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Tabinfo Asia 2009, the tobacco industry exhibition and conference held in Bangkok last November and billed as the ‘Greatest Tobacco Industry Show in Asia’, was dealt a severe blow by Thai health advocates, further consolidating Thailand's position as a world leader in tobacco control... The tobacco industry is rapidly expanding its markets in Asia and Tabinfo Asia was all about how to expedite that growth and hook more Asians... To counter the event, Thai tobacco control advocates worked together as the Thai Network Against Tabinfo Asia 2009, an alliance of more than 500 organisations from health and educational institutions... The ministry of public health then announced that it was against Tabinfo Asia 2009, that as a Party to the FCTC, Thailand had strict tobacco control laws, and that it would be monitoring the event very closely... So when SFZ said in its Der Spiegel ad that the foundation had an eye to the sustainability of society, it seemed to be trumpeting the good news that what it actually had an eye on, and not an unrealistic one, was the sustainability of BAT... Naturally, there was no mention in the ad, or on the SFZ website, of the foundation being funded by products that are totally inconsistent with the sustainability of German people's health... Last October, Canada's parliament approved legislation to ban flavoured cigarettes, little cigars (cigarillos) and blunt wraps (similar to rolling paper, but made of tobacco)... Known as Bill C-32, the new legislation to amend the existing tobacco law was adopted with support from all political parties and despite intensive lobbying by Philip Morris International (PMI) and its Canadian subsidiary, Rothmans, Benson & Hedges Inc (RBH)... The flavours ban takes effect from 5 July 2010 at the retail level... Little cigar sales increased from 53 million units in 2001 to 469 million in 2008... Virtually all little cigars sold in Canada are flavoured, with flavours such as chocolate, vanilla, mint, strawberry, cherry, and peach, among others. 2008 research found that 9% of young people aged 15–19 had smoked little cigars in the previous 30 days, and that 12% of 20–24-year-olds had done so, compared to only 3% of those aged 25 and over... Queenslanders caught breaking the new law face A$200 (US$180) on-the-spot fines... Making cars with child passengers smoke-free has been one of the key targets of Australia's Protecting Children from Tobacco coalition of 40 non-government organisations—the alliance of child welfare, parent, teacher, health, church and other groups also having significant success in getting tobacco products out of sight in shops and making outdoor dining areas, children's playgrounds and patrolled beaches smoke-free. [Further details: www.ashaust.org.au/lv3/action_POS.htm] STAFFORD SANDERS ASH Australia staffords@ashaust.org.au The tobacco industry suffered its first defeat in Switzerland last November when it tried to sue the health advocacy group OxyRomandie, but had its case dismissed and failed to file an appeal... Like many TB doctors, he later focused on a new scourge, tobacco induced disease... He saw the need for decision makers to take preventative action and helped found Action on Smoking and Health (ASH) in the UK, and Scottish ASH, of which his wife Dr Eileen Crofton became medical director.

No MeSH data available.


Canada: an example of a colourful pack of flavoured small cigars, now to be banned.
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fig4: Canada: an example of a colourful pack of flavoured small cigars, now to be banned.


News analysis
Canada: an example of a colourful pack of flavoured small cigars, now to be banned.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2921254&req=5

fig4: Canada: an example of a colourful pack of flavoured small cigars, now to be banned.

View Article: PubMed Central

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Tabinfo Asia 2009, the tobacco industry exhibition and conference held in Bangkok last November and billed as the ‘Greatest Tobacco Industry Show in Asia’, was dealt a severe blow by Thai health advocates, further consolidating Thailand's position as a world leader in tobacco control... The tobacco industry is rapidly expanding its markets in Asia and Tabinfo Asia was all about how to expedite that growth and hook more Asians... To counter the event, Thai tobacco control advocates worked together as the Thai Network Against Tabinfo Asia 2009, an alliance of more than 500 organisations from health and educational institutions... The ministry of public health then announced that it was against Tabinfo Asia 2009, that as a Party to the FCTC, Thailand had strict tobacco control laws, and that it would be monitoring the event very closely... So when SFZ said in its Der Spiegel ad that the foundation had an eye to the sustainability of society, it seemed to be trumpeting the good news that what it actually had an eye on, and not an unrealistic one, was the sustainability of BAT... Naturally, there was no mention in the ad, or on the SFZ website, of the foundation being funded by products that are totally inconsistent with the sustainability of German people's health... Last October, Canada's parliament approved legislation to ban flavoured cigarettes, little cigars (cigarillos) and blunt wraps (similar to rolling paper, but made of tobacco)... Known as Bill C-32, the new legislation to amend the existing tobacco law was adopted with support from all political parties and despite intensive lobbying by Philip Morris International (PMI) and its Canadian subsidiary, Rothmans, Benson & Hedges Inc (RBH)... The flavours ban takes effect from 5 July 2010 at the retail level... Little cigar sales increased from 53 million units in 2001 to 469 million in 2008... Virtually all little cigars sold in Canada are flavoured, with flavours such as chocolate, vanilla, mint, strawberry, cherry, and peach, among others. 2008 research found that 9% of young people aged 15–19 had smoked little cigars in the previous 30 days, and that 12% of 20–24-year-olds had done so, compared to only 3% of those aged 25 and over... Queenslanders caught breaking the new law face A$200 (US$180) on-the-spot fines... Making cars with child passengers smoke-free has been one of the key targets of Australia's Protecting Children from Tobacco coalition of 40 non-government organisations—the alliance of child welfare, parent, teacher, health, church and other groups also having significant success in getting tobacco products out of sight in shops and making outdoor dining areas, children's playgrounds and patrolled beaches smoke-free. [Further details: www.ashaust.org.au/lv3/action_POS.htm] STAFFORD SANDERS ASH Australia staffords@ashaust.org.au The tobacco industry suffered its first defeat in Switzerland last November when it tried to sue the health advocacy group OxyRomandie, but had its case dismissed and failed to file an appeal... Like many TB doctors, he later focused on a new scourge, tobacco induced disease... He saw the need for decision makers to take preventative action and helped found Action on Smoking and Health (ASH) in the UK, and Scottish ASH, of which his wife Dr Eileen Crofton became medical director.

No MeSH data available.