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Immunity against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C in the Dutch population before and after introduction of the meningococcal c conjugate vaccine.

de Voer RM, Mollema L, Schepp RM, de Greeff SC, van Gageldonk PG, de Melker HE, Sanders EA, Berbers GA, van der Klis FR - PLoS ONE (2010)

Bottom Line: A comparable pattern was found for antibodies against the carrier protein in children immunized above 9 years of age.Whether the lower IgG poses individuals at increased risk for MenC disease should be carefully monitored.Large-scale introduction of a MenCC vaccine has led to improved protection in adolescents, but in infants a single-dose schedule may not provide sufficient protection on the long-term and therefore a booster-dose early in adolescence should be considered.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory for Infectious Diseases and Screening, National Institute of Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Background: In 2002 a Meningococcal serogroup C (MenC) conjugate vaccine, with tetanus toxoid as carrier protein, was introduced in the Netherlands as a single-dose at 14 months of age. A catch-up campaign was performed targeting all individuals aged 14 months to 18 years. We determined the MenC-specific immunity before and after introduction of the MenC conjugate (MenCC) vaccine.

Methods and findings: Two cross-sectional population-based serum banks, collected in 1995/1996 (n = 8539) and in 2006/2007 (n = 6386), were used for this study. The main outcome measurements were the levels of MenC polysaccharide(PS)-specific IgG and serum bactericidal antibodies (SBA) after routine immunization, 4-5 years after catch-up immunization or by natural immunity. There was an increasing persistence of PS-specific IgG and SBA with age in the catch-up immunized cohorts 4-5 years after their MenCC immunization (MenC PS-specific IgG, 0.25 microg/ml (95%CI: 0.19-0.31 microg/ml) at age 6 years, gradually increasing to 2.34 microg/ml,(95%CI: 1.70-3.32 microg/ml) at age 21-22 years). A comparable pattern was found for antibodies against the carrier protein in children immunized above 9 years of age. In case of vaccination before the age of 5 years, PS-specific IgG was rapidly lost. For all age-cohorts together, SBA seroprevalence (> or =8) increased from 19.7% to 43.0% in the pre- and post-MenC introduction eras, respectively. In non-immunized adults the SBA seroprevalence was not significantly different between the pre- and post-MenC introduction periods, whereas PS-specific IgG was significantly lower in the post-MenC vaccination (GMT, age > or =25 years, 0.10 microg/ml) era compared to the pre-vaccination (GMT, age > or =25 years, 0.43 microg/ml) era.

Conclusion: MenCC vaccination administered above 5 years of age induced high IgG levels compared to natural exposure, increasing with age. In children below 14 months of age and non-immunized cohorts lower IgG levels were observed compared to the pre-vaccination era, whereas functional levels remained similar in adults. Whether the lower IgG poses individuals at increased risk for MenC disease should be carefully monitored. Large-scale introduction of a MenCC vaccine has led to improved protection in adolescents, but in infants a single-dose schedule may not provide sufficient protection on the long-term and therefore a booster-dose early in adolescence should be considered.

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MenACYW-135 -specific IgG antibody levels.MenACYW-135 -specific IgG within each age (group) in the post-MenC introduction era. Age at bloodsampling is indicated in years or as stated otherwise (mo  =  age in months).
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pone-0012144-g002: MenACYW-135 -specific IgG antibody levels.MenACYW-135 -specific IgG within each age (group) in the post-MenC introduction era. Age at bloodsampling is indicated in years or as stated otherwise (mo  =  age in months).

Mentions: With respect to non-MenC IgG antibody levels in the post-MenC introduction era, meningococcal serogroups W-135 and –Y -specific IgG levels were low in all age categories (Fig. 2). Meningococcal serogroup A-specific IgG however increased with age and was significantly higher than MenC-specific IgG above 25 years of age (P<0.0001) (Fig. 2).


Immunity against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C in the Dutch population before and after introduction of the meningococcal c conjugate vaccine.

de Voer RM, Mollema L, Schepp RM, de Greeff SC, van Gageldonk PG, de Melker HE, Sanders EA, Berbers GA, van der Klis FR - PLoS ONE (2010)

MenACYW-135 -specific IgG antibody levels.MenACYW-135 -specific IgG within each age (group) in the post-MenC introduction era. Age at bloodsampling is indicated in years or as stated otherwise (mo  =  age in months).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2921331&req=5

pone-0012144-g002: MenACYW-135 -specific IgG antibody levels.MenACYW-135 -specific IgG within each age (group) in the post-MenC introduction era. Age at bloodsampling is indicated in years or as stated otherwise (mo  =  age in months).
Mentions: With respect to non-MenC IgG antibody levels in the post-MenC introduction era, meningococcal serogroups W-135 and –Y -specific IgG levels were low in all age categories (Fig. 2). Meningococcal serogroup A-specific IgG however increased with age and was significantly higher than MenC-specific IgG above 25 years of age (P<0.0001) (Fig. 2).

Bottom Line: A comparable pattern was found for antibodies against the carrier protein in children immunized above 9 years of age.Whether the lower IgG poses individuals at increased risk for MenC disease should be carefully monitored.Large-scale introduction of a MenCC vaccine has led to improved protection in adolescents, but in infants a single-dose schedule may not provide sufficient protection on the long-term and therefore a booster-dose early in adolescence should be considered.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory for Infectious Diseases and Screening, National Institute of Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Background: In 2002 a Meningococcal serogroup C (MenC) conjugate vaccine, with tetanus toxoid as carrier protein, was introduced in the Netherlands as a single-dose at 14 months of age. A catch-up campaign was performed targeting all individuals aged 14 months to 18 years. We determined the MenC-specific immunity before and after introduction of the MenC conjugate (MenCC) vaccine.

Methods and findings: Two cross-sectional population-based serum banks, collected in 1995/1996 (n = 8539) and in 2006/2007 (n = 6386), were used for this study. The main outcome measurements were the levels of MenC polysaccharide(PS)-specific IgG and serum bactericidal antibodies (SBA) after routine immunization, 4-5 years after catch-up immunization or by natural immunity. There was an increasing persistence of PS-specific IgG and SBA with age in the catch-up immunized cohorts 4-5 years after their MenCC immunization (MenC PS-specific IgG, 0.25 microg/ml (95%CI: 0.19-0.31 microg/ml) at age 6 years, gradually increasing to 2.34 microg/ml,(95%CI: 1.70-3.32 microg/ml) at age 21-22 years). A comparable pattern was found for antibodies against the carrier protein in children immunized above 9 years of age. In case of vaccination before the age of 5 years, PS-specific IgG was rapidly lost. For all age-cohorts together, SBA seroprevalence (> or =8) increased from 19.7% to 43.0% in the pre- and post-MenC introduction eras, respectively. In non-immunized adults the SBA seroprevalence was not significantly different between the pre- and post-MenC introduction periods, whereas PS-specific IgG was significantly lower in the post-MenC vaccination (GMT, age > or =25 years, 0.10 microg/ml) era compared to the pre-vaccination (GMT, age > or =25 years, 0.43 microg/ml) era.

Conclusion: MenCC vaccination administered above 5 years of age induced high IgG levels compared to natural exposure, increasing with age. In children below 14 months of age and non-immunized cohorts lower IgG levels were observed compared to the pre-vaccination era, whereas functional levels remained similar in adults. Whether the lower IgG poses individuals at increased risk for MenC disease should be carefully monitored. Large-scale introduction of a MenCC vaccine has led to improved protection in adolescents, but in infants a single-dose schedule may not provide sufficient protection on the long-term and therefore a booster-dose early in adolescence should be considered.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus