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The platelet count in cerebral malaria, is it useful to the clinician?

Chimalizeni Y, Kawaza K, Taylor T, Molyneux M - Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. (2010)

Bottom Line: We analyzed 1,811 children with cerebral malaria and compared them with 521 children with bacterial meningitis.Those with malarial retinopathy were more thrombocytopenic than those without.Our results suggest that the platelet count is not prognostic in Malawian children with cerebral malaria.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Paediatrics, College of Medicine, Private bag 360, Chichiri, Blantyre 3, Malawi. gaveta3@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT
We conducted this study to determine the prognostic significance of the platelet count in children with cerebral malaria. We studied children with cerebral malaria admitted to the pediatric research ward at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Malawi. We analyzed 1,811 children with cerebral malaria and compared them with 521 children with bacterial meningitis. There was a significant difference in platelet counts between children with cerebral malaria and those with meningitis. Among children with cerebral malaria, there was no relationship between the platelet count and either the admission coma score or the eventual outcome. Those with malarial retinopathy were more thrombocytopenic than those without. Our results suggest that the platelet count is not prognostic in Malawian children with cerebral malaria.

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Distribution of admission platelet counts in two patient groups: (0) clinical cerebral malaria (CM) without retinopathy (N = 294) and (1) CM with retinopathy (N = 324) (z = 7.277, P = 0.0000).
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Figure 2: Distribution of admission platelet counts in two patient groups: (0) clinical cerebral malaria (CM) without retinopathy (N = 294) and (1) CM with retinopathy (N = 324) (z = 7.277, P = 0.0000).

Mentions: There was a significant difference in the distribution of platelets between those children with clinical cerebral malaria who had retinopathy and those who did not (Figure 2). Children with cerebral malaria with retinopathy were twice as likely to be thrombocytopenic as were those without retinopathy.


The platelet count in cerebral malaria, is it useful to the clinician?

Chimalizeni Y, Kawaza K, Taylor T, Molyneux M - Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. (2010)

Distribution of admission platelet counts in two patient groups: (0) clinical cerebral malaria (CM) without retinopathy (N = 294) and (1) CM with retinopathy (N = 324) (z = 7.277, P = 0.0000).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2912574&req=5

Figure 2: Distribution of admission platelet counts in two patient groups: (0) clinical cerebral malaria (CM) without retinopathy (N = 294) and (1) CM with retinopathy (N = 324) (z = 7.277, P = 0.0000).
Mentions: There was a significant difference in the distribution of platelets between those children with clinical cerebral malaria who had retinopathy and those who did not (Figure 2). Children with cerebral malaria with retinopathy were twice as likely to be thrombocytopenic as were those without retinopathy.

Bottom Line: We analyzed 1,811 children with cerebral malaria and compared them with 521 children with bacterial meningitis.Those with malarial retinopathy were more thrombocytopenic than those without.Our results suggest that the platelet count is not prognostic in Malawian children with cerebral malaria.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Paediatrics, College of Medicine, Private bag 360, Chichiri, Blantyre 3, Malawi. gaveta3@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT
We conducted this study to determine the prognostic significance of the platelet count in children with cerebral malaria. We studied children with cerebral malaria admitted to the pediatric research ward at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Malawi. We analyzed 1,811 children with cerebral malaria and compared them with 521 children with bacterial meningitis. There was a significant difference in platelet counts between children with cerebral malaria and those with meningitis. Among children with cerebral malaria, there was no relationship between the platelet count and either the admission coma score or the eventual outcome. Those with malarial retinopathy were more thrombocytopenic than those without. Our results suggest that the platelet count is not prognostic in Malawian children with cerebral malaria.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus