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Evaluation of MR imaging findings differentiating cavernous haemangiomas from schwannomas in the orbit.

Xian J, Zhang Z, Wang Z, Li J, Yang B, Chen Q, Chang Q, He L - Eur Radiol (2010)

Bottom Line: Magnetic resonance imaging including T1- and T2-weighted imaging and contrast-enhanced MR imaging was performed in 43 patients with cavernous haemangiomas and 16 patients with schwannomas confirmed by pathology.Cavernous haemangiomas and schwannomas have different MR imaging features that could be helpful in the differentiation between the tumours.The spread pattern of the contrast enhancement on dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging is the most reliable finding distinguishing cavernous haemangiomas from schwannomas.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Capital Medical University, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Beijing 100730, China. cjr.xianjunfang@vip.163.com

ABSTRACT

Objective: It is important to distinguish between orbital cavernous haemangioma and schwannoma because the treatments of choice for the two tumours are different. The aim was to evaluate MR imaging findings distinguishing the two tumours.

Methods: Magnetic resonance imaging including T1- and T2-weighted imaging and contrast-enhanced MR imaging was performed in 43 patients with cavernous haemangiomas and 16 patients with schwannomas confirmed by pathology. Location, configuration, margins, signal intensity, homogeneity and enhancement pattern of the tumour were retrospectively evaluated.

Results: There was a significant difference between cavernous haemangiomas and schwannomas regarding the location, configuration and margins of the mass, signal intensity and homogeneity on T1- and T2-weighted imaging, the spread pattern of contrast enhancement, the enhancement pattern and the type of time-intensity curve (P<0.05). Markedly homogeneous hyperintensity signal on T2-weighted imaging and the spread pattern of the contrast enhancement favoured cavernous haemangioma rather than schwannoma (P<0.01).

Conclusion: Cavernous haemangiomas and schwannomas have different MR imaging features that could be helpful in the differentiation between the tumours. The spread pattern of the contrast enhancement on dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging is the most reliable finding distinguishing cavernous haemangiomas from schwannomas.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

A 47-year-old woman with schwannoma. a Obliquely sagittal T1-weighted imaging identified an irregular extraconal tumour with isointensity of the anterior portion of the tumour (arrow) and slight hypointensity of the posterior portion (arrowhead) relative to muscle. b Axial T2-weighted imaging showed isointensity of the anterior portion of the tumour (arrow) and hyperintensity of the posterior portion (arrowhead) relative to muscle. c Obliquely sagittal post-contrast T1-weighted imaging demonstrated enhancement of the anterior portion of the tumour (arrow) and no enhancement of the posterior portion (arrowhead)
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Fig3: A 47-year-old woman with schwannoma. a Obliquely sagittal T1-weighted imaging identified an irregular extraconal tumour with isointensity of the anterior portion of the tumour (arrow) and slight hypointensity of the posterior portion (arrowhead) relative to muscle. b Axial T2-weighted imaging showed isointensity of the anterior portion of the tumour (arrow) and hyperintensity of the posterior portion (arrowhead) relative to muscle. c Obliquely sagittal post-contrast T1-weighted imaging demonstrated enhancement of the anterior portion of the tumour (arrow) and no enhancement of the posterior portion (arrowhead)

Mentions: Tables 1 and 2 describe the frequency distribution of non-enhanced MR imaging features (Table 1) and contrast-enhanced MR imaging features (Table 2). There was a significant difference between cavernous haemangiomas and schwannomas regarding the location (including anterior orbit, posterior orbit, or both anterior and posterior orbit; extraconal or intraconal space), configuration and margins of the mass, signal intensity and homogeneity on T1- and T2-weighted imaging, the spread pattern of the contrast enhancement, enhancement pattern and type of time–intensity curve (TIC) (P < 0.05) (Figs. 1, 2, 3).Fig. 2


Evaluation of MR imaging findings differentiating cavernous haemangiomas from schwannomas in the orbit.

Xian J, Zhang Z, Wang Z, Li J, Yang B, Chen Q, Chang Q, He L - Eur Radiol (2010)

A 47-year-old woman with schwannoma. a Obliquely sagittal T1-weighted imaging identified an irregular extraconal tumour with isointensity of the anterior portion of the tumour (arrow) and slight hypointensity of the posterior portion (arrowhead) relative to muscle. b Axial T2-weighted imaging showed isointensity of the anterior portion of the tumour (arrow) and hyperintensity of the posterior portion (arrowhead) relative to muscle. c Obliquely sagittal post-contrast T1-weighted imaging demonstrated enhancement of the anterior portion of the tumour (arrow) and no enhancement of the posterior portion (arrowhead)
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2914262&req=5

Fig3: A 47-year-old woman with schwannoma. a Obliquely sagittal T1-weighted imaging identified an irregular extraconal tumour with isointensity of the anterior portion of the tumour (arrow) and slight hypointensity of the posterior portion (arrowhead) relative to muscle. b Axial T2-weighted imaging showed isointensity of the anterior portion of the tumour (arrow) and hyperintensity of the posterior portion (arrowhead) relative to muscle. c Obliquely sagittal post-contrast T1-weighted imaging demonstrated enhancement of the anterior portion of the tumour (arrow) and no enhancement of the posterior portion (arrowhead)
Mentions: Tables 1 and 2 describe the frequency distribution of non-enhanced MR imaging features (Table 1) and contrast-enhanced MR imaging features (Table 2). There was a significant difference between cavernous haemangiomas and schwannomas regarding the location (including anterior orbit, posterior orbit, or both anterior and posterior orbit; extraconal or intraconal space), configuration and margins of the mass, signal intensity and homogeneity on T1- and T2-weighted imaging, the spread pattern of the contrast enhancement, enhancement pattern and type of time–intensity curve (TIC) (P < 0.05) (Figs. 1, 2, 3).Fig. 2

Bottom Line: Magnetic resonance imaging including T1- and T2-weighted imaging and contrast-enhanced MR imaging was performed in 43 patients with cavernous haemangiomas and 16 patients with schwannomas confirmed by pathology.Cavernous haemangiomas and schwannomas have different MR imaging features that could be helpful in the differentiation between the tumours.The spread pattern of the contrast enhancement on dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging is the most reliable finding distinguishing cavernous haemangiomas from schwannomas.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Capital Medical University, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Beijing 100730, China. cjr.xianjunfang@vip.163.com

ABSTRACT

Objective: It is important to distinguish between orbital cavernous haemangioma and schwannoma because the treatments of choice for the two tumours are different. The aim was to evaluate MR imaging findings distinguishing the two tumours.

Methods: Magnetic resonance imaging including T1- and T2-weighted imaging and contrast-enhanced MR imaging was performed in 43 patients with cavernous haemangiomas and 16 patients with schwannomas confirmed by pathology. Location, configuration, margins, signal intensity, homogeneity and enhancement pattern of the tumour were retrospectively evaluated.

Results: There was a significant difference between cavernous haemangiomas and schwannomas regarding the location, configuration and margins of the mass, signal intensity and homogeneity on T1- and T2-weighted imaging, the spread pattern of contrast enhancement, the enhancement pattern and the type of time-intensity curve (P<0.05). Markedly homogeneous hyperintensity signal on T2-weighted imaging and the spread pattern of the contrast enhancement favoured cavernous haemangioma rather than schwannoma (P<0.01).

Conclusion: Cavernous haemangiomas and schwannomas have different MR imaging features that could be helpful in the differentiation between the tumours. The spread pattern of the contrast enhancement on dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging is the most reliable finding distinguishing cavernous haemangiomas from schwannomas.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus