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Vaccine effectiveness estimates, 2004-2005 mumps outbreak, England.

Cohen C, White JM, Savage EJ, Glynn JR, Choi Y, Andrews N, Brown D, Ramsay ME - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2007)

Bottom Line: Of these children, 52 (16.7%) had received 1 dose of MMR vaccine, and 97 (31.1%) had received 2 doses.Vaccine effectiveness was 88% (95% confidence interval [CI] 83%-91%) for 1 dose and 95% (95% CI 93%-96%) for 2 doses.The effectiveness of 1 dose declined from 96% (95% CI 81%-99%) in 2-year-olds to 66% (95% CI 30%-83%) in 11- to 12-year-olds, and the effectiveness of 2 doses declined from 99% (95% CI 97%-99.5%) in 5- to 6-year-olds to 86% (95% CI 74%-93%) in 11- to 12-year-olds (p<0.001 for 1 or 2 doses).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Institute for Communicable Diseases, Johannesburg, South Africa. cherylc@nicd.ac.za

ABSTRACT
The United Kingdom and United States have recently experienced large outbreaks of mumps, which raises concerns about vaccine effectiveness. The effectiveness of the mumps component of the measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine was estimated using the screening method. In England from January 2004 through March 2005, 312 cases of mumps were reported in children eligible to have received 2 doses of MMR vaccine. Of these children, 52 (16.7%) had received 1 dose of MMR vaccine, and 97 (31.1%) had received 2 doses. Vaccine effectiveness was 88% (95% confidence interval [CI] 83%-91%) for 1 dose and 95% (95% CI 93%-96%) for 2 doses. The effectiveness of 1 dose declined from 96% (95% CI 81%-99%) in 2-year-olds to 66% (95% CI 30%-83%) in 11- to 12-year-olds, and the effectiveness of 2 doses declined from 99% (95% CI 97%-99.5%) in 5- to 6-year-olds to 86% (95% CI 74%-93%) in 11- to 12-year-olds (p<0.001 for 1 or 2 doses). Waning immunity may contribute to mumps outbreaks in older vaccinated populations.

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Estimates of the proportion of the population susceptible to mumps by age in 2005, applying study estimates of vaccine effectiveness to population coverage data.
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Figure 1: Estimates of the proportion of the population susceptible to mumps by age in 2005, applying study estimates of vaccine effectiveness to population coverage data.

Mentions: Overall estimates of vaccine effectiveness were 87.8% (95% confidence interval [CI] 83.1%–91.1%) for 1 dose and 94.6% (95% CI 92.9%–95.9%) for 2 doses. There was no statistically significant variation in vaccine effectiveness for 1 or 2 doses by area of residence (p = 0.3 for 1 dose, p = 0.7 for 2 doses) or sex (p = 0.7 for 1 dose, p = 0.2 for 2 doses). Vaccine effectiveness decreased with increasing age for those who received either 1 or 2 doses (p<0.001) (Table 3). Vaccine effectiveness also varied with birth cohort (p = 0.02 for 1 dose, p = 0.003 for 2 doses). As birth cohort and age were correlated, it was not possible to separate the effects of age group and birth cohort for 1-dose effectiveness; the effect of birth cohort on 2-dose effectiveness was lost when adjusted for age. Application of our estimates of vaccine effectiveness to UK coverage data (Figure 1) predicts that >20% of children 11–12 years of age are not protected against mumps.


Vaccine effectiveness estimates, 2004-2005 mumps outbreak, England.

Cohen C, White JM, Savage EJ, Glynn JR, Choi Y, Andrews N, Brown D, Ramsay ME - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2007)

Estimates of the proportion of the population susceptible to mumps by age in 2005, applying study estimates of vaccine effectiveness to population coverage data.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2913658&req=5

Figure 1: Estimates of the proportion of the population susceptible to mumps by age in 2005, applying study estimates of vaccine effectiveness to population coverage data.
Mentions: Overall estimates of vaccine effectiveness were 87.8% (95% confidence interval [CI] 83.1%–91.1%) for 1 dose and 94.6% (95% CI 92.9%–95.9%) for 2 doses. There was no statistically significant variation in vaccine effectiveness for 1 or 2 doses by area of residence (p = 0.3 for 1 dose, p = 0.7 for 2 doses) or sex (p = 0.7 for 1 dose, p = 0.2 for 2 doses). Vaccine effectiveness decreased with increasing age for those who received either 1 or 2 doses (p<0.001) (Table 3). Vaccine effectiveness also varied with birth cohort (p = 0.02 for 1 dose, p = 0.003 for 2 doses). As birth cohort and age were correlated, it was not possible to separate the effects of age group and birth cohort for 1-dose effectiveness; the effect of birth cohort on 2-dose effectiveness was lost when adjusted for age. Application of our estimates of vaccine effectiveness to UK coverage data (Figure 1) predicts that >20% of children 11–12 years of age are not protected against mumps.

Bottom Line: Of these children, 52 (16.7%) had received 1 dose of MMR vaccine, and 97 (31.1%) had received 2 doses.Vaccine effectiveness was 88% (95% confidence interval [CI] 83%-91%) for 1 dose and 95% (95% CI 93%-96%) for 2 doses.The effectiveness of 1 dose declined from 96% (95% CI 81%-99%) in 2-year-olds to 66% (95% CI 30%-83%) in 11- to 12-year-olds, and the effectiveness of 2 doses declined from 99% (95% CI 97%-99.5%) in 5- to 6-year-olds to 86% (95% CI 74%-93%) in 11- to 12-year-olds (p<0.001 for 1 or 2 doses).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Institute for Communicable Diseases, Johannesburg, South Africa. cherylc@nicd.ac.za

ABSTRACT
The United Kingdom and United States have recently experienced large outbreaks of mumps, which raises concerns about vaccine effectiveness. The effectiveness of the mumps component of the measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine was estimated using the screening method. In England from January 2004 through March 2005, 312 cases of mumps were reported in children eligible to have received 2 doses of MMR vaccine. Of these children, 52 (16.7%) had received 1 dose of MMR vaccine, and 97 (31.1%) had received 2 doses. Vaccine effectiveness was 88% (95% confidence interval [CI] 83%-91%) for 1 dose and 95% (95% CI 93%-96%) for 2 doses. The effectiveness of 1 dose declined from 96% (95% CI 81%-99%) in 2-year-olds to 66% (95% CI 30%-83%) in 11- to 12-year-olds, and the effectiveness of 2 doses declined from 99% (95% CI 97%-99.5%) in 5- to 6-year-olds to 86% (95% CI 74%-93%) in 11- to 12-year-olds (p<0.001 for 1 or 2 doses). Waning immunity may contribute to mumps outbreaks in older vaccinated populations.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus