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Application of acoustic telemetry to assess residency and movements of rockfish and lingcod at created and natural habitats in Prince William Sound.

Reynolds BF, Powers SP, Bishop MA - PLoS ONE (2010)

Bottom Line: Five of the 12 rockfish returned within 10 d of their release to their initial capture site.Another five of the 12 displaced fish established residency at the artificial reef through the duration of our study.Our results suggest the potential for artificial reefs to provide rockfish habitat in the event of disturbances to natural habitat.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Marine Sciences, University of South Alabama and Dauphin Island Sea Lab, Dauphin Island, Alabama, USA. breynolds@pwssc.org

ABSTRACT
Loss and/or degradation of nearshore habitats have led to increased efforts to restore or enhance many of these habitats, particularly those that are deemed essential for marine fishes. Copper rockfish (Sebastes caurinus) and lingcod (Ophiodon enlongatus) are dominant members of the typical reef fish community that inhabit rocky and high-relief substrates along the Pacific Northwest. We used acoustic telemetry to document their residency and movements in the nearshore waters of Prince William Sound, Alaska in order to assess use of created reef habitat in an individual-based manner. A total of 57 fish were surgically implanted with acoustic transmitters. Forty-five fish were captured and monitored in three habitats: artificial reef, low-relief natural reef, and patchy high-relief natural reef. Within each habitat, both rockfish and lingcod exhibited long periods of residency with limited movements. Twelve rockfish were captured at the natural reefs and displaced a distance of 4.0 km to the artificial reef. Five of the 12 rockfish returned within 10 d of their release to their initial capture site. Another five of the 12 displaced fish established residency at the artificial reef through the duration of our study. Our results suggest the potential for artificial reefs to provide rockfish habitat in the event of disturbances to natural habitat.

Show MeSH
Length of residency at artificial and natural reef sites for acoustic-tagged fish.Fish were captured 26 June to 13 July and 17 to 23 August 2007 and monitored through 4 October 2007. Julian day 177 = 26 June; Julian day 277 = October 4.
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pone-0012130-g001: Length of residency at artificial and natural reef sites for acoustic-tagged fish.Fish were captured 26 June to 13 July and 17 to 23 August 2007 and monitored through 4 October 2007. Julian day 177 = 26 June; Julian day 277 = October 4.

Mentions: We obtained residency and movement data for 45 tagged fish. The majority of tagged fish (96%) demonstrated residency at their tagging sites for the duration of the study, approximately 14 weeks for individuals tagged in early summer, and seven weeks for fish tagged in mid-summer (Fig. 1). At the rock slide, six of the 11 tagged fish were detected variably by each of two receivers indicating a small range of lateral movement along the shoreline. One yelloweye rockfish tagged at the rock slide (#36) moved beyond the array on three occasions with absences ranging from 40 to 73 h. In addition, one copper rockfish (#25) moved beyond the Bush Banks pinnacle 2 array for a 28 h period shortly after initial release, and again for 9 d before returning to the array for the duration of the study. Three fish were detected moving between Bush Banks pinnacles 1 and 2. One of these fish, a lingcod (#28) moved only once to pinnacle 1 for a 14 hour period. One copper rockfish (#35) moved to pinnacle 1 on six occasions for periods of 10 h to 2 d. Another copper rockfish (#33) moved between pinnacles on five occasions, residing equally between each for periods of 1 h to 7 d before moving beyond the arrays after 24 d in the Bush Banks study area. Shoreline transects with the portable hydrophone detected none of the 45 fish outside of the three study areas during 24 August and 27 September 2007 surveys.


Application of acoustic telemetry to assess residency and movements of rockfish and lingcod at created and natural habitats in Prince William Sound.

Reynolds BF, Powers SP, Bishop MA - PLoS ONE (2010)

Length of residency at artificial and natural reef sites for acoustic-tagged fish.Fish were captured 26 June to 13 July and 17 to 23 August 2007 and monitored through 4 October 2007. Julian day 177 = 26 June; Julian day 277 = October 4.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2921330&req=5

pone-0012130-g001: Length of residency at artificial and natural reef sites for acoustic-tagged fish.Fish were captured 26 June to 13 July and 17 to 23 August 2007 and monitored through 4 October 2007. Julian day 177 = 26 June; Julian day 277 = October 4.
Mentions: We obtained residency and movement data for 45 tagged fish. The majority of tagged fish (96%) demonstrated residency at their tagging sites for the duration of the study, approximately 14 weeks for individuals tagged in early summer, and seven weeks for fish tagged in mid-summer (Fig. 1). At the rock slide, six of the 11 tagged fish were detected variably by each of two receivers indicating a small range of lateral movement along the shoreline. One yelloweye rockfish tagged at the rock slide (#36) moved beyond the array on three occasions with absences ranging from 40 to 73 h. In addition, one copper rockfish (#25) moved beyond the Bush Banks pinnacle 2 array for a 28 h period shortly after initial release, and again for 9 d before returning to the array for the duration of the study. Three fish were detected moving between Bush Banks pinnacles 1 and 2. One of these fish, a lingcod (#28) moved only once to pinnacle 1 for a 14 hour period. One copper rockfish (#35) moved to pinnacle 1 on six occasions for periods of 10 h to 2 d. Another copper rockfish (#33) moved between pinnacles on five occasions, residing equally between each for periods of 1 h to 7 d before moving beyond the arrays after 24 d in the Bush Banks study area. Shoreline transects with the portable hydrophone detected none of the 45 fish outside of the three study areas during 24 August and 27 September 2007 surveys.

Bottom Line: Five of the 12 rockfish returned within 10 d of their release to their initial capture site.Another five of the 12 displaced fish established residency at the artificial reef through the duration of our study.Our results suggest the potential for artificial reefs to provide rockfish habitat in the event of disturbances to natural habitat.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Marine Sciences, University of South Alabama and Dauphin Island Sea Lab, Dauphin Island, Alabama, USA. breynolds@pwssc.org

ABSTRACT
Loss and/or degradation of nearshore habitats have led to increased efforts to restore or enhance many of these habitats, particularly those that are deemed essential for marine fishes. Copper rockfish (Sebastes caurinus) and lingcod (Ophiodon enlongatus) are dominant members of the typical reef fish community that inhabit rocky and high-relief substrates along the Pacific Northwest. We used acoustic telemetry to document their residency and movements in the nearshore waters of Prince William Sound, Alaska in order to assess use of created reef habitat in an individual-based manner. A total of 57 fish were surgically implanted with acoustic transmitters. Forty-five fish were captured and monitored in three habitats: artificial reef, low-relief natural reef, and patchy high-relief natural reef. Within each habitat, both rockfish and lingcod exhibited long periods of residency with limited movements. Twelve rockfish were captured at the natural reefs and displaced a distance of 4.0 km to the artificial reef. Five of the 12 rockfish returned within 10 d of their release to their initial capture site. Another five of the 12 displaced fish established residency at the artificial reef through the duration of our study. Our results suggest the potential for artificial reefs to provide rockfish habitat in the event of disturbances to natural habitat.

Show MeSH