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Hybrid visibility compositing and masking for illustrative rendering.

Bruckner S, Rautek P, Viola I, Roberts M, Sousa MC, Gröller ME - Comput Graph (2010)

Bottom Line: These tools behave just like in 2D, but their influence extends beyond a single viewpoint.Since the presented approach makes no assumptions about the underlying rendering algorithms, layers can be generated based on polygonal geometry, volumetric data, point-based representations, or others.Our implementation exploits current graphics hardware and permits real-time interaction and rendering.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Computer Graphics and Algorithms, Vienna University of Technology, Austria.

ABSTRACT
In this paper, we introduce a novel framework for the compositing of interactively rendered 3D layers tailored to the needs of scientific illustration. Currently, traditional scientific illustrations are produced in a series of composition stages, combining different pictorial elements using 2D digital layering. Our approach extends the layer metaphor into 3D without giving up the advantages of 2D methods. The new compositing approach allows for effects such as selective transparency, occlusion overrides, and soft depth buffering. Furthermore, we show how common manipulation techniques such as masking can be integrated into this concept. These tools behave just like in 2D, but their influence extends beyond a single viewpoint. Since the presented approach makes no assumptions about the underlying rendering algorithms, layers can be generated based on polygonal geometry, volumetric data, point-based representations, or others. Our implementation exploits current graphics hardware and permits real-time interaction and rendering.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Upper gastrointestinal tract: (a) 2D illustration generated using Adobe Photoshop; (b) 3D illustration generated using our compositing approach; and (c) different viewpoint of the 3D illustration. Illustrations courtesy of ©Kari C. Toverud, MS, CMI.
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fig7: Upper gastrointestinal tract: (a) 2D illustration generated using Adobe Photoshop; (b) 3D illustration generated using our compositing approach; and (c) different viewpoint of the 3D illustration. Illustrations courtesy of ©Kari C. Toverud, MS, CMI.

Mentions: Using our approach the process of creating a similar illustration, as shown in Fig. 6(b), is analogous. Given a suitable 3D model, the user assigns the respective objects to individual layers. The same three layers are used: body contours, pelvis, and internal reproductive organs. The opacity of the pelvis layer is adjusted and our masking tool is applied, just like in the 2D workflow. However, instead of manually specifying a mask to achieve the desired see-through effect for the internal structures, pelvis and reproductive organs simply form a visibility chain which is combined with the body layer using the over operator. This enables the generation of novel views without requiring any changes, as shown in Fig. 6(c). Fig. 7depicts a further example of how our approach allows the user to employ the same effects as in 2D illustrations (see Fig. 7(a) and (b)), but enables the easy generation of novel views with the same hybrid visibility order. Additional illustrations showing the same topic are therefore easily created, as demonstrated in Fig. 7(c).


Hybrid visibility compositing and masking for illustrative rendering.

Bruckner S, Rautek P, Viola I, Roberts M, Sousa MC, Gröller ME - Comput Graph (2010)

Upper gastrointestinal tract: (a) 2D illustration generated using Adobe Photoshop; (b) 3D illustration generated using our compositing approach; and (c) different viewpoint of the 3D illustration. Illustrations courtesy of ©Kari C. Toverud, MS, CMI.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2925605&req=5

fig7: Upper gastrointestinal tract: (a) 2D illustration generated using Adobe Photoshop; (b) 3D illustration generated using our compositing approach; and (c) different viewpoint of the 3D illustration. Illustrations courtesy of ©Kari C. Toverud, MS, CMI.
Mentions: Using our approach the process of creating a similar illustration, as shown in Fig. 6(b), is analogous. Given a suitable 3D model, the user assigns the respective objects to individual layers. The same three layers are used: body contours, pelvis, and internal reproductive organs. The opacity of the pelvis layer is adjusted and our masking tool is applied, just like in the 2D workflow. However, instead of manually specifying a mask to achieve the desired see-through effect for the internal structures, pelvis and reproductive organs simply form a visibility chain which is combined with the body layer using the over operator. This enables the generation of novel views without requiring any changes, as shown in Fig. 6(c). Fig. 7depicts a further example of how our approach allows the user to employ the same effects as in 2D illustrations (see Fig. 7(a) and (b)), but enables the easy generation of novel views with the same hybrid visibility order. Additional illustrations showing the same topic are therefore easily created, as demonstrated in Fig. 7(c).

Bottom Line: These tools behave just like in 2D, but their influence extends beyond a single viewpoint.Since the presented approach makes no assumptions about the underlying rendering algorithms, layers can be generated based on polygonal geometry, volumetric data, point-based representations, or others.Our implementation exploits current graphics hardware and permits real-time interaction and rendering.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Computer Graphics and Algorithms, Vienna University of Technology, Austria.

ABSTRACT
In this paper, we introduce a novel framework for the compositing of interactively rendered 3D layers tailored to the needs of scientific illustration. Currently, traditional scientific illustrations are produced in a series of composition stages, combining different pictorial elements using 2D digital layering. Our approach extends the layer metaphor into 3D without giving up the advantages of 2D methods. The new compositing approach allows for effects such as selective transparency, occlusion overrides, and soft depth buffering. Furthermore, we show how common manipulation techniques such as masking can be integrated into this concept. These tools behave just like in 2D, but their influence extends beyond a single viewpoint. Since the presented approach makes no assumptions about the underlying rendering algorithms, layers can be generated based on polygonal geometry, volumetric data, point-based representations, or others. Our implementation exploits current graphics hardware and permits real-time interaction and rendering.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus