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Simple sari cloth filtration of water is sustainable and continues to protect villagers from cholera in Matlab, Bangladesh.

Huq A, Yunus M, Sohel SS, Bhuiya A, Emch M, Luby SP, Russek-Cohen E, Nair GB, Sack RB, Colwell RR - MBio (2010)

Bottom Line: A follow-up study was conducted 5 years later to determine whether the filtration method continued to be employed by villagers and its impact on the incidence of cholera.Analysis of the data showed that 31% of the women used a filter of which 60% used sari filters for household water.Results showed that sari filtration not only was accepted and sustained by the villagers and benefited them, including their neighbors not filtering water, in reducing the incidence of cholera, the latter being an unexpected benefit.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Maryland Pathogen Research Institute, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, USA.

ABSTRACT
A simple method for filtering water to reduce the incidence of cholera was tested in a field trial in Matlab, Bangladesh, and proved effective. A follow-up study was conducted 5 years later to determine whether the filtration method continued to be employed by villagers and its impact on the incidence of cholera. A total of 7,233 village women collecting water daily for their households in Bangladesh were selected from the same study population of the original field trial for interviewing. Analysis of the data showed that 31% of the women used a filter of which 60% used sari filters for household water. Results showed that sari filtration not only was accepted and sustained by the villagers and benefited them, including their neighbors not filtering water, in reducing the incidence of cholera, the latter being an unexpected benefit.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Incidence of cholera in non-water-filtering households by neighborhood use of water filtration. The number of cases of cholera per 1,000 individuals (Cases/1000) is shown in the key to the right of the graph.
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f1: Incidence of cholera in non-water-filtering households by neighborhood use of water filtration. The number of cases of cholera per 1,000 individuals (Cases/1000) is shown in the key to the right of the graph.

Mentions: Additional analysis that was not part of the original study plan, was employed to explore the potential for indirect protection from cholera of households using sari cloth filtration, was done based on an earlier report (19). The percentage of villagers using some kind of filtration (sari, nylon, or gamcha, the local name for a thin towel) and living in proximity to participants of the original study was also calculated. Table 2 presents the 7,470 neighborhood clusters as five levels of cholera incidence (range, 0 to 33.3 per 1,000) stratified by neighborhood filtration percentage (range, 0 to 54.3%). Categories of approximately equal size were used, with zero values restricted to those neighborhoods with no cases as a separate category. Households not filtering water and located in neighborhoods where water filtration was not practiced were more likely to be in the highest incidence category (11.5 to 33.3 per 1,000). Households not filtering their water and in neighborhoods where water filtration was practiced (30.0 to 54.3%) rarely fell into the highest cholera incidence category and more than 50% of the time had an incidence rate lower than 5.1/1,000. This inverse relationship between neighborhoods where filtration was practiced and the incidence of cholera in the unprotected group is shown in Fig. 1. Figure 1 is a graphic presentation of data taken from Table 2 to illustrate the incidence of cholera by neighborhood filtration rate. The distribution shown is unlikely to have occurred by chance (chi-square statistic of 1,591.94; P ≤ 0.0001). Moreover, it is important to note that filtration was carried out by many households employing two or three layers of sari cloth, not the recommended four layers. Thus, this effect, although significant, could be further improved by reinforcement of the recommended practice.


Simple sari cloth filtration of water is sustainable and continues to protect villagers from cholera in Matlab, Bangladesh.

Huq A, Yunus M, Sohel SS, Bhuiya A, Emch M, Luby SP, Russek-Cohen E, Nair GB, Sack RB, Colwell RR - MBio (2010)

Incidence of cholera in non-water-filtering households by neighborhood use of water filtration. The number of cases of cholera per 1,000 individuals (Cases/1000) is shown in the key to the right of the graph.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2912662&req=5

f1: Incidence of cholera in non-water-filtering households by neighborhood use of water filtration. The number of cases of cholera per 1,000 individuals (Cases/1000) is shown in the key to the right of the graph.
Mentions: Additional analysis that was not part of the original study plan, was employed to explore the potential for indirect protection from cholera of households using sari cloth filtration, was done based on an earlier report (19). The percentage of villagers using some kind of filtration (sari, nylon, or gamcha, the local name for a thin towel) and living in proximity to participants of the original study was also calculated. Table 2 presents the 7,470 neighborhood clusters as five levels of cholera incidence (range, 0 to 33.3 per 1,000) stratified by neighborhood filtration percentage (range, 0 to 54.3%). Categories of approximately equal size were used, with zero values restricted to those neighborhoods with no cases as a separate category. Households not filtering water and located in neighborhoods where water filtration was not practiced were more likely to be in the highest incidence category (11.5 to 33.3 per 1,000). Households not filtering their water and in neighborhoods where water filtration was practiced (30.0 to 54.3%) rarely fell into the highest cholera incidence category and more than 50% of the time had an incidence rate lower than 5.1/1,000. This inverse relationship between neighborhoods where filtration was practiced and the incidence of cholera in the unprotected group is shown in Fig. 1. Figure 1 is a graphic presentation of data taken from Table 2 to illustrate the incidence of cholera by neighborhood filtration rate. The distribution shown is unlikely to have occurred by chance (chi-square statistic of 1,591.94; P ≤ 0.0001). Moreover, it is important to note that filtration was carried out by many households employing two or three layers of sari cloth, not the recommended four layers. Thus, this effect, although significant, could be further improved by reinforcement of the recommended practice.

Bottom Line: A follow-up study was conducted 5 years later to determine whether the filtration method continued to be employed by villagers and its impact on the incidence of cholera.Analysis of the data showed that 31% of the women used a filter of which 60% used sari filters for household water.Results showed that sari filtration not only was accepted and sustained by the villagers and benefited them, including their neighbors not filtering water, in reducing the incidence of cholera, the latter being an unexpected benefit.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Maryland Pathogen Research Institute, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, USA.

ABSTRACT
A simple method for filtering water to reduce the incidence of cholera was tested in a field trial in Matlab, Bangladesh, and proved effective. A follow-up study was conducted 5 years later to determine whether the filtration method continued to be employed by villagers and its impact on the incidence of cholera. A total of 7,233 village women collecting water daily for their households in Bangladesh were selected from the same study population of the original field trial for interviewing. Analysis of the data showed that 31% of the women used a filter of which 60% used sari filters for household water. Results showed that sari filtration not only was accepted and sustained by the villagers and benefited them, including their neighbors not filtering water, in reducing the incidence of cholera, the latter being an unexpected benefit.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus