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Choroidal neovascularization due to punctate inner choroidopathy: long-term follow-up and review of literature.

Brouzas D, Charakidas A, Rotsos T, Moschos MM, Loukianou H, Koutsandrea C, Ladas I, Baltatzis S - Clin Ophthalmol (2010)

Bottom Line: The size of the neovascular lesion, including both CNV and subretinal fibrosis, increased in all cases left untreated (55.6%) and remained stable in all cases treated with PDT (44.4%).Without treatment, the CNV due to PIC is slowly progressive.Our short cohort appears to have benefited from PDT in terms of maintaining visual acuity and stabilizing the extent of CNV and fibrosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: First Department of Ophthalmology, University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece. brouzas@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The aim of the article was to report on the long-term follow-up of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) cases secondary to punctate inner choroidopathy (PIC) either treated with photodynamic therapy (PDT) or followed without treatment. A comprehensive review of existing literature on the various treatment modalities is incorporated.

Methods: Nine eyes of 8 female patients with CNV due to PIC were followed retrospectively for an average of 105 months (range, 36-162 months). Mean age of the patient cohort on presentation was 28 years (range, 21-39). Four eyes were treated with PDT, whereas in 4 patients, including 1 with bilateral involvement, the disease followed its natural course without treatment. Snellen visual acuity and the extent of neovascularization and subretinal fibrosis were evaluated on presentation and at the end of the follow-up period.

Results: Improvement of vision was observed in 6 eyes (66.7%), including all cases treated with PDT, and in 2 of 5 eyes left untreated. The size of the neovascular lesion, including both CNV and subretinal fibrosis, increased in all cases left untreated (55.6%) and remained stable in all cases treated with PDT (44.4%).

Conclusion: Without treatment, the CNV due to PIC is slowly progressive. Our short cohort appears to have benefited from PDT in terms of maintaining visual acuity and stabilizing the extent of CNV and fibrosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Case 6. Choroidal neovascularization without photodynamic therapy treatment. A) On presentation. B) At the end of 134-month follow-up period. There is an apparent increase of choroidal neovascularization.
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f2-opth-4-871: Case 6. Choroidal neovascularization without photodynamic therapy treatment. A) On presentation. B) At the end of 134-month follow-up period. There is an apparent increase of choroidal neovascularization.

Mentions: A 24-year-old female myopic patient ([OD −3.0 to 0.75 × 115] and [OS −4.0 D]) was initially referred in December 1995 with right eye visual impairment and metamorphopsia. BCVA on presentation was 20/70 OD and 20/25 OS. Fundus examination revealed a small exudative lesion that was leaking on FA in the right eye (Figure 2A) and several creamy, yellow-white lesions in the left eye with faint staining in the late phases of FA. None of the current treatment options was deemed effective, and the disease was left to follow its natural course. Three years later, an increase of the size of CNV was noted on FA, although visual acuity had improved to 20/30 OD. In subsequent follow-ups, visual acuity remained stable. On her last visit 11 years after the diagnosis of PIC, visual acuity was 20/30 in the right eye and 20/25 in the left eye, the FA showed juxtafoveal lesions with staining but without leakage in the right eye (Figure 2A) and some scattered chorioretinal slightly pigmented small lesion in the left eye.


Choroidal neovascularization due to punctate inner choroidopathy: long-term follow-up and review of literature.

Brouzas D, Charakidas A, Rotsos T, Moschos MM, Loukianou H, Koutsandrea C, Ladas I, Baltatzis S - Clin Ophthalmol (2010)

Case 6. Choroidal neovascularization without photodynamic therapy treatment. A) On presentation. B) At the end of 134-month follow-up period. There is an apparent increase of choroidal neovascularization.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2921295&req=5

f2-opth-4-871: Case 6. Choroidal neovascularization without photodynamic therapy treatment. A) On presentation. B) At the end of 134-month follow-up period. There is an apparent increase of choroidal neovascularization.
Mentions: A 24-year-old female myopic patient ([OD −3.0 to 0.75 × 115] and [OS −4.0 D]) was initially referred in December 1995 with right eye visual impairment and metamorphopsia. BCVA on presentation was 20/70 OD and 20/25 OS. Fundus examination revealed a small exudative lesion that was leaking on FA in the right eye (Figure 2A) and several creamy, yellow-white lesions in the left eye with faint staining in the late phases of FA. None of the current treatment options was deemed effective, and the disease was left to follow its natural course. Three years later, an increase of the size of CNV was noted on FA, although visual acuity had improved to 20/30 OD. In subsequent follow-ups, visual acuity remained stable. On her last visit 11 years after the diagnosis of PIC, visual acuity was 20/30 in the right eye and 20/25 in the left eye, the FA showed juxtafoveal lesions with staining but without leakage in the right eye (Figure 2A) and some scattered chorioretinal slightly pigmented small lesion in the left eye.

Bottom Line: The size of the neovascular lesion, including both CNV and subretinal fibrosis, increased in all cases left untreated (55.6%) and remained stable in all cases treated with PDT (44.4%).Without treatment, the CNV due to PIC is slowly progressive.Our short cohort appears to have benefited from PDT in terms of maintaining visual acuity and stabilizing the extent of CNV and fibrosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: First Department of Ophthalmology, University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece. brouzas@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The aim of the article was to report on the long-term follow-up of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) cases secondary to punctate inner choroidopathy (PIC) either treated with photodynamic therapy (PDT) or followed without treatment. A comprehensive review of existing literature on the various treatment modalities is incorporated.

Methods: Nine eyes of 8 female patients with CNV due to PIC were followed retrospectively for an average of 105 months (range, 36-162 months). Mean age of the patient cohort on presentation was 28 years (range, 21-39). Four eyes were treated with PDT, whereas in 4 patients, including 1 with bilateral involvement, the disease followed its natural course without treatment. Snellen visual acuity and the extent of neovascularization and subretinal fibrosis were evaluated on presentation and at the end of the follow-up period.

Results: Improvement of vision was observed in 6 eyes (66.7%), including all cases treated with PDT, and in 2 of 5 eyes left untreated. The size of the neovascular lesion, including both CNV and subretinal fibrosis, increased in all cases left untreated (55.6%) and remained stable in all cases treated with PDT (44.4%).

Conclusion: Without treatment, the CNV due to PIC is slowly progressive. Our short cohort appears to have benefited from PDT in terms of maintaining visual acuity and stabilizing the extent of CNV and fibrosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus