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Two cases of uveal effusion syndrome.

Lee JH, Choi JY, Kim SS - Korean J Ophthalmol (2006)

Bottom Line: The first case was a 25-year-old man who presented with decreased visual acuity in the left eye and hypotony.Fundus examination revealed choroidal effusion and retinal detachment with a thickened eyeball.The visual acuity of the nanophthalmic patient was well maintained during a 3-year follow-up period without treatment. appropriate treatment modalities should be considered depending on the ophthalmic condition of the individual patient.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Institute of Vision Research, Department of Ophthalmology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To report a case of uveal effusion syndrome associated with hypotony and a case of uveal effusion syndrome in nanophthalmos.

Methods: The first case was a 25-year-old man who presented with decreased visual acuity in the left eye and hypotony. Fundus examination revealed choroidal effusion and retinal detachment with a thickened eyeball. Partial thickness sclerotomy and sclerectomy were performed. The second case was a 13-year-old boy who had uveal effusion syndrome with a nanophthalmic eye.

Results: In the patient with hypotony, intraocular pressure was well maintained following partial thickness sclerotomy and sclerectomy, and choroidal effusion and retinal detachment were reduced. The visual acuity of the nanophthalmic patient was well maintained during a 3-year follow-up period without treatment.

Conclusions: appropriate treatment modalities should be considered depending on the ophthalmic condition of the individual patient.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Color photograph of case 1 at postoperative 2 months showing attached retina and near complete resolution of choroidal detachment.
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Figure 3: Color photograph of case 1 at postoperative 2 months showing attached retina and near complete resolution of choroidal detachment.

Mentions: Subscleral sclerectomy was performed at two sites in the temporoinferior and nasoinferior quadrants. A half thickness scleral flap measuring 4×4 mm was made 8 mm from the limbus. Under the scleral flap, the remaining thickness of the sclera was excised in pieces measuring 2×2 mm, thereby exposing the choroid. The scleral flap was loosely sutured and C3F8 gas was injected into the vitreous. At postoperative 1 week, IOP in the left eye was 46 mmHg, and Diamox®, Cosopt®, Alphagan® and Xalatan® were administered. One week later the IOP in the left eye was 17 mmHg. At postoperative 2 months, fundus examination (Fig. 3) revealed an attached retina and near complete resolution of the choroidal detachment. Five months after surgery, IOP was 11 mmHg and BCVA was 0.1 in the left eye. No surgery-related side effects were noted and cataract surgery was considered to improve visual acuity.


Two cases of uveal effusion syndrome.

Lee JH, Choi JY, Kim SS - Korean J Ophthalmol (2006)

Color photograph of case 1 at postoperative 2 months showing attached retina and near complete resolution of choroidal detachment.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2908827&req=5

Figure 3: Color photograph of case 1 at postoperative 2 months showing attached retina and near complete resolution of choroidal detachment.
Mentions: Subscleral sclerectomy was performed at two sites in the temporoinferior and nasoinferior quadrants. A half thickness scleral flap measuring 4×4 mm was made 8 mm from the limbus. Under the scleral flap, the remaining thickness of the sclera was excised in pieces measuring 2×2 mm, thereby exposing the choroid. The scleral flap was loosely sutured and C3F8 gas was injected into the vitreous. At postoperative 1 week, IOP in the left eye was 46 mmHg, and Diamox®, Cosopt®, Alphagan® and Xalatan® were administered. One week later the IOP in the left eye was 17 mmHg. At postoperative 2 months, fundus examination (Fig. 3) revealed an attached retina and near complete resolution of the choroidal detachment. Five months after surgery, IOP was 11 mmHg and BCVA was 0.1 in the left eye. No surgery-related side effects were noted and cataract surgery was considered to improve visual acuity.

Bottom Line: The first case was a 25-year-old man who presented with decreased visual acuity in the left eye and hypotony.Fundus examination revealed choroidal effusion and retinal detachment with a thickened eyeball.The visual acuity of the nanophthalmic patient was well maintained during a 3-year follow-up period without treatment. appropriate treatment modalities should be considered depending on the ophthalmic condition of the individual patient.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Institute of Vision Research, Department of Ophthalmology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To report a case of uveal effusion syndrome associated with hypotony and a case of uveal effusion syndrome in nanophthalmos.

Methods: The first case was a 25-year-old man who presented with decreased visual acuity in the left eye and hypotony. Fundus examination revealed choroidal effusion and retinal detachment with a thickened eyeball. Partial thickness sclerotomy and sclerectomy were performed. The second case was a 13-year-old boy who had uveal effusion syndrome with a nanophthalmic eye.

Results: In the patient with hypotony, intraocular pressure was well maintained following partial thickness sclerotomy and sclerectomy, and choroidal effusion and retinal detachment were reduced. The visual acuity of the nanophthalmic patient was well maintained during a 3-year follow-up period without treatment.

Conclusions: appropriate treatment modalities should be considered depending on the ophthalmic condition of the individual patient.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus