbcglobal.net.

ABSTRACT

Background: The authors hypothesized the attrition rate of licensed chiropractors in California has gradually increased over the past several decades. "Attrition" as determined for this study is defined as a loss of legal authority to practice chiropractic for any reason during the first 10 years after the license was issued. The percentage of license attrition after 10 years was determined for each group of graduates licensed in California each year between 1970 and 1998. The cost of tuition, the increase in the supply of licensed chiropractors and the ratio of licensed chiropractors to California residents were examined as possible influences on the rate of license attrition.

Methods: The attrition rate was determined by a retrospective analysis of license status data obtained from the California Department of Consumer Affairs. Other variables were determined from US Bureau of Census data, survey data from the American Chiropractic Association and catalogs from a US chiropractic college.

Results: The 10-year attrition rate rose from 10% for those graduates licensed in 1970 to a peak of 27.8% in 1991. The 10-year attrition rate has since remained between 20-25% for the doctors licensed between 1992-1998.

Conclusions: Available evidence supports the hypothesis that the attrition rate for licensed chiropractors in the first 10 years of practice has risen in the past several decades.

No MeSH data available.


Changes in tuition 1970 to 1999. A time-trend depiction of the increasing quarterly tuition of a chiropractic college from 1970 to 1999. The dotted line represents the $255 per quarter tuition in 1970 adjusted for inflation between 1970 and 1999. The actual rise in tuition exceeds inflation by 414%.
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Figure 7: Changes in tuition 1970 to 1999. A time-trend depiction of the increasing quarterly tuition of a chiropractic college from 1970 to 1999. The dotted line represents the $255 per quarter tuition in 1970 adjusted for inflation between 1970 and 1999. The actual rise in tuition exceeds inflation by 414%.

Mentions: Quarterly tuition in 1970, as seen in Figure 7, was $255 and rose to $4,530 in 1998, a total increase of 1,676% in 28 years. Information from the catalogs revealed the tuition increased 194% in the 1970s, 114% in the 1980s and 101% in the 1990s. The increase of tuition from the $255 per quarter level in 1970 far exceeded the rate of inflation between 1970 and 1998. The $255 quarterly tuition adjusted for inflation to 1998 dollars would have risen to $1092. Thus, the $4,530 per quarter tuition in 1998 outpaced inflation by 414%.


The attrition rate of licensed chiropractors in California: an exploratory ecological investigation of time-trend data.

Foreman SM, Stahl MJ - Chiropr Osteopat (2010)

Changes in tuition 1970 to 1999. A time-trend depiction of the increasing quarterly tuition of a chiropractic college from 1970 to 1999. The dotted line represents the $255 per quarter tuition in 1970 adjusted for inflation between 1970 and 1999. The actual rise in tuition exceeds inflation by 414%.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2925831&req=5

Figure 7: Changes in tuition 1970 to 1999. A time-trend depiction of the increasing quarterly tuition of a chiropractic college from 1970 to 1999. The dotted line represents the $255 per quarter tuition in 1970 adjusted for inflation between 1970 and 1999. The actual rise in tuition exceeds inflation by 414%.
Mentions: Quarterly tuition in 1970, as seen in Figure 7, was $255 and rose to $4,530 in 1998, a total increase of 1,676% in 28 years. Information from the catalogs revealed the tuition increased 194% in the 1970s, 114% in the 1980s and 101% in the 1990s. The increase of tuition from the $255 per quarter level in 1970 far exceeded the rate of inflation between 1970 and 1998. The $255 quarterly tuition adjusted for inflation to 1998 dollars would have risen to $1092. Thus, the $4,530 per quarter tuition in 1998 outpaced inflation by 414%.

Bottom Line: The 10-year attrition rate rose from 10% for those graduates licensed in 1970 to a peak of 27.8% in 1991.The 10-year attrition rate has since remained between 20-25% for the doctors licensed between 1992-1998.Available evidence supports the hypothesis that the attrition rate for licensed chiropractors in the first 10 years of practice has risen in the past several decades.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Private practice of chiropractic, West Hills, California, USA. smfdoc@sbcglobal.net.

ABSTRACT

Background: The authors hypothesized the attrition rate of licensed chiropractors in California has gradually increased over the past several decades. "Attrition" as determined for this study is defined as a loss of legal authority to practice chiropractic for any reason during the first 10 years after the license was issued. The percentage of license attrition after 10 years was determined for each group of graduates licensed in California each year between 1970 and 1998. The cost of tuition, the increase in the supply of licensed chiropractors and the ratio of licensed chiropractors to California residents were examined as possible influences on the rate of license attrition.

Methods: The attrition rate was determined by a retrospective analysis of license status data obtained from the California Department of Consumer Affairs. Other variables were determined from US Bureau of Census data, survey data from the American Chiropractic Association and catalogs from a US chiropractic college.

Results: The 10-year attrition rate rose from 10% for those graduates licensed in 1970 to a peak of 27.8% in 1991. The 10-year attrition rate has since remained between 20-25% for the doctors licensed between 1992-1998.

Conclusions: Available evidence supports the hypothesis that the attrition rate for licensed chiropractors in the first 10 years of practice has risen in the past several decades.

No MeSH data available.