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A comparative study of salt tolerance parameters in 11 wild relatives of Arabidopsis thaliana.

Orsini F, D'Urzo MP, Inan G, Serra S, Oh DH, Mickelbart MV, Consiglio F, Li X, Jeong JC, Yun DJ, Bohnert HJ, Bressan RA, Maggio A - J. Exp. Bot. (2010)

Bottom Line: In a search for candidates to begin to understand, through genetic analyses, the biological bases of salt tolerance, 11 wild relatives of Arabidopsis thaliana were compared: Barbarea verna, Capsella bursa-pastoris, Hirschfeldia incana, Lepidium densiflorum, Malcolmia triloba, Lepidium virginicum, Descurainia pinnata, Sisymbrium officinale, Thellungiella parvula, Thellungiella salsuginea (previously T. halophila), and Thlaspi arvense.Only T. parvula revealed a true halophytic habitus, comparable to the better studied Thellungiella salsuginea.Major differences in growth, water transport properties, and ion accumulation are observed and discussed to describe the distinctive traits and physiological responses that can now be studied genetically in salt stress research.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Agro-environmental Sciences and Technologies, University of Bologna, Viale Fanin 44, I-40127 Bologna, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Salinity is an abiotic stress that limits both yield and the expansion of agricultural crops to new areas. In the last 20 years our basic understanding of the mechanisms underlying plant tolerance and adaptation to saline environments has greatly improved owing to active development of advanced tools in molecular, genomics, and bioinformatics analyses. However, the full potential of investigative power has not been fully exploited, because the use of halophytes as model systems in plant salt tolerance research is largely neglected. The recent introduction of halophytic Arabidopsis-Relative Model Species (ARMS) has begun to compare and relate several unique genetic resources to the well-developed Arabidopsis model. In a search for candidates to begin to understand, through genetic analyses, the biological bases of salt tolerance, 11 wild relatives of Arabidopsis thaliana were compared: Barbarea verna, Capsella bursa-pastoris, Hirschfeldia incana, Lepidium densiflorum, Malcolmia triloba, Lepidium virginicum, Descurainia pinnata, Sisymbrium officinale, Thellungiella parvula, Thellungiella salsuginea (previously T. halophila), and Thlaspi arvense. Among these species, highly salt-tolerant (L. densiflorum and L. virginicum) and moderately salt-tolerant (M. triloba and H. incana) species were identified. Only T. parvula revealed a true halophytic habitus, comparable to the better studied Thellungiella salsuginea. Major differences in growth, water transport properties, and ion accumulation are observed and discussed to describe the distinctive traits and physiological responses that can now be studied genetically in salt stress research.

Show MeSH
Stomatal length (A) and density (B) of selected Brassicaceae species. Values refer to 20 independent measures per leaf on three leaves per species (non-salinized control plants). Letters indicate differences at P <0.05 (n=60).
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fig6: Stomatal length (A) and density (B) of selected Brassicaceae species. Values refer to 20 independent measures per leaf on three leaves per species (non-salinized control plants). Letters indicate differences at P <0.05 (n=60).

Mentions: Differences in stomatal size and density were found among the five species under assessment (Fig. 6A, B). The stomata of these plants were very similar in width (shorter axis), whereas major differences were found in terms of stomatal length (longer axis). The shortest stomata (Fig. 6A) were detected in T. parvula and T. salsuginea, whereas the stomata of L. virginicum and A. thaliana were significantly longer than those in D. pinnata. Interestingly, lower stomatal size was correlated to higher stomatal density (Fig. 6B).


A comparative study of salt tolerance parameters in 11 wild relatives of Arabidopsis thaliana.

Orsini F, D'Urzo MP, Inan G, Serra S, Oh DH, Mickelbart MV, Consiglio F, Li X, Jeong JC, Yun DJ, Bohnert HJ, Bressan RA, Maggio A - J. Exp. Bot. (2010)

Stomatal length (A) and density (B) of selected Brassicaceae species. Values refer to 20 independent measures per leaf on three leaves per species (non-salinized control plants). Letters indicate differences at P <0.05 (n=60).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2921208&req=5

fig6: Stomatal length (A) and density (B) of selected Brassicaceae species. Values refer to 20 independent measures per leaf on three leaves per species (non-salinized control plants). Letters indicate differences at P <0.05 (n=60).
Mentions: Differences in stomatal size and density were found among the five species under assessment (Fig. 6A, B). The stomata of these plants were very similar in width (shorter axis), whereas major differences were found in terms of stomatal length (longer axis). The shortest stomata (Fig. 6A) were detected in T. parvula and T. salsuginea, whereas the stomata of L. virginicum and A. thaliana were significantly longer than those in D. pinnata. Interestingly, lower stomatal size was correlated to higher stomatal density (Fig. 6B).

Bottom Line: In a search for candidates to begin to understand, through genetic analyses, the biological bases of salt tolerance, 11 wild relatives of Arabidopsis thaliana were compared: Barbarea verna, Capsella bursa-pastoris, Hirschfeldia incana, Lepidium densiflorum, Malcolmia triloba, Lepidium virginicum, Descurainia pinnata, Sisymbrium officinale, Thellungiella parvula, Thellungiella salsuginea (previously T. halophila), and Thlaspi arvense.Only T. parvula revealed a true halophytic habitus, comparable to the better studied Thellungiella salsuginea.Major differences in growth, water transport properties, and ion accumulation are observed and discussed to describe the distinctive traits and physiological responses that can now be studied genetically in salt stress research.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Agro-environmental Sciences and Technologies, University of Bologna, Viale Fanin 44, I-40127 Bologna, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Salinity is an abiotic stress that limits both yield and the expansion of agricultural crops to new areas. In the last 20 years our basic understanding of the mechanisms underlying plant tolerance and adaptation to saline environments has greatly improved owing to active development of advanced tools in molecular, genomics, and bioinformatics analyses. However, the full potential of investigative power has not been fully exploited, because the use of halophytes as model systems in plant salt tolerance research is largely neglected. The recent introduction of halophytic Arabidopsis-Relative Model Species (ARMS) has begun to compare and relate several unique genetic resources to the well-developed Arabidopsis model. In a search for candidates to begin to understand, through genetic analyses, the biological bases of salt tolerance, 11 wild relatives of Arabidopsis thaliana were compared: Barbarea verna, Capsella bursa-pastoris, Hirschfeldia incana, Lepidium densiflorum, Malcolmia triloba, Lepidium virginicum, Descurainia pinnata, Sisymbrium officinale, Thellungiella parvula, Thellungiella salsuginea (previously T. halophila), and Thlaspi arvense. Among these species, highly salt-tolerant (L. densiflorum and L. virginicum) and moderately salt-tolerant (M. triloba and H. incana) species were identified. Only T. parvula revealed a true halophytic habitus, comparable to the better studied Thellungiella salsuginea. Major differences in growth, water transport properties, and ion accumulation are observed and discussed to describe the distinctive traits and physiological responses that can now be studied genetically in salt stress research.

Show MeSH