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Roles of the metabolic syndrome, HDL cholesterol, and coronary atherosclerosis in subclinical inflammation.

Rein P, Saely CH, Beer S, Vonbank A, Drexel H - Diabetes Care (2010)

Bottom Line: Coronary stenoses >or=50% were considered significant.The MetS criteria low HDL cholesterol (P < 0.001), large waist (P < 0.001), high glucose (P < 0.001), and high blood pressure (P = 0.016), but not high triglycerides (P = 0.352), proved associated with CRP.CRP is strongly associated with the MetS but not with coronary atherosclerosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Vorarlberg Institute for Vascular Investigation and Treatment, Feldkirch, Austria.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The metabolic syndrome (MetS) and coronary artery disease (CAD) frequently coincide; their individual contribution to inflammation is unknown.

Research design and methods: We enrolled 1,010 patients undergoing coronary angiography. Coronary stenoses >or=50% were considered significant. The MetS was defined according to American Heart Association-revised National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria.

Results: C-reactive protein (CRP) did not differ between patients with significant CAD and subjects without significant CAD (P = 0.706) but was significantly higher in MetS patients than in those without MetS (P < 0.001). The MetS criteria low HDL cholesterol (P < 0.001), large waist (P < 0.001), high glucose (P < 0.001), and high blood pressure (P = 0.016), but not high triglycerides (P = 0.352), proved associated with CRP. When all MetS traits were considered simultaneously, only low HDL cholesterol proved independently associated with CRP (F = 44.19; P < 0.001).

Conclusions: CRP is strongly associated with the MetS but not with coronary atherosclerosis. The association of the MetS with subclinical inflammation is driven by the low HDL cholesterol feature.

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A: Relationship of the number of MetS components and CRP adjusted for age, sex, LDL cholesterol, smoking, and major cardiovascular medications. B: Further adjustment for the low HDL criterion. P value is given for the association of CRP with the number of MetS components.
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Figure 1: A: Relationship of the number of MetS components and CRP adjusted for age, sex, LDL cholesterol, smoking, and major cardiovascular medications. B: Further adjustment for the low HDL criterion. P value is given for the association of CRP with the number of MetS components.

Mentions: CRP increased significantly (Ptrend <0.001) with an increasing number of MetS traits (Fig. 1A) after adjustment for age, sex, smoking, LDL cholesterol, and major cardiovascular medications. Further adjustment for the high waist (F = 11.66; P = 0.001), the high glucose (F = 14.18; P < 0.001), the high blood pressure (F = 17.94; P < 0.001), and the high triglyceride (F = 32.81; P < 0.001) traits rendered this relationship virtually unchanged. In contrast, the positive association between the number of metabolic traits and CRP was no longer significant (Fig. 1B) after adjustment for the low HDL cholesterol criterion (F = 0.87; P = 0.352).


Roles of the metabolic syndrome, HDL cholesterol, and coronary atherosclerosis in subclinical inflammation.

Rein P, Saely CH, Beer S, Vonbank A, Drexel H - Diabetes Care (2010)

A: Relationship of the number of MetS components and CRP adjusted for age, sex, LDL cholesterol, smoking, and major cardiovascular medications. B: Further adjustment for the low HDL criterion. P value is given for the association of CRP with the number of MetS components.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2909077&req=5

Figure 1: A: Relationship of the number of MetS components and CRP adjusted for age, sex, LDL cholesterol, smoking, and major cardiovascular medications. B: Further adjustment for the low HDL criterion. P value is given for the association of CRP with the number of MetS components.
Mentions: CRP increased significantly (Ptrend <0.001) with an increasing number of MetS traits (Fig. 1A) after adjustment for age, sex, smoking, LDL cholesterol, and major cardiovascular medications. Further adjustment for the high waist (F = 11.66; P = 0.001), the high glucose (F = 14.18; P < 0.001), the high blood pressure (F = 17.94; P < 0.001), and the high triglyceride (F = 32.81; P < 0.001) traits rendered this relationship virtually unchanged. In contrast, the positive association between the number of metabolic traits and CRP was no longer significant (Fig. 1B) after adjustment for the low HDL cholesterol criterion (F = 0.87; P = 0.352).

Bottom Line: Coronary stenoses >or=50% were considered significant.The MetS criteria low HDL cholesterol (P < 0.001), large waist (P < 0.001), high glucose (P < 0.001), and high blood pressure (P = 0.016), but not high triglycerides (P = 0.352), proved associated with CRP.CRP is strongly associated with the MetS but not with coronary atherosclerosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Vorarlberg Institute for Vascular Investigation and Treatment, Feldkirch, Austria.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The metabolic syndrome (MetS) and coronary artery disease (CAD) frequently coincide; their individual contribution to inflammation is unknown.

Research design and methods: We enrolled 1,010 patients undergoing coronary angiography. Coronary stenoses >or=50% were considered significant. The MetS was defined according to American Heart Association-revised National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria.

Results: C-reactive protein (CRP) did not differ between patients with significant CAD and subjects without significant CAD (P = 0.706) but was significantly higher in MetS patients than in those without MetS (P < 0.001). The MetS criteria low HDL cholesterol (P < 0.001), large waist (P < 0.001), high glucose (P < 0.001), and high blood pressure (P = 0.016), but not high triglycerides (P = 0.352), proved associated with CRP. When all MetS traits were considered simultaneously, only low HDL cholesterol proved independently associated with CRP (F = 44.19; P < 0.001).

Conclusions: CRP is strongly associated with the MetS but not with coronary atherosclerosis. The association of the MetS with subclinical inflammation is driven by the low HDL cholesterol feature.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus