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Marine biodiversity in Japanese waters.

Fujikura K, Lindsay D, Kitazato H, Nishida S, Shirayama Y - PLoS ONE (2010)

Bottom Line: We expect global change to have a tremendous impact on marine biodiversity and ecosystems.Japan is in a particularly suitable geographic situation and has a lot of facilities for conducting marine science research.Japan has an important responsibility to contribute to our understanding of life in the oceans.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Biogeosciences, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Yokosuka, Kanagawa, Japan. fujikura@jamstec.go.jp

ABSTRACT
To understand marine biodiversity in Japanese waters, we have compiled information on the marine biota in Japanese waters, including the number of described species (species richness), the history of marine biology research in Japan, the state of knowledge, the number of endemic species, the number of identified but undescribed species, the number of known introduced species, and the number of taxonomic experts and identification guides, with consideration of the general ocean environmental background, such as the physical and geological settings. A total of 33,629 species have been reported to occur in Japanese waters. The state of knowledge was extremely variable, with taxa containing many inconspicuous, smaller species tending to be less well known. The total number of identified but undescribed species was at least 121,913. The total number of described species combined with the number of identified but undescribed species reached 155,542. This is the best estimate of the total number of species in Japanese waters and indicates that more than 70% of Japan's marine biodiversity remains un-described. The number of species reported as introduced into Japanese waters was 39. This is the first attempt to estimate species richness for all marine species in Japanese waters. Although its marine biota can be considered relatively well known, at least within the Asian-Pacific region, considering the vast number of different marine environments such as coral reefs, ocean trenches, ice-bound waters, methane seeps, and hydrothermal vents, much work remains to be done. We expect global change to have a tremendous impact on marine biodiversity and ecosystems. Japan is in a particularly suitable geographic situation and has a lot of facilities for conducting marine science research. Japan has an important responsibility to contribute to our understanding of life in the oceans.

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Schematic diagram of surface currents and climate regimes around Japan.Red and yellow arrows indicate warm (Kuroshio and Tsushima) and cold (Oyashio) currents, respectively.
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pone-0011836-g003: Schematic diagram of surface currents and climate regimes around Japan.Red and yellow arrows indicate warm (Kuroshio and Tsushima) and cold (Oyashio) currents, respectively.

Mentions: The Kuroshio and Tsushima Currents are the major warm currents in Japanese waters, and the Oyashio Current is the major cold current (Figure 3). The Kuroshio is the largest current in the Pacific [5]. This current begins in the East China Sea and runs along the Pacific coast of Japan. The current is about 200 km wide and its influence can be recognized to as deep as 700 m. The speed in the center of the current axis is 150–250 cm sec−1. Transport volume is estimated at 5×107 ton sec−1. The Tsushima Current splits from the Kuroshio Current and flows from off Kyushu into the Sea of Japan. The Oyashio Current flows southward through Japanese waters from off Hokkaido along the Pacific coast. The speed of this current is 20 cm sec−1 and the transportation ability of the Oyashio Current is smaller than that of the Kuroshio Current.


Marine biodiversity in Japanese waters.

Fujikura K, Lindsay D, Kitazato H, Nishida S, Shirayama Y - PLoS ONE (2010)

Schematic diagram of surface currents and climate regimes around Japan.Red and yellow arrows indicate warm (Kuroshio and Tsushima) and cold (Oyashio) currents, respectively.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2914005&req=5

pone-0011836-g003: Schematic diagram of surface currents and climate regimes around Japan.Red and yellow arrows indicate warm (Kuroshio and Tsushima) and cold (Oyashio) currents, respectively.
Mentions: The Kuroshio and Tsushima Currents are the major warm currents in Japanese waters, and the Oyashio Current is the major cold current (Figure 3). The Kuroshio is the largest current in the Pacific [5]. This current begins in the East China Sea and runs along the Pacific coast of Japan. The current is about 200 km wide and its influence can be recognized to as deep as 700 m. The speed in the center of the current axis is 150–250 cm sec−1. Transport volume is estimated at 5×107 ton sec−1. The Tsushima Current splits from the Kuroshio Current and flows from off Kyushu into the Sea of Japan. The Oyashio Current flows southward through Japanese waters from off Hokkaido along the Pacific coast. The speed of this current is 20 cm sec−1 and the transportation ability of the Oyashio Current is smaller than that of the Kuroshio Current.

Bottom Line: We expect global change to have a tremendous impact on marine biodiversity and ecosystems.Japan is in a particularly suitable geographic situation and has a lot of facilities for conducting marine science research.Japan has an important responsibility to contribute to our understanding of life in the oceans.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Biogeosciences, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Yokosuka, Kanagawa, Japan. fujikura@jamstec.go.jp

ABSTRACT
To understand marine biodiversity in Japanese waters, we have compiled information on the marine biota in Japanese waters, including the number of described species (species richness), the history of marine biology research in Japan, the state of knowledge, the number of endemic species, the number of identified but undescribed species, the number of known introduced species, and the number of taxonomic experts and identification guides, with consideration of the general ocean environmental background, such as the physical and geological settings. A total of 33,629 species have been reported to occur in Japanese waters. The state of knowledge was extremely variable, with taxa containing many inconspicuous, smaller species tending to be less well known. The total number of identified but undescribed species was at least 121,913. The total number of described species combined with the number of identified but undescribed species reached 155,542. This is the best estimate of the total number of species in Japanese waters and indicates that more than 70% of Japan's marine biodiversity remains un-described. The number of species reported as introduced into Japanese waters was 39. This is the first attempt to estimate species richness for all marine species in Japanese waters. Although its marine biota can be considered relatively well known, at least within the Asian-Pacific region, considering the vast number of different marine environments such as coral reefs, ocean trenches, ice-bound waters, methane seeps, and hydrothermal vents, much work remains to be done. We expect global change to have a tremendous impact on marine biodiversity and ecosystems. Japan is in a particularly suitable geographic situation and has a lot of facilities for conducting marine science research. Japan has an important responsibility to contribute to our understanding of life in the oceans.

Show MeSH