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Skull base approaches in neurosurgery.

Scholz M, Parvin R, Thissen J, Löhnert C, Harders A, Blaeser K - Head Neck Oncol (2010)

Bottom Line: It is very important for the neurosurgeon to choose the right approach in order to reach the lesion without harming the other intact structures.In the following text these approaches will be described.These approaches are:1) pterional approach2) frontolateral approach3) transsphenoidal approach4) suboccipital lateral approachThese approaches can be extended and combined with each other.In the following we want to enhance this philosophy.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, Klinikum Duisburg, Academic Teaching Hospital of University Essen-Duisburg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
The skull base surgery is one of the most demanding surgeries. There are different structures that can be injured easily, by operating in the skull base. It is very important for the neurosurgeon to choose the right approach in order to reach the lesion without harming the other intact structures. Due to the pioneering work of Cushing, Hirsch, Yasargil, Krause, Dandy and other dedicated neurosurgeons, it is possible to address the tumor and other lesions in the anterior, the mid-line and the posterior cranial base. With the transsphenoidal, the frontolateral, the pterional and the lateral suboccipital approach nearly every region of the skull base is exposable.In the current state many different skull base approaches are described for various neurosurgical diseases during the last 20 years. The selection of an approach may differ from country to country, e.g., in the United States orbitozygomaticotomy for special lesions of the anterior skull base or petrosectomy for clivus meningiomas, are found more frequently than in Europe.The reason for writing the review was the question: Are there keyhole approaches with which someone can deal with a vast variety of lesions in the neurosurgical field?In my opinion the different surgical approaches mentioned above cover almost 95% of all skull base tumors and lesions. In the following text these approaches will be described.These approaches are:1) pterional approach2) frontolateral approach3) transsphenoidal approach4) suboccipital lateral approachThese approaches can be extended and combined with each other. In the following we want to enhance this philosophy.

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After tumor removal. The suction tip is located between internal carotid artery and oculomotor nerve.
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Figure 8: After tumor removal. The suction tip is located between internal carotid artery and oculomotor nerve.

Mentions: 64-year-old woman presented with unknown symptoms of vertigo and diplopia. Further there were no clinical deficits. The MRI showed a left space-consuming lesion latero para- and retrosellar of approximately 2 × 2,5 cm size (Figure 6). We suspected a dorsum sellae meningioma. The intraoperative view demonstrates the exact location of the tumor (Figure 7, Figure 8, Figure 9).


Skull base approaches in neurosurgery.

Scholz M, Parvin R, Thissen J, Löhnert C, Harders A, Blaeser K - Head Neck Oncol (2010)

After tumor removal. The suction tip is located between internal carotid artery and oculomotor nerve.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2913918&req=5

Figure 8: After tumor removal. The suction tip is located between internal carotid artery and oculomotor nerve.
Mentions: 64-year-old woman presented with unknown symptoms of vertigo and diplopia. Further there were no clinical deficits. The MRI showed a left space-consuming lesion latero para- and retrosellar of approximately 2 × 2,5 cm size (Figure 6). We suspected a dorsum sellae meningioma. The intraoperative view demonstrates the exact location of the tumor (Figure 7, Figure 8, Figure 9).

Bottom Line: It is very important for the neurosurgeon to choose the right approach in order to reach the lesion without harming the other intact structures.In the following text these approaches will be described.These approaches are:1) pterional approach2) frontolateral approach3) transsphenoidal approach4) suboccipital lateral approachThese approaches can be extended and combined with each other.In the following we want to enhance this philosophy.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, Klinikum Duisburg, Academic Teaching Hospital of University Essen-Duisburg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
The skull base surgery is one of the most demanding surgeries. There are different structures that can be injured easily, by operating in the skull base. It is very important for the neurosurgeon to choose the right approach in order to reach the lesion without harming the other intact structures. Due to the pioneering work of Cushing, Hirsch, Yasargil, Krause, Dandy and other dedicated neurosurgeons, it is possible to address the tumor and other lesions in the anterior, the mid-line and the posterior cranial base. With the transsphenoidal, the frontolateral, the pterional and the lateral suboccipital approach nearly every region of the skull base is exposable.In the current state many different skull base approaches are described for various neurosurgical diseases during the last 20 years. The selection of an approach may differ from country to country, e.g., in the United States orbitozygomaticotomy for special lesions of the anterior skull base or petrosectomy for clivus meningiomas, are found more frequently than in Europe.The reason for writing the review was the question: Are there keyhole approaches with which someone can deal with a vast variety of lesions in the neurosurgical field?In my opinion the different surgical approaches mentioned above cover almost 95% of all skull base tumors and lesions. In the following text these approaches will be described.These approaches are:1) pterional approach2) frontolateral approach3) transsphenoidal approach4) suboccipital lateral approachThese approaches can be extended and combined with each other. In the following we want to enhance this philosophy.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus