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Prevalence and risk factors of sexually transmitted infections and cervical neoplasia in women from a rural area of southern Mozambique.

Menéndez C, Castellsagué X, Renom M, Sacarlal J, Quintó L, Lloveras B, Klaustermeier J, Kornegay JR, Sigauque B, Bosch FX, Alonso PL - Infect Dis Obstet Gynecol (2010)

Bottom Line: The prevalence of Neisseria gonorrhea and Chlamydia trachomatis were 14% and 8%, respectively, and Syphilis was diagnosed in 12% of women.Risk factors associated with the presence of some of the STIs were being divorced or widowed, having more than one sexual partner and having the partner living in another area.A higher prevalence was observed in the reproductive age group and some of the STIs were more frequently diagnosed in pregnant women.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Manhiça Health Research Center, Manhiça, Maputo, Mozambique. menendez@clinic.ub.es

ABSTRACT
There is limited information on the prevalence of sexually transmitted infections and the prevalence of cervical neoplasia in rural sub-Saharan Africa. This study describes the prevalence and the etiology of STIs and the prevalence of cervical neoplasia among women in southern Mozambique. An age-stratified cross-sectional study was performed where 262 women aged 14 to 61 years were recruited at the antenatal clinic (59%), the family-planning clinic (7%), and from the community (34%). At least one active STI was diagnosed in 79% of women. Trichomonas vaginalis was present in 31% of all study participants. The prevalence of Neisseria gonorrhea and Chlamydia trachomatis were 14% and 8%, respectively, and Syphilis was diagnosed in 12% of women. HPV DNA was detected in 40% of women and cervical neoplasia was diagnosed in 12% of all women. Risk factors associated with the presence of some of the STIs were being divorced or widowed, having more than one sexual partner and having the partner living in another area. A higher prevalence was observed in the reproductive age group and some of the STIs were more frequently diagnosed in pregnant women. STI control programs are a priority to reduce the STIs burden, including HIV and cervical neoplasia.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Seroprevalence of syphilis, HIV and HSV-2 (a) and prevalence of gonococcal, HPV, trichomonal and chlamydia trachomatis (CT) infections (b).
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: Seroprevalence of syphilis, HIV and HSV-2 (a) and prevalence of gonococcal, HPV, trichomonal and chlamydia trachomatis (CT) infections (b).

Mentions: The overall prevalence of gonoccocal infection was 14% (34/250). It was 19% (27/145) in pregnant women and 33% (6/18) among women attending the FPC. Prevalence was associated with age (P < .001), being more prevalent in the younger age group. Antimicrobial sensitivity of the NG was 61% for erythromycin, 18% for penicillin and ampicillin, 15% for chloramphenicol, 9% for gentamicin and 3% for cotrimoxazol. Sensitivity to ceftriaxone, spectinomycin and azythromycin was not assessed. CT DNA was detected in 7.5% (19/253) of cervical samples. The prevalence was lower in the 41–61 age group, but there was no statistically significant association with age. Among pregnant women, the prevalence was 10% (15/151). Thirty-nine women had a RPR positive test (15%), of which 31 (75%) were confirmed by EIA, giving an overall syphilis prevalence of 12% (31/258). The prevalence increased with age, but this relationship was not statistically significant (P = .67). Among pregnant women, syphilis prevalence was 10% (15/149). Overall prevalence of IgG antibodies against T pallidum was 39% (100/257), increasing significantly with age (P < .001). Overall seroprevalence of HIV was 12% (30/256) and 21% (4/19) among women attending the FPC. The highest prevalence was found in the 31–50 age group (15%; 16/104), but there was no significant relationship with age. Anti-HSV-2 antibodies were found in 83% (213/257) of all participants. This frequency increased significantly with age (test for trend P < .001). The lowest prevalence (56%; 28/50) was in the youngest age group. HBsAg was detected in 8% (20/255) and anti-HBc in 62.5% (160/256) of women, respectively. The overall prevalence of HPV DNA was 40% (100/253), the highest was in the youngest age group (test for trend P < .001), and decreased with age (see Figure 1). HPV genotypes have been already published [23] Cervical neoplasia was detected in 30 women (12.2%): 5.3% (13/245) with LSIL (low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions that include CIN I), 6.5% (16/245) with HSIL (high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions that include CIN II and III), and one woman (0.4%) with carcinoma.


Prevalence and risk factors of sexually transmitted infections and cervical neoplasia in women from a rural area of southern Mozambique.

Menéndez C, Castellsagué X, Renom M, Sacarlal J, Quintó L, Lloveras B, Klaustermeier J, Kornegay JR, Sigauque B, Bosch FX, Alonso PL - Infect Dis Obstet Gynecol (2010)

Seroprevalence of syphilis, HIV and HSV-2 (a) and prevalence of gonococcal, HPV, trichomonal and chlamydia trachomatis (CT) infections (b).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2913799&req=5

fig1: Seroprevalence of syphilis, HIV and HSV-2 (a) and prevalence of gonococcal, HPV, trichomonal and chlamydia trachomatis (CT) infections (b).
Mentions: The overall prevalence of gonoccocal infection was 14% (34/250). It was 19% (27/145) in pregnant women and 33% (6/18) among women attending the FPC. Prevalence was associated with age (P < .001), being more prevalent in the younger age group. Antimicrobial sensitivity of the NG was 61% for erythromycin, 18% for penicillin and ampicillin, 15% for chloramphenicol, 9% for gentamicin and 3% for cotrimoxazol. Sensitivity to ceftriaxone, spectinomycin and azythromycin was not assessed. CT DNA was detected in 7.5% (19/253) of cervical samples. The prevalence was lower in the 41–61 age group, but there was no statistically significant association with age. Among pregnant women, the prevalence was 10% (15/151). Thirty-nine women had a RPR positive test (15%), of which 31 (75%) were confirmed by EIA, giving an overall syphilis prevalence of 12% (31/258). The prevalence increased with age, but this relationship was not statistically significant (P = .67). Among pregnant women, syphilis prevalence was 10% (15/149). Overall prevalence of IgG antibodies against T pallidum was 39% (100/257), increasing significantly with age (P < .001). Overall seroprevalence of HIV was 12% (30/256) and 21% (4/19) among women attending the FPC. The highest prevalence was found in the 31–50 age group (15%; 16/104), but there was no significant relationship with age. Anti-HSV-2 antibodies were found in 83% (213/257) of all participants. This frequency increased significantly with age (test for trend P < .001). The lowest prevalence (56%; 28/50) was in the youngest age group. HBsAg was detected in 8% (20/255) and anti-HBc in 62.5% (160/256) of women, respectively. The overall prevalence of HPV DNA was 40% (100/253), the highest was in the youngest age group (test for trend P < .001), and decreased with age (see Figure 1). HPV genotypes have been already published [23] Cervical neoplasia was detected in 30 women (12.2%): 5.3% (13/245) with LSIL (low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions that include CIN I), 6.5% (16/245) with HSIL (high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions that include CIN II and III), and one woman (0.4%) with carcinoma.

Bottom Line: The prevalence of Neisseria gonorrhea and Chlamydia trachomatis were 14% and 8%, respectively, and Syphilis was diagnosed in 12% of women.Risk factors associated with the presence of some of the STIs were being divorced or widowed, having more than one sexual partner and having the partner living in another area.A higher prevalence was observed in the reproductive age group and some of the STIs were more frequently diagnosed in pregnant women.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Manhiça Health Research Center, Manhiça, Maputo, Mozambique. menendez@clinic.ub.es

ABSTRACT
There is limited information on the prevalence of sexually transmitted infections and the prevalence of cervical neoplasia in rural sub-Saharan Africa. This study describes the prevalence and the etiology of STIs and the prevalence of cervical neoplasia among women in southern Mozambique. An age-stratified cross-sectional study was performed where 262 women aged 14 to 61 years were recruited at the antenatal clinic (59%), the family-planning clinic (7%), and from the community (34%). At least one active STI was diagnosed in 79% of women. Trichomonas vaginalis was present in 31% of all study participants. The prevalence of Neisseria gonorrhea and Chlamydia trachomatis were 14% and 8%, respectively, and Syphilis was diagnosed in 12% of women. HPV DNA was detected in 40% of women and cervical neoplasia was diagnosed in 12% of all women. Risk factors associated with the presence of some of the STIs were being divorced or widowed, having more than one sexual partner and having the partner living in another area. A higher prevalence was observed in the reproductive age group and some of the STIs were more frequently diagnosed in pregnant women. STI control programs are a priority to reduce the STIs burden, including HIV and cervical neoplasia.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus