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A case of orbital abscess following porous orbital implant infection.

Hong SW, Paik JS, Kim SY, Yang SW - Korean J Ophthalmol (2006)

Bottom Line: The patient was unresponsive to implant removal and MRI confirmed the presence of an orbital pus pocket.Despite extirpation of the four rectus muscles, inflammatory granulation debridement and abscess drainage, another new pus pocket developed.A patient who has risk factors for delayed wound healing must be examined thoroughly and extreme care such as exenteration must be taken if there is persistent infection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Ophthalmology, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: We present a case of orbital abscess following porous orbital implant infection in a 73-year-old woman with rheumatoid arthritis.

Methods: Just one month after a seemingly uncomplicated enucleation and porous polyethylene (Medpor) orbital implant surgery, implant exposure developed with profuse pus discharge. The patient was unresponsive to implant removal and MRI confirmed the presence of an orbital pus pocket. Despite extirpation of the four rectus muscles, inflammatory granulation debridement and abscess drainage, another new pus pocket developed.

Results: After partial orbital exenteration, the wound finally healed well without any additional abscess formation.

Conclusions: A patient who has risk factors for delayed wound healing must be examined thoroughly and extreme care such as exenteration must be taken if there is persistent infection.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Profuse pus discharge one month after removal of dermofat graft.
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Figure 2: Profuse pus discharge one month after removal of dermofat graft.

Mentions: The wound recovered well, and a month after abscess excision, dermo-fat tissue harvested from the inguinal area was grafted to orbital defect site. The, graft failed to survive, and pus discharge from the wound developed once again. The graft was removed a month after implantation, but the discharge persisted (Fig. 2).


A case of orbital abscess following porous orbital implant infection.

Hong SW, Paik JS, Kim SY, Yang SW - Korean J Ophthalmol (2006)

Profuse pus discharge one month after removal of dermofat graft.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2908858&req=5

Figure 2: Profuse pus discharge one month after removal of dermofat graft.
Mentions: The wound recovered well, and a month after abscess excision, dermo-fat tissue harvested from the inguinal area was grafted to orbital defect site. The, graft failed to survive, and pus discharge from the wound developed once again. The graft was removed a month after implantation, but the discharge persisted (Fig. 2).

Bottom Line: The patient was unresponsive to implant removal and MRI confirmed the presence of an orbital pus pocket.Despite extirpation of the four rectus muscles, inflammatory granulation debridement and abscess drainage, another new pus pocket developed.A patient who has risk factors for delayed wound healing must be examined thoroughly and extreme care such as exenteration must be taken if there is persistent infection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Ophthalmology, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: We present a case of orbital abscess following porous orbital implant infection in a 73-year-old woman with rheumatoid arthritis.

Methods: Just one month after a seemingly uncomplicated enucleation and porous polyethylene (Medpor) orbital implant surgery, implant exposure developed with profuse pus discharge. The patient was unresponsive to implant removal and MRI confirmed the presence of an orbital pus pocket. Despite extirpation of the four rectus muscles, inflammatory granulation debridement and abscess drainage, another new pus pocket developed.

Results: After partial orbital exenteration, the wound finally healed well without any additional abscess formation.

Conclusions: A patient who has risk factors for delayed wound healing must be examined thoroughly and extreme care such as exenteration must be taken if there is persistent infection.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus