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Transcriptional profiles of drought-responsive genes in modulating transcription signal transduction, and biochemical pathways in tomato.

Gong P, Zhang J, Li H, Yang C, Zhang C, Zhang X, Khurram Z, Zhang Y, Wang T, Fei Z, Ye Z - J. Exp. Bot. (2010)

Bottom Line: Moreover, key enzymes in the pathways of gluconeogenesis (fructose-bisphosphate aldolase), purine and pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis (adenylate kinase), tryptophan degradation (aldehyde oxidase), starch degradation (beta-amylase), methionine biosynthesis (cystathionine beta-lyase), and the removal of superoxide radicals (catalase) were also specifically affected by drought stress.These results indicated that tomato plants could adapt to water-deficit conditions through decreasing energy dissipation, increasing ATP energy provision, and reducing oxidative damage.The drought-responsive genes identified in this study could provide further information for understanding the mechanisms of drought tolerance in tomato.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Key Laboratory of Crop Genetic Improvement, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070, China.

ABSTRACT
To unravel the molecular mechanisms of drought responses in tomato, gene expression profiles of two drought-tolerant lines identified from a population of Solanum pennellii introgression lines, and the recurrent parent S. lycopersicum cv. M82, a drought-sensitive cultivar, were investigated under drought stress using tomato microarrays. Around 400 genes identified were responsive to drought stress only in the drought-tolerant lines. These changes in genes expression are most likely caused by the two inserted chromosome segments of S. pennellii, which possibly contain drought-tolerance quantitative trait loci (QTLs). Among these genes are a number of transcription factors and signalling proteins which could be global regulators involved in the tomato responses to drought stress. Genes involved in organism growth and development processes were also specifically regulated by drought stress, including those controlling cell wall structure, wax biosynthesis, and plant height. Moreover, key enzymes in the pathways of gluconeogenesis (fructose-bisphosphate aldolase), purine and pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis (adenylate kinase), tryptophan degradation (aldehyde oxidase), starch degradation (beta-amylase), methionine biosynthesis (cystathionine beta-lyase), and the removal of superoxide radicals (catalase) were also specifically affected by drought stress. These results indicated that tomato plants could adapt to water-deficit conditions through decreasing energy dissipation, increasing ATP energy provision, and reducing oxidative damage. The drought-responsive genes identified in this study could provide further information for understanding the mechanisms of drought tolerance in tomato.

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Seed germination patterns of S. pennellii and M82 under water irrigated and PEG treatment conditions. Vertical bars represent standard error of means. W, water irrigation; P, PEG treatment.
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fig1: Seed germination patterns of S. pennellii and M82 under water irrigated and PEG treatment conditions. Vertical bars represent standard error of means. W, water irrigation; P, PEG treatment.

Mentions: S. pennellii (LA716) has been assigned in TGRC as one of the stress-tolerant accessions. In this study, drought tolerance between S. pennellii and S. lycopersicum cv. M82 were also compared. Under normal conditions, the seeds of S. pennellii germinated faster than those of M82, however, no significant difference in the final germination rate was observed between the two genotypes. While under drought stress, the final germination rate of S. pennellii was significantly higher than that of M82 (Fig. 1). In addition, young seedlings of S. pennellii under drought stress for one month had lush green leaves except for the bottom first and second leaves; while most plants of M82 were dead and the leaves at the bottom and middle of the plants which survived turned yellow. All the above results supported that S. pennellii was more tolerant to drought stress than M82.


Transcriptional profiles of drought-responsive genes in modulating transcription signal transduction, and biochemical pathways in tomato.

Gong P, Zhang J, Li H, Yang C, Zhang C, Zhang X, Khurram Z, Zhang Y, Wang T, Fei Z, Ye Z - J. Exp. Bot. (2010)

Seed germination patterns of S. pennellii and M82 under water irrigated and PEG treatment conditions. Vertical bars represent standard error of means. W, water irrigation; P, PEG treatment.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2921197&req=5

fig1: Seed germination patterns of S. pennellii and M82 under water irrigated and PEG treatment conditions. Vertical bars represent standard error of means. W, water irrigation; P, PEG treatment.
Mentions: S. pennellii (LA716) has been assigned in TGRC as one of the stress-tolerant accessions. In this study, drought tolerance between S. pennellii and S. lycopersicum cv. M82 were also compared. Under normal conditions, the seeds of S. pennellii germinated faster than those of M82, however, no significant difference in the final germination rate was observed between the two genotypes. While under drought stress, the final germination rate of S. pennellii was significantly higher than that of M82 (Fig. 1). In addition, young seedlings of S. pennellii under drought stress for one month had lush green leaves except for the bottom first and second leaves; while most plants of M82 were dead and the leaves at the bottom and middle of the plants which survived turned yellow. All the above results supported that S. pennellii was more tolerant to drought stress than M82.

Bottom Line: Moreover, key enzymes in the pathways of gluconeogenesis (fructose-bisphosphate aldolase), purine and pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis (adenylate kinase), tryptophan degradation (aldehyde oxidase), starch degradation (beta-amylase), methionine biosynthesis (cystathionine beta-lyase), and the removal of superoxide radicals (catalase) were also specifically affected by drought stress.These results indicated that tomato plants could adapt to water-deficit conditions through decreasing energy dissipation, increasing ATP energy provision, and reducing oxidative damage.The drought-responsive genes identified in this study could provide further information for understanding the mechanisms of drought tolerance in tomato.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Key Laboratory of Crop Genetic Improvement, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070, China.

ABSTRACT
To unravel the molecular mechanisms of drought responses in tomato, gene expression profiles of two drought-tolerant lines identified from a population of Solanum pennellii introgression lines, and the recurrent parent S. lycopersicum cv. M82, a drought-sensitive cultivar, were investigated under drought stress using tomato microarrays. Around 400 genes identified were responsive to drought stress only in the drought-tolerant lines. These changes in genes expression are most likely caused by the two inserted chromosome segments of S. pennellii, which possibly contain drought-tolerance quantitative trait loci (QTLs). Among these genes are a number of transcription factors and signalling proteins which could be global regulators involved in the tomato responses to drought stress. Genes involved in organism growth and development processes were also specifically regulated by drought stress, including those controlling cell wall structure, wax biosynthesis, and plant height. Moreover, key enzymes in the pathways of gluconeogenesis (fructose-bisphosphate aldolase), purine and pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis (adenylate kinase), tryptophan degradation (aldehyde oxidase), starch degradation (beta-amylase), methionine biosynthesis (cystathionine beta-lyase), and the removal of superoxide radicals (catalase) were also specifically affected by drought stress. These results indicated that tomato plants could adapt to water-deficit conditions through decreasing energy dissipation, increasing ATP energy provision, and reducing oxidative damage. The drought-responsive genes identified in this study could provide further information for understanding the mechanisms of drought tolerance in tomato.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus